File - MTI News Writing

January 5, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Arts & Humanities, Writing, Journalism
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Week 8 News Writing

News Quiz #4 English name, class number (1 or 2) and student number In the form of leads with the 6W’s in the correct order 5 news stories from the past week     

International Beat China Xi’an XISU

lcome to the world of Every culture seeks effective constantly evolving, dramatically. The typi urnalism, where ways to spread new reflecting and shaping its newspaper of 1800 wa porters have been information and gossip. In culture. undisciplined mishma gging dirt, raking muck, ancient times, news was Others see it as an legislative proceeding king headlines and written on clay tablets. In inspiring quest for free long-winded essays a adlines for centuries Caesar’s age, Romans read speech, an endless power secondhand gossip. B w. It’s a history full of newsletters compiled by struggle between Authority 1900, a new breed of bloid trash, of slimy correspondents and (trying to control information)tor had emerged. Jour nsationalists, of runkards, handwritten by slaves. and the People (trying to had become big busin deadbeats and mmers” (asWandering minstrels spread learn the truth). Which brings Reporting was becom a Harvard iversity news (and the plague) in the to mind the words of A.J. disciplined craft. And president once scribed Middle Ages. Them came ink Liefling: “Freedom of the newspapers were bec Tim Harrower reporters). on paper. Voices on airwaves. press is guaranteed only to more entertaining and But it’s a history full of Newsreels, Web sites, And htose who own one.” essential than ever, w roes, too: men and 24-hour cable news networks. In the pages ahead, we’ll most of the features w ex men risking their lives Thus when scholars take a quick tour of 600 years today: Snappy headlines, tell stories of war and analyze the rich history of of journalism history, from Comic Sports pages. And agedy, risking prisonment journalism, some view it in hieroglyphics to hypertext: “inverted pyramid” sty to defend terms of technological the media, the message and writing that made stori tig ee speech. And as you progress—for example, the the politics. and newsier. n see here, reports have dramatic impact of bigger, Technical advances and Radio and television come beloved characters faster printing presses. brilliant ideas forged a new brought an end to p culture, too, turning up Others see journalism as a style of journalism. It was a newspapers’ media mono movies, comics and TV specialized form literary century of change, and Why? Well yourself: Wh ows as if guided by an expression, one that’s newspapers changed did yo cult McGraw-Hill hand. © 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Inside Reporting 5

Covering the news

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Covering the news Covering a beat Writing obituaries Covering accidents and disasters Covering fires Covering crime McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering a beat Beat reporters focus on specific topics or institutions  New beat • Do research. • Meet people.

McGraw-Hill

Make lists •Key sources •Upcoming meetings and events •Story ideas

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering accidents and disasters Most editors maintain standards  What is the severity?  How many people are affected?  Is it local?

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering accidents and disasters Writing stories on traffic accidents  Usually lead with WHAT or WHO.  Start with a delayed-identification lead. • Delay naming victims until 2nd or 3rd paragraph. • Distribute key facts logically through first few paragraphs. • Generally no need to identify police by name. McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering accidents and disasters Traffic accident checklist  Victims  Extent of injuries/cause of death  Cause of accident according to police  Location

McGraw-Hill

Time Vehicles Arrests or citations Comments Acts of heroism Relevant facts

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Slide

Covering accidents and disasters When disaster strikes  Arriving on the scene • Go where the action is. • Question authorities. • Talk to victims and eyewitnesses.

McGraw-Hill

• Record details that capture the scene. • Check in often with your editors. • Collaborate.

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering accidents and disasters When disaster strikes  Dealing with victims of a tragedy • Ask permission. • Go slow. • Empathize—but watch what you say.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering fires Fire story checklist Victim names Extent of injuries/cause of death Type of building Location Time

McGraw-Hill

How the fire was discovered Cause of fire Number of fire fighters Estimated cost of damage

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering fires Fire story checklist… Extent of insurance coverage Acts of heroism Weather Effect of fire on evacuees

McGraw-Hill

Plans to relocate victims or rebuild structures Arrests or citations Anecdotes and descriptions Any other unusual aspects

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering fires Organizing stories on fire  Death or injury usually the lead.  Focus on the most compelling aspect.  Cover the aftermath.  May offer opportunity to use narrative storytelling.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering crime Crime writing style and structure  Add color, not clutter.  Avoid sloppy allegations.  Explore chronological story forms. Inverted-pyramid lead Chronology

Kicker McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering crime What you should withhold  Names of minors  Names of victims of sensitive crimes  Names of endangered victims  Labeling people as suspects  Stereotypes

