Chapter 8: Room Planning

January 13, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Arts & Humanities, Architecture
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The Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Tinley Park, Illinois © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Chapter 8 Room Planning— Living Area 2 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Chapter 8 Overview • • • • • • • •

Introduction Designing with CADD Living Rooms Dining Rooms Entryway and Foyer Family Recreation Room Special-Purpose Rooms Patios, Porches, Courts, and Gazebos 3

© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Learning Objectives • Identify the rooms and areas that comprise the living area. • Apply design principles to planning a living room. • Integrate the furniture in a living room plan. • Analyze a dining room using good design principles. (continued) 4 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Learning Objectives • Design a functional entry and foyer. • Communicate the primary design considerations for a recreation room. • Integrate patios, porches, and courts into the total floor plan of a dwelling.

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Living Areas • The living area is the most visible part of the house. – Comprises about 1/3 of the house. – The location of family gatherings. – For recreation, entertaining, and relaxing. – Not restricted to interior space.

• Includes: – Living, dining, special-purpose, family recreation, and foyer. 6 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Living Areas

(The Oshkosh, WI private residence of Chancellor Richard 7 H. Wells and family—formerly the Alberta Kimball Home) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Designing with CADD

• CADD-generated rendering of a living area. (Helmuth A. Geiser, member AIBD) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Designing with CADD

• CADD-generated rendering of an exterior living area. (Helmuth A. Geiser, member AIBD) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Living Rooms • Often the center of activity. • Lifestyle will determine the size and arrangement. • Illustration shows a conversation area. 10 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Formal Living Room

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Living Room Size • Small Living Room – 150 square feet or less.

• Average Size Living Room – Around 250 square feet.

• Large Living Room – About 400 square feet.

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Beauty and Charm

(Manufactured Housing Institute) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Average Size Living Room

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Large Living Room

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Size and Design Questions • • • • •

What furniture is planned? How often will the room be used? How many people are expected? Is it a multipurpose room? Is the size in proportion to the rest of the house? 16

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Furniture Sizes

17 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Selecting Furniture

• Specific furniture should reflect room use. 18 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Location of the Living Room • Do not use as a traffic corridor. • Raising or lowering the floor level discourages through traffic. • Set the living room off to the side. • Position room at grade level to connect with outside. • Take advantage of outside views. • Entrance should not be into the living room. 19 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Poorly Located Living Room

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Minimized Through Traffic

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Living/Dining Relationship • Dining and entertaining are closely related. • Locate living room and dining room close together. • May be combined. • Use an informal divider in place of a wall. • An open plan appears larger than a closed plan. 22 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Living Room Orientation • Consider maximum comfort and energy conservation. – In warm climates, use northern orientation.

• Large windows and glass sliding door add spaciousness. • Walls should not be broken with too many small windows or doors. • The living room should be used. 23 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Living and Dining Combination

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Spaciousness Through Glass

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Living Room Decor • • • • •

Should be exciting. Use color. Use texture. Hide weak points. Coordinate the interior and exterior decor.

(Manufactured Housing Institute) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Living Room Decor

(Manufactured Housing Institute) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Warm and Cool Colors

(Manufactured Housing Institute) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Average Size Living Room

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• Designed for conversation. 29 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Open Style Living Room

30 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Dining Rooms • Popularity of dining rooms changes from time to time. • Lifestyle determines the need for a dining room. • May be formal or informal. • Special place for eating and family gatherings. 31 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Formal Dining Room

(NMC/Focal Point) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Open Versus Closed Plan • Decide early whether the dining room will be open or closed. • A closed plan places the dining room in a cubicle. – Reduces overflow to other rooms. – House appears smaller and less dramatic.

• An open plan enhances function and efficiency of the dining room. – Should be separated from the kitchen. 33 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Closed Dining Room Plan

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Open Dining Room Plan

(Armstrong World Industries, Inc.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Open Dining Room Plan

(Manufactured Housing Institute) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Dining Room Size • Small-Size Room – About 120 square feet. – Seating for 4 to 6 people.

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Dining Room Size • Medium-Size Room – About 12' x 15'. – 180 square feet. – Seating for 6 to 8 people.

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Dining Room Size • Large-Size Room – 14' x 18' and larger. – 252 square feet. – Seating for 8 or more people.

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Typical Dining Room Furniture • • • • •

Table Chairs Buffet China Cabinet Server or Cart

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Typical Dining Room Furniture

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Dining Room Arrangement • The dining room furniture arrangement depends on the room layout. • An outdoor vantage point should be considered when arranging furniture. • Orientation to other rooms should be considered. • Sufficient space should be provided between furniture. 42 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Dining Room Arrangement

(The Oshkosh, WI private residence of Chancellor Richard 43 H. Wells and family—formerly the Alberta Kimball Home) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Furniture Spacing • The centerline of chairs around a table should be at least 2'-3" apart. • Provide ample space for serving. • Usually 2'-0" is sufficient space behind chairs. • Consider space for wheelchairs. • A minimum of 32" is needed to pass between obstacles. 44 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Location of Dining Room • The dining room should be adjacent to the kitchen. • It should also be adjacent to the living room. • Might be near the family room. • It should provide for the natural movement of guests. 45 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Location of Dining Room

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Location of Dining Room

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Dining Room Decor • The dining room decor should encourage a happy conversation time. • Controlled lighting is desirable. • The color scheme is usually the same as the living room. • Flooring should be durable.

