2010 Accountability Reporting for the Community Colleges (ARCC) (Year ending in 2008-2009)

June 10, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Business, Management
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2010 Accountability Reporting for the Community Colleges (ARCC) for the SBCCD Board of Trustees (Year ending in 2008-2009) Prepared and Presented by: Dr. James Smith, Director, Office of Research and Planning, SBVC Keith Wurtz, Director, Office of Research and Planning, CHC

Accountability Reporting for the Community Colleges (ARCC) 

Background • In 2005 Assembly Bill AB1417 required the California Community College System Office develop a framework for evaluating community college performance

• The goal of the framework was to provide information to help improve instruction and programs for student success • The framework needed to reflect the breadth of the mission of the California community colleges

ARCC Data and Methods 

Four areas of analysis

• Student Progress and Achievement Rate (SPAR) (Degrees/Certificates/Transfer) • Student Progress and Achievement (Vocational/Occupational/Workforce Development ) • Pre-collegiate Improvement (Basic Skills and ESL) • College profile (FTES, Age, Gender, Ethnicity)



Two methods of cohort comparison

• Self Comparison (trend analysis, change over time) • Peer Group Comparison (comparison with similar campuses in the California Community College System—determined through a cluster analysis procedure)

ARCC Cohorts 

Six Year Cohort – Percent of cohort of first-time students with minimum of 12 units earned who attempted a degree/certificate/transfer course within six years • •



Student Progress and Achievement Rate (SPAR) Percent of students who earned at least 30 units

One Year Cohort – Percent of cohort of first-time students with minimum of six units earned in their first Fall term who return and enroll in the subsequent Fall term • Persistence Rate



Three Year Cohort – Percent of students who successfully completed a course in the initial cohort year and within three years successfully completed a higher level course in the same subject • ESL Improvement Rate • Basic Skills Improvement Rate

Annual Rates 

Annual Rates – measure the progress of students enrolled in the specified courses in the following academic years (i.e. summer, fall, and spring): 2005-2006, 2006-2007, and 2008-2009. • Vocational course success rate • Basic skills course success rate

Crafton Hills College 2010 ARCC Report for the SBCCD Board of Trustees Keith Wurtz, M.A.

Targets for the following ARCC outcome measures presented here have been developed in Crafton’s Educational Master Plan and are available in the plan.

Student Progress & Achievement Rate (SPAR) (2010 cohorts Table 1.1) 60.0% 50.0%

52.3%

51.3%

53.5%

40.0% 30.0% 20.0%

10.0% 0.0%

01-02 to 06-07 02-03 to 07-08 03-04 to 08-09 The SPAR rate has had a slight increase in the last three cohorts. A strategy for increasing the SPAR rate involves focusing resources in basic skills improvement since most of Crafton’s incoming students place into basic skills English, math, and reading courses.

Percent of Students Who Earned at Least 30 Units (2010 cohorts Table 1.1a) 80.0% 70.0%

60.0%

70.6%

71.1%

66.0%

50.0%

40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 01-02 to 06-07

02-03 to 07-08

03-04 to 08-09

Research has indicated that earning 30 college units is related to a substantial increase in income. The CHC data indicates a sustained increase in the percent of first-time college students who earn at least 30 units.

Persistence Rate (2010 cohorts Table 1.2) 80.0% 70.0% 60.0%

67.30%

66.90%

65.70%

Fall 05-06

Fall 06-07

Fall 07-08

50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0%

10.0% 0.0%

Fall 2008 to Fall 2009 persistence is not shown here because the Fall 2009 data was not available when the 2010 ARCC report was published. The persistence rate at CHC has slightly declined over the last three cohort years.

Course Completion Rate for Vocational/Occupational and Workforce Development (2010 cohorts Table 1.3) 90% 80% 70%

79.2%

78.0%

78.9%

60%

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 06 to 07

07 to 08

08 to 09

In the last three academic years the vocational course success rate has essentially remained at the same level. At the same time, from 2007 – 2008 to 2008 – 2009 there has been an increase from 78% to 79%, which may indicate that the vocational course success rate has increased.

Completion Rates for Credit Basic Skills Courses (2010 cohorts Table 1.4) 70% 60%

59%

50%

55.40%

59.40%

40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 06 to 07

07 to 08

08 to 09

The basic skills success rate over the last three academic years may indicate a trend at CHC of there being an increase in success every other academic year.

