CP Methods SW

January 6, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Social Science, Law, Criminal Justice
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Capital Punishment Methods (pp116-117)

Capital Punishment- today 

Knowledge and Understanding — historic and contemporary use of Capital Punishment in UK and world-wide (including overview of historic and current case studies), methods of execution, UN declarations. pp110-119



Analysis — Religious and secular viewpoints on the issues. pp 120-126



Evaluation —Comment on the strengths and weaknesses of viewpoints on capital punishment; religious and moral implications for the individual and society. pp 120-126

Discussion Point  Do

you think Capital Punishment is an acceptable sentence for crime?

 Are

there any situations where CP is more acceptable than others?

Issues we will return to 

How traumatic should CP be? What is the aim of CP (to kill/humiliate/degrade)?



Should CP be public or private (a dignified death)?



Should CP kill humanely and quickly?

7 seconds 

Take seven seconds and look around you.



What do you smell?



What do you taste?



What do you feel?

7 seconds 

Our brains stores enough oxygen for seven seconds of consciousness.



After beheading you would still have this amount of blood to keep you conscious.



Some people say the shock would cause you to black out. But what if you didn’t…

Methods Used Worldwide There are 7 main methods of execution in current use worldwide: • Hanging: if properly conducted, this is a humane method. The neck is broken and death comes quickly. •However, if the free-fall distance is inadequate, the prisoner ends up slowly being strangled to death. If it is too great, the rope will tear his/her head off.

• Electric chair: Nobody knows for sure how quickly a person dies from the electric shock, or what pain they experience. The internal organs are burned. It can often take a few charges of electricity before the person is killed. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNB7N OEU3IM

•Firing squad: The prisoner is bound and shot through the heart by multiple marksmen. Death appears to be quick, assuming the killers don't miss. In the U.S., only Utah used this method. It was abandoned in favour of lethal injection on 2004MAR-15, except for four convicted killers on death row who had previously chosen death by firing squad.

•Poison gas: Cyanide is dropped into acid producing Hydrogen Cyanide, a deadly gas. This takes many minutes of agony before a person dies.



Lethal injection: Lethal drugs are injected into the

prisoner while he lays strapped down to a table. If properly conducted, the prisoner fades quickly into unconsciousness. If the dosage of drugs is too low, the person may linger for many minutes, experiencing paralysis. Executions in the U.S. are gradually shifting to this method. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfiaDkK _sY8

Guillotine + Be-heading: A famous French invention. It severs the neck. Death comes very quickly (but very messy). (Be-heading in many Muslim countries). •

• Stoning: The prisoner is often buried up to her or

his neck and pelted with rocks until they eventually die. The rocks are chosen so that they are large enough to cause significant injury to the victim, but are not so large that a single rock will kill the prisoner. Used in some Muslim/ African countries as a penalty for murder, adultery and other crimes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MIaORknS1Dk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPqNCr8KKdU

From Times Gone by • Burning at the stake in public was used in Britain to punish heresy and in some cases witchcraft, committed by either sex, but latterly for women convicted of High Treason or Petty Treason.

The garrotte (or garotte) was the standard civilian method of execution in Spain. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pov2Ztg O_r4

•Hung, Drawn and Quartered - This was the ultimate punishment available in English law for men who had been convicted of High Treason. Women were burned at the stake instead, apparently for the sake of decency. The full sentence passed upon those convicted of High Treason up to 1870 was as follows : “That you be drawn on a hurdle to the place of execution where you shall be hanged by the neck and being alive cut down, your privy members shall be cut off and your bowels taken out and burned before you, your head severed from your body and your body divided into four quarters to be disposed of at the King’s pleasure.” So not for the faint-hearted then!!

Capital Punishment- today 

Knowledge and Understanding — historic and contemporary use of Capital Punishment in UK and world-wide (including overview of historic and current case studies), methods of execution, UN declarations. pp110-119



Analysis — Religious and secular viewpoints on the issues. pp 120-126



Evaluation —Comment on the strengths and weaknesses of viewpoints on capital punishment; religious and moral implications for the individual and society. pp 120-126

Your

senses are lying to you.

The State of Play 

Capital punishment has been used in almost every part of the globe, but in the last few decades many countries have abolished it. Abolitionist groups including Amnesty International classifies countries into four categories:    

58 countries maintain the death penalty in both law and practice. 94 have abolished it. 10 retain it for crimes committed in exceptional circumstances (such as in time of war). 35 permit its use for ordinary crimes, but have not used it for at least 10 years and are believed to have a policy or established practice of not carrying out executions or is under a moratorium.

Status of the death penalty worldwide as of 2005-NOV:

Status of the death penalty worldwide as of 2005-NOV:

Blue: Abolished for all crimes Green: Abolished for crimes not committed in exceptional circumstances (such as crimes committed in time of war) Orange: Abolished in practice Red: Legal form of punishment for heinous offences.

Since 2005 

Death Penalty Outlawed    

  



Argentina (2008) Chile (2008) Cook Islands (2007) Mexico (2005) Liberia (2005) Rwanda (2007) Uzbekistan (2008)

Death Penalty Outlawed for ‘normal crimes’  

Kazakhstan (2007) Kyrgyzstan (2007

The Death Penalty Worldwide 

According to Amnesty International, 137 countries have abolished the death penalty.



Argentina, Chile, and Uzbekistan outlawed the death penalty in 2008.



During 2007, 24 countries, 88% in China, Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and the United States alone, executed 1,252 people compared to 1,591 in 2006.



Nearly 3,350 people were sentenced to death in 51 countries.



More than 20,000 prisoners are on death row across the world.

The Death Penalty is Permitted in: 

Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, China (People's Republic), Comoros Congo (Democratic Republic), Cuba, Dominica, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Korea North, Korea South, Kuwait, Laos, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, Qatar, St. Kitts and Nevis St., Lucia St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United States, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

It is important to realise that the definition of heinous offences varies greatly around the world. In some states of the U.S. the death penalty is restricted to multiple murderers. Engaging in Pre-marital sex or changing one's religion can be a capital offence in other countries.

The

year is 3577.

Issues we can return to 

How traumatic should CP be? What is the aim of CP (to kill/humiliate/degrade)?



Should CP be public or private (a dignified death)?



Should CP kill humanely and quickly?

Purpose and Capital Punishment  To

what extent does Capital Punishment? Gain retribution Reform Deter Protect

Capital Punishment- Thursday 

Knowledge and Understanding — historic and contemporary use of Capital Punishment in UK and world-wide (including overview of historic and current case studies), methods of execution, UN declarations. pp 110-115



Analysis — Religious and secular viewpoints on the issues.



Evaluation —Comment on the strengths and weaknesses of viewpoints on capital punishment; religious and moral implications for the individual and society.

Specifically 

Timothy Evans



Ruth Ellis

For Thursday 27th Aug



“Capital punishment is still legal in the United States of America” Describe in detail two methods of execution in the USA. 4KU

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