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March 26, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: History, European History, Renaissance (1330-1550), Feudalism
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Click here to return to Module 9 Causes of the American Revolution Meghan Hassel Normal Community High School Summer 2012

Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. LC-USZ62-9701.

In this learning experience students will use a variety of primary sources, including the Declaration of Independence, to analyze and categorize causes of the American Revolution. Overview/ Materials/LOC Resources/Standards/ Procedures/Evaluation/Rubric/Handouts/Extension

Overview Objectives

Recommended time frame Grade level Curriculum fit Materials

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Students will:  analyze colonial era broadsides to identify causes of the conflict with the British  create posters incorporating primary sources. When combined as a class, the posters will create a timeline of causes of the American Revolution  analyze and re-word in modern language the text of the Declaration of Independence  write an essay describing social, political and economic causes of the American Revolution. 6 days 10th US History  Computers with internet access  Access to the online Primary Source Analysis Tool at the Library of Congress website or hard copies of the document  1 piece of poster board per group  Markers, crayons or colored pencils  Hard copies of the text of the Declaration of Independence for day 5 (or computers with internet access for students)  “Causes of Conflict Between the British and Colonists” worksheet for each student (day 4) Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

 

“Declaration of Independence: Tweet it!” worksheet for each student (day 5) Essay prompt and rubric for each student (day 6)

Common Core Learning Standards

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Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies  CC.9-10.RH.3 Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.  CC.9-10.RH.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.  CC.9-10.RH.5 Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.  CC.9-10.RH.9. Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

Procedures

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Days 1-3:  Students will investigate the causes of the American Revolution. Divide the class into small groups (6 or 12 groups depending on class size). Assign each group a time frame from 1764-1775. If you have 6 groups, assign years according to the timeline sections. If you have 12 groups, assign each group one year.  Depending on previous experience, the teacher may choose to demonstrate how to use the Library of Congress website prior to the next step.  Using computers, each group should access the America During the Age of Revolution, 1764-1775 Timeline. Students should first review the events in their given year(s). Students should then search the collection of broadsides from the era at: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/rbpehtml/ using key words/events from their timeline summary. There are over 200 items in the collection: there are several documents addressing each of the events. Students may find it easier to search the entire Library of Congress Site.  If appropriate for your students, have groups complete the Primary Source Analysis Tool online at the Library of Congress to facilitate understanding of the primary sources  Each group should create a poster documenting colonial grievances and attitudes during their given year(s). Each poster should contain at least 3 quotes directly from primary sources from the collection. Students may include images from the primary source collection. Day 4 Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University



Teacher should introduce the idea that wars have multiple causes. Using a war your students are familiar with, have the class brainstorm social, economic, political and environmental causes for the conflict. Inform students that they will be similarly categorizing causes of the American Revolution. For example using the Persian Gulf War: Economic cause- stability it the Persian Gulf ensures the United States a steady supply of oil. Social cause- Americans were unfamiliar with Islamic culture. Political cause- desire to remove Sadaam Hussein from power and install a democracy. Environmental cause – the US does not have oil.



Hang the group posters on the wall in chronological order. In their groups from the earlier activity, students should rotate from poster to poster. While viewing the other groups posters, students should categorize colonial complaints according to the following categories (see handout “Causes of Conflict between the British and Colonists: ESPeN Grid"): economic, social, political and environmental. While placement of grievances may vary, student should be able to justify their placement.  Reconvene as a group and ask students to summarize their results as the teacher checks for understanding. Day 5  Introduce the concept of the Declaration of Independence as a break up letter between the colonists and King George. Have students activate prior knowledge by giving reasons why people break up.  Pass out a copy of the worksheet “Declaration of IndependenceTweet It!” to each student.  With partners, students will “translate” the grievances listed in the declaration into modern language. Students should access the original text of the Declaration of Independence online or in print form. Assign each partner set several grievances to translate. After reading the primary source text, students should re-write it in Tweet form using modern, everyday language. (If students are unfamiliar with Twitter, show them sample Tweets.)  Partner groups should share their translations with the class. Call on students from other groups to identify if the grievance is economic, social, economic or environmental.  Optional: Announce to students that they will be taking an essay quiz in class the next day on the following prompt: Explain political, social and economic causes that pushed colonists to declare independence. Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

Day 6  Pass out copies of the handout “Essay Quiz- Causes of the American Revolution” to each student or write the prompt on the board.  Students should individually answer the essay prompt below in paragraph form.

Evaluation

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Extension

Students should write a three paragraph essay in response to the following prompt: Explain political, social and economic causes that pushed colonists to declare independence. (See handout and rubric below) Back to Navigation Bar



Students should compare and contrast earlier drafts with the final version of the Declaration of Independence.  Identify 5 important changes in content (students should not for example cite changes in punctuation or simple changes in syntax). Why do you think such changes were made? How do these changes reflect the debates within the Continental Congress?

Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

Primary Resources from the Library of Congress Back to Navigation Bar

Image

Description

Citation

URL

In Congress, July 4, 1776. The unanimous declaration of the thirteen United States of America.

Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Continental Congress & Constitutional Convention Broadsides Collection

http://memory.loc.g ov/cgibin/query/r?ammem/ bdsbib:@field(NUM [email protected](bdsdcc +02101))

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774 - 1875

Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, ed. Worthington C. Ford et al. (Washington, D.C., 1904-37), 5:491.

http://memory.loc.g ov/cgibin/ampage?collId=l ljc&fileName=005/ll jc005.db&recNum= 75

The BLOODY MASSACRE perpetrated in King Street BOSTON on March 5th 1770 by a party of the 29th REGT

Revere, Paul, engraver. "The BLOODY MASSACRE perpetrated in King Street BOSTON on March 5th 1770 by a party of the 29th REGT." 1770. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. LC-USZ62-

http://www.loc.gov/ pictures/resource/pp msca.19159/

Join or Die by Benjamin Franklin

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc .pnp/cph.3a12149

9701.

Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

The Tory Act : published by order of the Continental Congress, Philadelphia, Jan. 2, 1776.

Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Continental Congress & Constitutional Convention Broadsides Collection

http://memory.loc.g ov/cgibin/query/r?ammem/ bdsbib:@field(NUM [email protected](bdsdcc +00801))

Philadelphia. In Congress, December 6, 1775 : We the delegates of the thirteen United Colonies in NorthAmerica, have taken into our most serious consideration a proclamation issued from the Court at St. James's, on the twenty-third day of August last. ... An account of a late military massacre at Boston, or the consequences of quartering troops in a populous town, March 12, 1770. [New York, John Holt, 1770.] A view of the obelisk erected under Liberty-tree in Boston on the rejoicings for the repeal of the ---- Stamp Act 1766.

Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Continental Congress & Constitutional Convention Broadsides Collection

http://memory.loc.g ov/cgibin/query/r?ammem/ bdsbib:@field(NUM [email protected](bdsdcc +007b1))

Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

http://memory.loc.g ov/cgibin/query/r?ammem/ rbpebib:@field(NU [email protected](rbpe +10401000)) http://memory.loc.g ov/cgibin/query/r?ammem/ awhbib:@field(NU [email protected](cph+ 3a23468))

Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1776.

Journals of the Continental Congress, 17741789, ed. Worthington C. Ford et al. (Washington, D.C., 1904-37), 19:320.

American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1766-1.

http://memory.lo c.gov/cgibin/ampage?collI d=lljc&fileName= 004/lljc004.db&r ecNum=319

Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

Rubric Back to Navigation Bar

Rubric: Essay Quiz Causes of the American Revolution Points Earned

Points Possible

Political Causes:

ONE political cause Explanation of the cause SECOND political cause Explanation of the cause Specific example

2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points

Social Causes:

ONE social cause Explanation of the cause SECOND social cause Explanation of the cause Specific example ONE economic cause Explanation of the cause SECOND economic cause Explanation of the cause Specific example Total

2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 2 points 30 points

Economic Causes:

Causes: Award 2 points for each cause that accurate and appropriately fits the category (political, social or economic). Award 1 point for each cause that is accurate but in the incorrect category. Award 0 points for causes that are inaccurate (even if they are in the appropriate category). Explanations: Award 2 points for each accurate explanation of a cause. Award 1 point for a partially correct explanation. Award 0 points if no explanation is provided. Specific Examples: Award 2 points for each accurate specific example. Award 0 points if the example is inaccurate or does not fit the appropriate category.

Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

Handouts Back to Navigation Bar

Causes of Conflict between the British and Colonists ESPeN Grid DIRECTIONS: As you view each of the posters, categorize the causes of conflict between the British and the colonists. Record each complaint and the year below in the appropriate box.

Economic

Social

Causes of Conflict between the British and Colonists

Political

eNvironmental

Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

Declaration of Independence: Tweet It! 1.

THE GRIEVANCES:

A large portion of the Declaration is dedicated to listing the grievances (complaints) against the British government. Carefully READ EACH GRIEVANCE. In the chart below, LIST UNFAMILIAR VOCABULARY. Then, RE-WRITE the complaint as a TWEET using modern words. Make it make sense! For example, the Grievances follow this statement:

Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. Re-worded in modern language: The colonies suffered but now it’s time for change! The King of Great Britain has been unfair. Here’s proof… Vocabulary

TWEET IT! Grievance Re-Written in Modern Words

1.

Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

Essay Quiz: Causes of the American Revolution DIRECTIONS: Answer the following question below in complete sentences on your own piece of paper. Your response should include at least three paragraphs. You will be graded according to the rubric below – be sure to include each of the requirements in your essay. QUESTION: Explain political, social and economic causes that pushed colonists to declare independence. Points Earned Political Causes:

Social Causes:

Economic Causes:

TWO political causes Explanation of each cause Specific example TWO social causes Explanation of each cause Specific example TWO economic causes Explanation of each cause Specific example Total

Teaching with Primary Sources Illinois State University

Points Possible 2 pts each 2 pts each 2 points 2 pts each 2 pts each 2 points 2 pts each 2 pts each 2 points 30 points

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