Improvement Rates for Credit Basic Skills 70% 64.9%

60% 50%

59.5%

53.0%

40% 30%

20% 10% 0% 04-05 to 06-07

05-06 to 07-08

06-07 to 08-09

This is one of the most important ARCC outcome measures because most Crafton students place into a basic skills reading, math, or English course. Accordingly, in order to have an impact on measures like the SPAR rate Crafton needs to successfully move students through the basic skills sequences. The basic skills improvement data indicate a substantial upward trend from 53.0% to 64.9%.

Annual Unduplicated Headcount and FTES 10000 9000 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

8539

4359

8845

4281

9339

4586 Headcount FTES*

06-07

07-08

08-09

The data indicate that there is an upward trend in the annual number of unduplicated students and FTES at Crafton. *The FTES shown is taken from the Chancellor’s Office Data Mart and is the annual FTES that includes summer, fall, and spring of the academic year.

Age of Students at Enrollment 2008 – 2009 40.0% 35.0% 32.4%

30.0%

33.6%

29.4%

25.0% 20.0% 15.0%

10.0% 5.0% 4.6%

0.0% 19 or younger

20-24

25-49

Over 49

0.0%

Unknown

From 2006 – 2007 to 2008 – 2009 the age of students at Crafton has essentially stayed the same. However, there has been a slight increase in the percent of students 19 years old or younger and 24 years old or younger.

Gender of Students 60

Female

Male

Unknown

50 49

49.4

51.2

50.1 48.1

47.6

40 30

20 10

1.6

1.8

1.1

0

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

In the last three years the percent of female students at Crafton has increased while the percent of males has decreased.

Ethnicity of Students 2007-2008 60.0%

54.1%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

25.9% 20.0%

10.0%

7.6% 4.7%

1.1%

4.3%

1.8%

African American

Native American

Asian

Filipino

0.0%

0.6% Hispanic

Pacifica Islander

Unknown

White NonHispanic

From 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 there has been a slight decrease in the number of White Non-Hispanic students from 55.8% to 54.1%, and a slight increase in the number of Hispanic students from 25.4% to 25.9%.

Peer Group Comparisons 

Grouping procedure employed cluster analysis techniques that employ four steps: • Identify all indicators that are beyond the control of the college (campus and community demographic factors) • Identify those indicators that are correlated with specific outcomes • Use these factors to level the playing field • Create a cluster analysis model to identify appropriate peer group campuses.



Peer groups are different for each ARCC outcome measure and change every year

2008 – 2009 Academic Success Report Summary of Evidence (ARCC Outcomes)  Blue – Crafton has a higher rate than the peer group average and improved over the prior year’s cohort.  Yellow – Crafton has improved over the prior year’s cohort. Prior Year

Crafton’s Rate

Average

Low

High

1 SPAR

51.3

53.5

59.7

52.4

70.5

2 Percent 30 Units or more

70.6

71.1

69.6

53.9

78.2

3 Persistence

66.9

65.7

66.5

59.0

74.6

4 Vocational Course Success

78.0

78.9

74.7

64.5

81.9

5 Basic Skills Course Success

55.4

59.4

56.3

36.1

70.6

6 Basic Skills Improvement

59.5

64.9

54.2

34.9

69.5

#

Indicator

Crafton’s Peer Colleges

Addressing the Challenges 

 

Continue to develop and facilitate a culture of research and development that helps to inform decision making Integration of Instruction and Student Support Services Programs and Services     

 

Learning Communities Counseling Services Early Alert Faculty Mentorship Continue and enhance professional development Incorporate student mentors into the classroom Title V Transfer Prep Grant

Research Supporting Effectiveness of Learning Communities 

Students in Learning Community are more likely to successfully complete course with ―C‖ grade or better and persist from one term to the next than students in StandA-Lone Courses

90.0% 80.0%

Stand-A-Lone Learning Community

70.0% 60.0%

76.2%

73.8% 64.9%

67.1%

50.0% 40.0%

30.0% 20.0% 10.0%

0.0% Success

Term Persistence

Research Supporting Effectiveness of Counseling Services 

Students who see a counselor are more likely to successfully complete courses with a ―C‖ grade or better and persist from one term to the next than students who do not see a counselor

90.0% 80.0%

Did not see a Counselor Saw a Counselor

70.0% 60.0%

77.0%

75.0% 65.0% 56.0%

50.0% 40.0%

30.0% 20.0% 10.0%

0.0% Success

Persistence

Research Supporting Effectiveness of Health Services 

Students are more likely to finish class (retention) or successfully complete a course with a ―C‖ grade or better when they receive services from the Health and Wellness Center. Retention

