Key Innovations and Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

April 26, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: History, European History, Europe (1815-1915), Industrial Revolution
Share Embed Donate


Short Description

Download Key Innovations and Inventors of the Industrial Revolution...

Description

Key Innovations and Inventors of  the Industrial Revolution

Nov 18­12:10 PM

1

John Kay's "flying shuttle" With this invention it took  four spinners to keep up  with one cotton loom, and  ten people to prepare yarn  for one weaver. So while  spinners were often busy,  weavers often waited for  yarn. As such, the flying  shuttle effectively doubled  a weaver's production of  cloth  1733 ­ Flying shuttle invented by John Kay 

Nov 18­12:11 PM

2

James Hargreaves' "spinning jenny" In 1764, James Hargreaves  invented the "spinning jenny," a  device which allowed one person  to spin many threads at once,  further increasing the amount of  finished cotton that a worker could  produce. By turning a single  wheel, one could now spin eight  threads at once, a number that was  later increased to eighty. The  thread, unfortunately, was usually  coarse and lacked strength.  Despite this shortcoming, over 20  000 of the machines were in use in  Britain by 1778 

Nov 18­12:18 PM

3

Nov 18­1:01 PM

4

The first steam engine was invented by Thomas Savery and much improved by  Thomas  Newcomen, but Watt later again improved and patented it. The original idea was to put a  vertical piston and cylinder at the end of a pump handle and then to put steam in the  cylinder and condense it with a spray of cold water. The vacuum created allowed  atmospheric pressure to push the piston down, but Watt made it a reciprocating engine,  creating the true steam engine

Nov 18­11:06 AM

5

Nov 18­11:04 AM

6

The Newcomen steam engine used the force of atmospheric  pressure to do the work. Thomas Newcomen's engine pumped  steam into a cylinder. The steam was then condensed by cold  water which created a vacuum on the inside of the cylinder. The  resulting atmospheric pressure operated a piston, creating  downward strokes. In Newcomen's engine the intensity of  pressure was not limited by the pressure of the steam, unlike what  Thomas Savery had patented in 1698. 

Nov 18­11:08 AM

7

James Watt was a Scottish inventor and mechanical  engineer, born in Greenock, who was renowned for  his improvements of the steam engine. In 1765,  James Watt while working for the University of  Glasgow was assigned the task of repairing a  Newcomen engine, which was deemed inefficient  but the best steam engine of its time. That started  the inventor to work on several improvements to  Newcomen's design. 

Watt's engine soon became the dominant design for all modern steam engines and helped bring about the Industrial  Revolution 

Nov 18­11:15 AM

8

Spinning Mill After invention of Steam engine and improved use  of Water Power

Cotton Mill

Nov 3­12:28 PM

9

Robert Fulton's "steamboat" In 1807, Robert Fulton used  steam power to create the  first steamboat, an invention  that would change the way  and the speed in which  materials could be moved  between the colonies of  Britain. In the beginning, the  ship was more expensive to  build and operate than sailing  vessels, but the steamship  had some advantages. It  could take off under its own  power and it was more  steadfast in storms 

Nov 18­12:37 PM

10

Nov 20­10:29 AM

11

1806 ­ 1859

Link to BBC site http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/brunel_kingdom_isambard.shtml

Nov 25­12:10 PM

12

Stephenson's "steam powered train" Finally, in 1814,  Stephenson used  the steam engine to  create a steam  powered train,  which would  eventually allow  increased  communication and  trade between  places before  deemed too far.  Soon, the steam­ powered train had  become an icon of  success throughout  the world  the Rocket was  built in 1825

Nov 18­12:37 PM

13

Inventions in the Textile Industry 1733 ­ Flying shuttle invented by John Kay ­ an improvement to looms that enabled weavers to  weave faster.  1742 ­ Cotton mills were first opened in England.  1764 ­ Spinning jenny invented by James Hargreaves ­ the first machine to improve upon the spinning  wheel.  1764 ­ Water frame invented by Richard Arkwright ­ the first powered textile machine.  1769 ­ Arkwright patented the water frame.  1770 ­ Hargreaves patented the Spinning Jenny.  1773 ­ The first all­cotton textiles were produced in factories.  1779 ­ Crompton invented the spinning mule that allowed for greater control over the weaving  process.  1785 ­ Cartwright patented the power loom. It was improved upon by William Horrocks, known for  his invention of the variable speed batton in 1813.  1787 ­ Cotton goods production had increased 10 fold since 1770.  1789 ­ Samuel Slater brought textile machinery design to the US.  1790 ­ Arkwright built the first steam powered textile factory in Nottingham, England.  1792 ­ Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin ­ a machine that automated the separation of cottonseed  from the short­staple cotton fibre.  1804 ­ Joseph Marie Jacquard invented the Jacquard Loom that weaved complex designs. Jacquard  invented a way of automatically controlling the warp and weft threads on a silk loom by recording  patterns of holes in a string of cards.  1813 ­ William Horrocks invented the variable speed batton (for an improved power loom).  1856 ­ William Perkin invented the first synthetic dye (Bellis ). 

John Bell 2F

Nov 18­12:39 PM

14

Power Loom   1785 This device was invented by  Edmund Cartwright in 1785.  This machine increased weaving  speed, which allowed producing  textile faster

Nov 20­10:04 AM

15

The totality of the changes in economic and social organization that began about 1760 in England  and later in other countries, characterized chiefly by the replacement of hand tools with power­ driven machines, as the power loom and the steam engine, and by the concentration of industry in  large establishments.

At the end of Napoleonic Wars, Britain was producing about one­quarter of the total world  industrial production! The Industrial Revolution is important to the British economic progress because of the various  inventions introduced during the time period. These inventions helped increase productivity, thus  boosting the economy. Below are just some of the important machines invented during that time  period.  James Hargreaves’ spinning jenny revolutionized the textile industry.  Figure 3. The Spinning Jenny. Richard Arkwright’s water frame made it easier to supply power to the machines.  Edmund Cartwright’s power loom introduced easier mechanical weaving.  James Watt’s engine was the first step toward railway transportation.  Transportation was an important aspect of the industrial revolution. The coalmines were  responsible for the first railways in Britain. However, the railways were highly inefficient until  George Stephenson invented a steam engine in 1813.  Figure 4. The inventor of this first efficient locomotive used commercially, the Rocket, was  awarded 500 pounds for his invention.

Nov 18­11:15 AM

16

Share in World  Manufacturing Output:   1750­1900

Nov 20­10:50 AM

17

Rather than just making something, Owen was making the machines that made something. And he was making money. At age 19, Owen was the employer of 500 people. He imported the first bales of Sea Island cotton from the United States to  England and improved the quality of the spun cotton. He and his partners set up the Charlton Twist Co. in 1794. They purchased the New Lanark mills in Scotland from David Dale in  1799. Owen married Dale’s daughter the same year. Dale had been, for his time, a considerate employer who was concerned about the welfare of his child employees  . He wanted Owen to continue this brand of benevolent industrialism, and Owen  agreed with his principles. Dismayed by the living conditions of the company’s employees, Owen quickly established a model village for them, with up­to­date  sanitation. He also instituted sickness and old­age insurance funds. Although Owen continued the common practice of employing child laborers, he created schools for them — about a century ahead  of his time. New Lanark became famous throughout industrialized Europe.

Read More http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2010/05/0514robert­owen­born/#ixzz14F5GKrXW 

http://hubpages.com/hub/Industrial­Revolutions­

Nov 3­12:36 PM

18

View more...

Comments

Copyright � 2017 NANOPDF Inc.
SUPPORT NANOPDF