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering crime Homicide or assault story checklist

Victim’s name Extent of injuries/cause of death Location Time Circumstances

McGraw-Hill

 Description of suspect  Name and identification of anyone arrested  Comments  Unusual factors

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering crime Theft story checklist

Type, value of items Description of taken suspect Victim Name and identification of Location anyone arrested Time Comments Circumstances Unusual factors

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering speeches Speeches: Before, during and after  Before

 During

• Research the speaker. • Get a good seat. • Request an advance • Estimate the size of copy of speech. the audience. • Ask if picture- taking • Monitor the mood of will be allowed. the crowd. • Take along a tape recorder.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering speeches Speeches: Before, during and after  After • Create a compelling lead. • Avoid topic leads. • Include minimal background/ biographical data.

McGraw-Hill

• Highlight speaker’s key points. • Convey tone of speech. • Beware of false or libelous comments.

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering speeches Speech story checklist  Speaker’s name

 Description of audience  Relevant credentials  Quotes  Reason for speech  Comments  Time, day and location  Responses

 Speaker’s fee

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering meetings Explain issues, how decisions are made, and what it means  Start with research.  Go early.  Clarify. Condense.  Dress Concentrate. appropriately.  Encourage readers to attend meetings.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering meetings Explain issues, how decisions are made, and what it means  Stick around after the meeting.

McGraw-Hill

 Remember, meetings are not always news.

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering meetings Meeting story checklist

 Group/agency name  Crowd size  Location and length of meeting

 Atmosphere

 Important decisions

 Unusual events

 Quotes

 Reactions

McGraw-Hill

 Graphics  What happens next?

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering meetings Personalizing meetings  Write about real people.

 Write about real issues.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering sports Three most common story types  Game stories  Feature stories • Analysis • Profiles

 Columns

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering sports Game story checklist Final score

 Key statistics

Teams’ names

 Injuries

When and where

 Both teams’ records

Key players and key plays

 What the game means

Quotes

 Other relevant factors

Strategies McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering sports Advance sporting event checklist  Significance of game

 Strategies

 History

 Other factors

 Injuries

 Key players  Records and recent performances  Quotes McGraw-Hill

 Who’s favored  Time, place and ticket information

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering sports Compiling, crunching sport stats    

Conduct solid research. Take careful notes. Use stats selectively. Add charts, graphs or sidebars, if needed.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering sports Sports style  Team name usually plural. Use figures for  High school measurements. athletes are girls Use numerals for scores and boys. and time.  Abbreviate league names.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Covering sports Tips for the sports beat  Covering events  Writing stories • Know the sport. • • Cultivate your sources. • • Ask tough, pointed questions. •

McGraw-Hill

Think plot, not play-byplay. Avoid jargon and clichés. Remember, it’s a game.

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ch. 3 eWorkbook exercises https://highered.mcgrawhill.com/sites/0073378917/student_view0/ chapter3/exercise_3-4_3.html

3.3 POOR

Hayward is recovering from an earthquake that rocked the Bay Area at 8:12 a.m. PDT on Monday morning. Felt from Los Angeles to Redding, the quake appeared centered on a building housing McHenry’s Auto Supply at 2342 Plum St. That building partially collapsed, killing two workers and injuring six others, according to Jennifer Vu, a public information officer from the Hayward Fire Department. The quake appears to have been centered on the Hayward Fault, according to Penny Gertz, a scientist from the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park. The epicenter of the quake, which had a magnitude of 6.4 on the Richter scale, was under the Hayward Hills, Gertz said. Three of the six injured at McHenry’s were hurt seriously enough to require hospitalization at Hayward General Hospital, Vu stated, adding that no other serious injuries have been reported in Hayward. Twenty-one fire personnel, 12 police, and five American Red Cross workers responded to the incident, with some arriving at the scene within four minutes of the collapse, Vu said. Hayward resident Mike Beamer, whose apartment is across the street from McHenry’s, said he felt a rolling motion that lasted for about 30 seconds, with a big jolt coming in the middle. Hayward firefighters used ropes to stabilize the auto supply shop, conducted a search of the building and capped a gas line after detecting a leak at the site. People as far south as Los Angeles and as far north as Redding felt the quake, according to Gertz.  The lead fails to mention the most newsworthy immediate effects of the quake — death, injury and destruction — instead giving us the bland “Hayward is recovering” and the trivial “8:12 a.m. PDT.” The second sentence, which mentions McHenry’s, inaccurately suggests that the quake was “centered” on the building, and still we don’t have any details about what happened there. When we finally get to the deaths, the story possibly misidentifies the dead as “workers” when Vu only identifies them as “people.” They could have been customers or even passersby. From this point on, the details come randomly, with little sense of development or ranking by importance. The