Success

100% 90% 80%

86%

90%

87%

91%

87%

91%

69%

78%

78%

77%

70%

70%

69%

60% 50% 40% 30%

20% 10% 0% 2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010 No HWC Services

2007-2008 HWC Services

2008-2009

2009-2010

Research Supporting Effectiveness of Student Mentor Programs (Pilot Study) 

Introduction to Reading students were more likely to successfully complete their reading course with a ―C‖ grade or better if they had access to a mentor/tutor than students who did not have access to a mentor/tutor

100.0% 90.0% 80.0%

90.6% 84.5%

70.0%

No Mentors Mentors 74.1%

60.0%

61.3%

50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0%

0.0% Retention

Success

San Bernardino Valley College 2010 ARCC Report SBCCD Board of Trustees James E. Smith, Ph.D.

ARCC improvement target are integrated into the SBVC Strategic Plan and Strategic Initiatives with annual benchmarks and five year goals for each measure.

Student Progress & Achievement Rate (SPAR) (2010 Cohorts Table 1.1) 50.0% 40.0%

40.0%

41.4%

01-02 to 06-07

02-03 to 07-08

38.5%

30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

03-04 to 08-09

The SBVC SPAR rate has fluctuated between 38.5% and 40% over the last three cohort years with no defining trend.

Percent of Students Who Earned at Least 30 Units (2010 Cohorts Table 1.1a) 70.0% 60.0%

63.7%

65.1%

01-02 to 06-07

02-03 to 07-08

63.0%

50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0%

0.0% 03-04 to 08-09

The percentage of students who earn at least 30 units has remained stable between 63.7 and 65.1.

Persistence Rate (2010 Cohorts Table 1.2) 70% 60%

50%

61.8% 56.7%

61.0%

40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Fall 05-06

Fall 06-07

Fall 07-08

Persistence measures have remained stable in the high 50% to low 60% range. Persistence lags two years behind the reporting year because of data availability.

Course Completion Rate Vocational/Occupational & Workforce Development (2010 Cohorts Table 1.3) 80% 70%

71.9%

74.8%

74.6%

07 to 08

08 to 09

60% 50%

40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 06 to 07

Course completion in vocational/occupational courses has been on an upward trend over the period shown. This is the area of the highest pass-rate for SBVC .

Completion Rates for Credit Basic Skills Courses (2010 Cohorts Table 1.4) 60% 50%

50.3%

51.9%

06 to 07

07 to 08

53.5%

40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 08 to 09

Basic skills completion rates have shown a steady increase over the period of the ARCC reporting. The graph above shows a steady improvement trend.

Improvement Rates Credit Basic Skills 60% 50% 49.7%

50.5%

04-05 to 06-07

05-06 to 07-08

53.3%

40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 06-07 to 08-09

Basic skills improvement at SBVC has shown an upward trend over the entire period that ARCC data has been reported. This upward trend is due, in large part, to the institution’s commitment to the basic skills initiative.

Improvement Rates ESL Courses 70% 60% 50%

58.6%

44.9%

40%

41.9%

30% 20% 10% 0% 04-05 to 06-07

05-06 to 07-08

06-07 to 08-09

The ESL improvement rate at SBVC has shown dramatic fluctuations from the high 50% to the low 40% range. This is primarily due to a restructuring of the ESL curriculum. Non-credit courses are being planned for students with very weak skills; this is combined with ongoing efforts to build a stronger partnership with local adult schools.

Annual Unduplicated Headcount & FTES 25000 20000 19420

20802

22494

15000 10000 9415

9857

5000

10728 Headcount FTES

0 06-07

07-08

08-09

SBVC experienced an enrollment increase between 06-07 and 07-08 that was larger than changes in previous years. We can expect this trend to increase. The increase in FTES is not as dramatic because the ratio of part-time to full-time students.

Age of Students at Enrollment 2008–2009 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

44.9%

27.8% 20.9%

6.3%

19 or younger

20-24

25-49

Over 49

Ages of SBVC students have been stable from 2006 – 2007 to the present. There was a very slight increase in the percentage of students in the two lowest age groups. The average age of all SBVC students is approximately 29 years.

