What the most admired do_12 years of insight

January 29, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Social Science, Sociology, Globalization
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What the most admired do Twelve years of insights

What the most admired do WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

Hay Group has partnered with Fortune magazine for over ten years to identify and rank The World’s Most Admired Companies (WMAC) 

The study not only identifies the companies that are the most admired in their industries, but also uncovers the reasons for their strong reputations



Candidate companies include: Fortune 1,000 companies; non-US companies in Fortune's Global 500 database with revenues of $10 billion or more; and the top non-US international companies operating in the US



Companies are rated both overall and relative to their industry peers by over 10,000 top executives, directors and analysts



Industry rankings are generated for 64 industries (25 international industries and 39 primarily US-market industries)

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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What the most admired do WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs do not follow any particular blueprint, so their success cannot be bought ‘off the shelf’ 

What they do have in common is alignment of: 

corporate culture



attitude of managers



strategy



global coordination



Those that get it right tend to enjoy success over the long-term



They stay at the top because they are constantly building, refining and developing the operating themes through which the company has won its success



Their competitive advantage becomes built into the very fabric of the organization

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Outperforming the market WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

The WMACs study is the only one to shine a light on these companies and give real insights into why they’re so successful, enduring, well-led and packed with talent. This is important because WMACs outperform industry peers and the market as a whole 

Total shareholder returns for the top ten WMACs over the last three years are nearly three times the returns for the Standard and Poor’s 500

18.5%

-7.1%

WMAC

Standard and Poor’s 500

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Consistent highest scorers include industry giants like GE, Coca-Cola, Microsoft, Berkshire Hathaway, Toyota Motor, Johnson & Johnson and Citigroup

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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01 People

Success through people WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs focus on achieving success through people 

This focus on people means: 

they are more likely than their peers to have strategies and metrics related to the management of human capital. WMACs are 19 per cent more likely to provide expertise to the CEO and management on human capital issues



over 80 per cent of WMACs have a human capital strategy that has been reviewed and approved by the board, compared to just under 70 per cent of their peers



their leaders take a ‘hands on’ approach to developing talent. Leaders devote as much as 30 per cent of their time to coaching staff



the boards of the WMACs are strongly oriented towards taking care of human capital. WMACs are 22 per cent more likely to have a human capital strategy that has been reviewed and approved by the board

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Success through people WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs focus on achieving success through people 

This focus on people means: 



they have better plans for CEO and executive succession. Over 90 per cent of WMACs have well defined plans compared to 65 per cent of peer-group companies as a result they are more likely to hire a new CEO from inside the organization – 77 per cent compared to 60 per cent of peer group companies

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

Peer group

WMAC

Well defined plans for CEO and executive succession

More likely to hire a new CEO from inside the organization

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“My main job was developing talent. I was a gardener providing water and other nourishment to our top 750 people. Of course, I had to pull out some weeds, too.” Jack Welch, former CEO of GE, the highest-scoring World’s Most Admired Company

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Succession planning WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

The Most Admired Companies are prepared for the unexpected loss of the CEO or other top executives Peer group

Most Admired

We have developed a comprehensive profile for the CEO’s successor that reflects our strategy and business model

In terms of a CEO successor, our board has a preference for an internal candidate

Our board receives regular updates on development of the internal candidates for top leadership positions 0

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Profound employee engagement WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

The Most Admired Companies are more successful at maintaining high levels of loyalty and motivation during times of economic uncertainty 

They achieve this is by: 

ensuring opportunities for personal advancement and growth are consistently available. Just over 60 per cent of WMACs say planned career assignments are used a great deal compared to 35 per cent of their peers, while 57 per cent say oneto-one coaching is greatly used compared to 22 per cent of their peer group

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

Peer group

WMAC

Planned career assignments are used a great deal

One-to-one coaching is used a great deal

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Profound employee engagement WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

The Most Admired Companies are more successful at maintaining high levels of loyalty and motivation during times of economic uncertainty 

They achieve this is by: 

placing a strong emphasis on reward strategy – 82p per cent of WMACs say they regularly reinforce their reward philosophy in communications with employees, compared to 64 per cent of their peers



making sure they get performance management right



focusing on employee development. The boards of WMACs are 15 per cent more likely to receive regular updates on the development of internal candidates for top leadership positions



creating a culture that motivates and supports employees.