48 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Lighting Focus

(Focal Point, Inc.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Bright and Cheery Atmosphere

(Armstrong World Industries, Inc.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Good Traffic Circulation

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Ideal Location

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Entryway and Foyer • Every house has at least one entryway. • Not all houses have a foyer. • There are three basic types of entryways: – Main entry. – Service entry. – Special-purpose entry. 53 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Variety of Entryways

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Main Entry • The main entry should be centrally located. • It should open into a foyer. • You should be able to view callers without opening the door. • Glass side panels provide visibility, natural light, and design feature. 55 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Main Entry

(Photo Courtesy of James Hardie® Siding Products) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Entryway Design Features • The entryway should provide protection from the weather using: – Wide overhangs. – Recessed entry.

• It should be compatible with the overall house design. • It should provide enough space for several people. • Consider handicapped accessibility. 57 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Entry Protection

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Functional Entry

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Entry Doors • Good styling is important for main entry doors. • Should conform to the overall design. • Normally 3'-0" wide and 1-3/4" thick. • 34" minimum for a wheelchair. • Standard heights are 6'-8" and 8'-0". • Two doors add emphasis and function. 60 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Entry Doors

61 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Service Entrance • The service entrance is usually connected to the kitchen or utility room.

(Therma-Tru, Division of LST Corporation) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Special-Purpose Entries • Special-purpose entries provide access to patios, decks, and terraces.

(Thermal Industries, Inc.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Foyer • A foyer functions as a place to greet guests and remove coats and overshoes. • Needs soil-resistant flooring materials. – Slate, terrazzo, ceramic or asphalt tile, or linoleum. – Needs a coat closet at least 2' x 3' inside dimensions. 64 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Foyer Materials

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Foyer Design • Should capitalize on the design aspects of the entryway. • Consider unity between the inside and outside. • Use planters or potted plants as informal dividers. • An open plan is more desirable. • Use mirrors to create an open feeling. • Consider lighting for effect and safety. 66 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Foyer Design

67 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Foyer Design

68 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Size of Foyer • The size of the foyer will depend on several factors: – Size of the house. – Cost of the house. – Location of the foyer. – Personal preference. – Minimum size is 6' x 6'. – Average size is 8' x 10'. – Large size is larger than 8' x 10'. 69 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Small Foyer Design

70 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Entry and Foyer Design

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Split-Entry Design

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Family Recreation Room • Purpose: To provide a place where the family can play or pursue hobbies. • Design for function. • Design for easy maintenance. • Can serve as an overflow space. • Locations: Near dining or living rooms, between kitchen and garage, adjacent to patios, or in the basement. 73 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Family Recreation Room

• A recreation room such as this appears warm and inviting for relaxing family activities. (Photo Courtesy of Four Seasons Sunrooms) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Family Recreation Room

• The activities in this simple recreation room are focused around the entertainment center. 75 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Family Recreation Room

• This family recreation room is located between the kitchen and garage. (The Garlinghouse Company) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design • Consider the number of people to use the room. • Consider the type of activity. • Size is related to furniture selection. • Common size is 12' x 20'. • Choose functional materials that are easy to maintain. • Choose bright colors. 77 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Basement Recreation Room

(Formica Corporation) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

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• For relaxing, reading, and writing. 79 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

• For hobbies, work, and music. 80 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

• For board games, singing, or conversation. 81 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

• Functional furniture emphasizes the theme. (Wilsonart International) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

• Storage in the recreation room. 83 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

• Creative decorating gives the recreation room life and excitement. (Formica Corporation) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

• Designed for conversation and reading. 85 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Recreation Room Design

• Action room for young people. 86 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Special-Purpose Rooms • Home office, sunroom, music room, sunroom, computer room, etc. • May be part of another room. • May be located to the side or rear of the house. • Special-purpose rooms frequently have unique requirements: – Storage, lighting, ventilation, plumbing, and electrical. 87 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Special-Purpose Rooms

• Home office space. (Sauder Woodworking Co.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Special-Purpose Rooms

• Music room. (NMC/Focal Point) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Special-Purpose Rooms

• Sunroom. (Four Seasons Sunrooms) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Special-Purpose Rooms • Storage space is a primary consideration.

(Summitville Tile) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Patios, Porches, and Courts • Patios, porches, and courts enlarge the area and function of a home. • For maximum effectiveness, they should be planned in the overall design. • Many people enjoy outdoor living.

92 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Outdoor Living Space

• Deck. (Trex Co.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Outdoor Living Space

• Patio. (Thermal Industries, Inc.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Patios • Patios are near the house, but not structurally connected to it. • They are located at grade level. • Commonly used materials: – Concrete, brick, stone, rot-resistant wood.

• Patios are used for relaxing, playing, entertaining, and living. • Give consideration to the patio location. • Privacy: Screens, walls, and plants. 95 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Types of Patios

• This patio is an extension of the living space. 96 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Types of Patios

97 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Types of Patios • Quiet, secluded patio.

98 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Types of Patios

• Patio with a swimming pool. 99 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Porches and Decks • Porches and decks are different from patios in two ways: – Generally structurally connected. – Raised above the grade.

• • • •

Porches are covered . Decks are not covered. May function as outdoor eating areas. Balconies and verandas are types of porches that are higher. 100

© Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Porches and Decks • This enclosed porch is an excellent place to relax and enjoy a beautiful view.

(Marvin Windows) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Porches and Decks • This multilevel deck enhances the architectural design of the home.

(Trex Co.) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Porches and Patios

• Covered dining patio-porch. 103 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Porches and Patios

• This front entry porch is an integral part of the house. (Photo Courtesy of James Hardie® Siding Products) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

104

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Courts • Courts are similar to porches and patios. – Totally or partially enclosed by walls or roof. – May be used for dining, relaxing, talking, or entertaining. – May serve as interior gardens. – May be used to break up the floor plan or provide interior light.

105 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Courts

106 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Gazebos

• A gazebo is similar to a porch, but it is not attached to the house. It typically has open sides. 107 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Porch Application

108 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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Patio Application

109 © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.

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