Student Gender 60.0% 56.3%

55.5%

55.6%

50.0% 40.0%

42.6%

43.7%

43.9%

Female

30.0%

Male Unknown

20.0% 10.0% 1.0%

0.7%

0.7%

0.0% 2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

The gap between male and female students has decreased over the last decade. The percentage of male students has increased in recent years.

Student Ethnicity 2007–2008 43.9%

45.0%

40.0%

35.0%

30.0%

25.0%

20.0%

23.0% 19.4%

15.0%

10.0%

5.7%

4.5%

5.0%

2.0%

0.9%

0.7%

0.0% African American

Native American

Asian

Filipino

Hispanic

Pacific Islander

Unknown

White NonHispanic

Students who identify themselves as Hispanic now represent over 44% of the SBVC population. Hispanic students gradually increased over the last decade as a percentage of SBVC population. This increase has been matched by a decline of White students as a percentage. Other groups have remained stable. This trend matches the ethnic composition of the surrounding community.

Academic Success Report 2007– 2008 Summary of Evidence (ARCC Outcomes)  Purple: Valley has a higher rate than the peer group average  Yellow: Valley has improved over the prior year’s cohort. Prior Year

Valley’s Rate

Average

Low

High

1 SPAR

41.6

38.5

47.9

37.5

62.4

2 Percent 30 Units or more

65.1

63.0

72.1

63.0

81.7

3 Persistence

61.7

61.0

59.9

39.8

74.9

4 Vocational Course Success

74.8

74.6

75.8

62.2

88.8

5 Basic Skills Course Success

51.9

53.5

56.3

39.1

70.6

6 Basic Skills Improvement

52.0

53.3

54.2

34.9

69.5

7 ESL Improvement

44.9

41.9

41.5

0.0

100.0

#

Indicator

Valley’s Peer Colleges

Last Years’ Recommendations for SBVC 

Strategies for increasing ARCC outcomes by improving data systems for student tracking and by implementing systems that encourage students to:     

See counselors on a regular basis; Following placement recommendations; Successfully complete prerequisite courses; Access tutorial resources; Participate in alternative learning groups (e.g., learning communities, Middle College High School, Valley-Bound Commitment, CalWorks, etc.).

Effects of MSSSC Counseling & Tutoring 

Biology Awards increased by over 400% (9 to 39): • Counselors make students aware of AA/AS Degree options.



Significantly higher success rates for program participants.

90% 81%

78%

80%

76% 71%

70% 60%

58%

62%

61%

60%

53%

49%

50%

All-success

40%

MSSSC-success

30% 20% 10% 0%

Geography

Chemistry

Math

Physics

Biology

Learning Communities 



 

Follow placement recommendations in a timely manner. Enroll before the beginning of the semester. Enroll in orientation courses. Visit a counselor on a regular basis: • • • • •

Tumaini; Valley-Bound; MCHS; CalWorks. Puente

Valley-Bound Program 

The Valley-Bound Commitment was named the sole recipient of the Chancellor’s Office Student Success Award 2010 for a commitment to diversity and higher levels of: • Retention; • Student success; • Persistence; • Full-time status.

Success Rate Comparison 80% 70% 60%

70%

69%

61%

64% 56%

50%

52%

40%

Valley Bound

30%

All students

20% 10% 0% All courses

Math

English

Assessment Testing 

SBVC implemented a single procedure for assessment using Accuplacer: • More flexibility; • Moving toward greater accuracy by refining cut scores.

Accommodate Non-Traditional Schedules  



Expansion of online offerings. Maintenance of weekend offerings. Introduction of open entry/open exit courses: • Basic skills math (Math 942 and 952).

Recommendations for Continued Improvement 







Maintain a data driven approach to all areas of student performance and success (upgrade the EIS data retrieval system). Expand partnerships with local educational and business institutions (business and community surveys are scheduled in conjunction with our strategic initiates). Maintain or expand access to programs with proven success : • Tutorial services for all students (MSSSC, Writing Center, LRC, Math Tutoring); • Learning communities (Valley-Bound, Tumaini, MCHS, Puente); • Greater access to basic skills courses (both credit and non-credit). Continue to foster a campus culture that provides broad based input for problem solving that is integrated with the: • The SBVC Strategic Initiatives; • The SBVC Educational Master Plan; • Accreditation Standards.

Summary 





Both colleges continue to place an emphasis on basic skills improvements and both had increases in the basic skills improvement rates for the second year in a row Both colleges have higher rates than two or more of their peer group averages Both colleges continue to identify strategies related to increasing the chance of achieving ARCC outcomes

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