3.3 GOOD

A powerful earthquake struck the San Francisco Bay Area on Monday morning, partially collapsing an auto parts store, killing at least two people and injuring six others. The 8:12 a.m. temblor — felt from Redding to Los Angeles — measured 6.4 on the Richter scale and was centered on the Hayward Fault under the Hayward Hills, according to Penny Gertz, a scientist from the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park. The shaking triggered the partial collapse of McHenry’s Auto Supply at 2342 Plum St., killing two people and injuring six others, according to Jennifer Vu, a public information officer from the Hayward Fire Department. Names of the dead are being withheld pending notification of families, Vu said. Three of those six were hurt seriously enough to require hospitalization and were transported to Hayward General Hospital, according to Vu. She added that no other serious injuries have been reported in Hayward. Mike Beamer, whose apartment is across the street from McHenry’s, said he felt a rolling motion that lasted for about 30 seconds, with a big jolt coming in the middle. “I was eating my breakfast and the room started rolling. I dove under the table just as I heard an explosion outside and a chunk of cement flew through my kitchen window. That’s when the screaming started across the street.” Twenty-one fire personnel, 12 police and five American Red Cross workers responded to the incident, with some arriving at the scene within four minutes of the collapse, Vu said. Hayward firefighters used ropes to stabilize the auto supply shop, conducted a search of the building and capped a gas line after detecting a gas leak at the site.  Much stronger. Notice that the death, injuries and building collapse are in the lead, followed by details suggesting the magnitude of the quake in the second paragraph. From there the story moves into a more detailed look at McHenry’s, the main site of destruction, fleshing out the details on the most significant elements of the story, always organized

4.1 1. Passive Active voice rewrite: Police arrested him as he climbed into the mansion’s window. 2. Passive Active voice rewrite: Understudy Jenny Baker will replace retiring treasurer Bill Habib. 3. Active 4. Passive Active voice rewrite: The employees see the manager as benevolent but demanding. 5. Passive Active voice rewrite: How she said it angered me more than what she said.

4.3 1. 2. 3. 4.

This year’s $20 to $25 tickets were $5 more expensive than last year’s. She must make her college years productive. Marcel’s Café is not one of Seattle’s finest French restaurants. The film’s opening scene offers insight into Gollum’s split personality.

5.Wildlife commissioners worry that building seven salamander tunnels under the road from the lake to Percy Park will bust the project’s budget. 6.Students pack campus buildings on rainy days. 7.Avoid food coloring by buying purple tubers for the potato salad. 8.Some anxious students try to impress their professors with wordy exam answers. 9. Most readers said the article, “In Praise of Brevity,” was biased. 10. The president’s decision not to declare war was surprising.

4.4 1. The scientists at the World Health Organization subjected the data to intense scrutiny scrutinized the data before issuing the alert. 2. If not contained with speed, they warned, the virus could spread exponentially and achieve plague status. 3. The president huddled met with his advisers and then acted with a speed that left shocked his political opponents and the media world shell-shocked. 4. In a surprise move, the president went on the offense and called Congress back into session.

5. Heightening the drama was the fact that he had called them back from midterm holidays amid adverse weather conditions during a storm in Washington. 6. Amid allegations of political opportunism and claims that he had overstepped his authority, the president launched an offensive worked to convince Congress of the urgent need for action. 7. An important part of implementing his strategy was to nullify the impact of decisions enacted by counteracting political operators with hidden agendas. 8. If he didn’t act immediately to empower his allies and forestall his opponents, he knew he later might have to put down a bloody uprising a rebellion by militant members of his own party.

4.5 1. The protest, reportedly organized by pacifists from out of town, began with a rally at the courthouse steps, where speakers of all spots and stripes lambasted the U.S. government for its role in the Iraq War. 2. By 8 p.m. the crowd of 200 or so had warmed to a boil become rowdy and began to show its true colors. 3. Cool as cucumbers, Police waited calmly at the corner of 6th and Broadway, where the two forces eventually met. 4. When one group of demonstrators tried to topple a police car, they discovered they had been playing with a powder keg underestimating the efficiency of the police response.

5. The officers, who were armed to the teeth well-armed, swung into high gear and quickly responded with truncheons and tear gas. 6. Needless to say, The protesters beat a hasty retreat retreated, took to their heels and dispersed, mostly just in the nick of time, with police in hot pursuit. 7. “I’ve never seen so many people run so fast in so many directions,” said Lt. Miguel Cruz, who didn’t seem not worse for the wear for his part in the incident. 8. City officials say they will leave no stone unturned in exploring explore ways to make the demonstrators foot the bill pay for the police response.

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Ch. 4 eWorkbook - Attributions (p.84-5) 1.

“I saw people running. Then a big guy in a yellow hat swerved and smashed into me and I didn’t see anything else,” Szelensky said.

2.

“A newspaper is a device for making the ignorant more ignorant and the crazy crazier,” H.L. Mencken, one of the most famous journalists of his time, said.

3.

“Don’t think of him as a Republican,” said Maria Shriver, who is married to California Gov. Arnold Schwarzeneggar. “Think of him as the man I love, and if that doesn’t work, think of him as the man who can crush you.”

4. “I don’t like ketchup on my eggs one bit,” Dorfman said. “I’m still waiting to hear something that you do like,” Holland said.

5. Michal Smythe, press representative for the company, said the cyclone had wiped out the corporate headquarters. 6. For instance, former CNN reporter Peter Arnett said: “I’m still in shock and awe at being fired.” McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Ch. 4 eWorkbook exercises answers  The attribution should go after the first sentence. 2. Avoid separating the source from “said.” This is one of those awkward attributions that would work better inverted, as in: said H.L. Mencken, one of the most famous journalists of his time. 3. Well-placed and structured attribution.

4. Put the attribution at the beginning of the second quote to avoid suggesting to the reader that Dorfman is still speaking. 5. Correct. 6. It’s acceptable to set up a long quote by putting a colon after the attribution, but this quote is too short to qualify.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Quotes: Punctuation & Attribution p. 92, Test Yourself Exercise #3 a, b, c only

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Slide

AP style practice 1. Joe Java Junior joined the American Automobile Association, just like his father, Joe Java Senior. (3) 2. The reporter said he would meet with the source at the American Broadcasting Company on November 12. (2) 3. The Pres. Of the U.S. lives in the white house at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. (4)

4.The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) official said the U.S. could launch ABM missiles at a moment’s notice. (2) 5.Dr. Andrew Jones, Ph.D in psychology, is a pro-life advocate. (3) 6. The fire department was dispatched to Nine Morningside Boulevard to fight a blaze set by accused arsonist Vern Embers. (3) 7.The Chief of Staff in the President’s Administration admitted he was a homosexual. (3) McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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AP style practice answers  Joe Java Jr. joined the AAA, just like his father, Joe Java Sr.  The reporter said he would meet with the source at ABC on Nov. 12.  The president of the United States lives in the White House at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

The CIA official said the United States could launch ABMs at a moment’s notice. Andrew Jones, who has a doctorate in psychology, is an anti-abortion advocate. The fire department was dispatched to 9 Morningside Blvd. to fight a blaze. The chief of staff in the president’s administration said he was a homosexual. McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Beat Story #1 feedback Refer to page 59 Lead;Nut graph or second paragraph Check for personal pronouns, passive voice, grammar and punctuation problems. Attribution and Quotes Check for accuracy, fairness and balance, redundancy, cliches etc. AP stylebook McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Grammar: Plurals and Possessives 4 Instructions: Please correct the errors in the sentences below. Do not try to avoid the grammar issue by rewriting a sentence. Instead, try to keep the words in the same basic order, but correct the punctuation. 1. The car is the students’. 2. I saw your father at Ricks house. 3. The teacher’s asked the girl’s and boy’s to be quiet. 4. The Detroit Tiger’s baseball team dropped a doubleheader yesterday. 5. The mans son shoveled the walk. McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Grammar answers: Plurals and Possessives The car is the student’s. I saw your father at Rick’s house. The teachers asked the girls and boys to be quiet. The Detroit Tigers baseball team dropped a doubleheader yesterday. The man’s son shoveled the walk.

McGraw-Hill

© 2010 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Week 8 Assignments Read Ch. 6 Only if you received lower than a 70 on the 2nd draft of Beat story #1, you may resubmit it.  Deadline: Monday, May 6 at 8a.m.

1st draft of Beat story #2  Deadline: Wednesday, May 15 at 8a.m.

Some business When you submit assignments using the form, please provide your email address, not mine. Don’t forget to include source’s contact info: email or phone. Bring your textbook and AP stylebook to class every week. Be mindful of deadlines! Reminder: I have office hours every Thu, Fri from 2-4 p.m. in I-304.

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