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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02 Strategy

Strategy that gets executed WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs are much more successful than their peers at making their strategies happen 

This has a lot to do with clarity, as our research shows: 

strategic objectives are clearer at all levels of the company. For example, 92 per cent of WMACs say that the business strategy is well communicated to management in the company, compared to 72 per cent of their peers. Furthermore 67 per cent believe it is well communicated to employees, as opposed to 50 per cent of their peers

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

Peer group

WMAC

Business strategy is well communicated to management

Business strategy is well communicated to employees

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Strategy that gets executed WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs are much more successful than their peers at making their strategies happen 

This has a lot to do with clarity, as our research shows: 

performance measures are more closely aligned with strategy



executives are held more accountable for carrying out strategic plans. Just under 80 per cent of WMACs say managers understand their roles in implementing strategy compared to 58 per cent in the peer group



they are less tolerant of ‘off strategy’ behavior to meet financial targets. Only 22 per cent of WMACs say that this type of behavior was tolerated to some or great extent in order to meet the numbers, compared to 52 per cent of their peers



they are more likely to take action if executives do not actively support strategy

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Globalization: WMACs balance global and local approaches WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs show more skill than their peers when it comes to leveraging global scale and local presence 

Here are the reasons why:  good global integration of their operations help them exploit opportunities of scale  local business units are given the flexibility to respond to local market needs. Some 84 per cent of WMACs say they can respond flexibly to local situations, compared with 73 per cent of other companies  knowledge management is used effectively on both a local and global basis. As a result WMACs are good at identify new business practices and leverage them across other business units. Some 78 per cent say they can do this effectively, compared with only 53 per cent in other companies  good international coordination means even far-flung business units are united around a common strategic vision  they ensure local managers are prepared to sacrifice local priorities to benefit the global enterprise  compensation strategies are generally centralized, enabling a global approach to talent management

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Charting a course for success WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

What makes WMACs special is the distinctive way that they manage their organizations 

They build strategies that work through good times and bad, helping them avoid the distractions that trap their peers when business cycles turn. For example, Southwest Airlines has not altered its strategy for almost 40 years!



There is no single best organizational structure for WMACs, but their structure is always aligned to the strategy and to the business model



They have more focus on the operating model than their peers. They build in flexibility and ensure the model is made visible across the organization



They are better at equipping leaders. They identify, develop and reward leaders who are successful at working across the organization. As a result, 83 per cent of WMAC executives feel that they manage the matrix organization effectively, compared to only 58 per cent of the peer group

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Toyota takes its competitors on plant tours, confident that no one is going to be able to reproduce excellence that has been painstakingly built over many years

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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03 Culture

Strong organizational culture WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

Organizational cultures are important drivers of employee behavior and WMACs display a different cultural profile to their peers 

Their leaders tend to have a consistent, shared understanding both of what the company’s culture is at present and where it should go in the future



Their cultures promote both individual initiative and high levels of teamwork



This combination of individual initiative and teamwork is used to drive innovation and employee loyalty



For the WMACs, it is crucial that employees mesh with their culture.

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Vision and culture WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

For global leaders, vision and culture are key to integration of operations Peer group

Most Admired

We have succeeded in aligning our various business units/subsidiaries around a common strategic vision

We have succeeded in aligning our various business units/subsidiaries around a common corporate culture

We are effective in communicating changes in /strategic direction and corporate policies procedures to business unit/subsidiary managers 0

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Long-term focus WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs are more focused on the future than their peers 

Our research highlights a number of ways in which this manifests itself in their behavior: 

their performance measures are structured to focus on the long term. For example, WMACs are 56 per cent more likely to have performance measures based on building customer loyalty



compromising long-term objectives for the sake of short-term demands is frowned upon



they take a long-term approach to talent management. For example, the boards of WMACs are 23 per cent more likely to evaluate CEOs on success in developing human capital, in addition to evaluating financial outcomes and strategy implementation



even in stormy economic conditions they continue to hold to their long-term objectives

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Managed innovation WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

WMACs excel at innovation because they actively manage it to ensure that the best ideas make it to market 

At WMACs, innovation starts at the top because their leaders: 

direct innovation and establish a culture in which it can flourish. For example, they are more patient with promising ideas that fail to generate immediate returns



promote high levels of initiative. The organizational culture in WMACs supports empowerment and risk taking and their performance management systems are designed to reward innovative activity



encourage cross-functional teamwork that ensures best practices are used across the organization. For example, 30 per cent of WMACs say they are very effective at exchanging leadership practices between business units, compared to 23 per cent of their peers



WMACs also continually look to reinvent themselves and thus frequently address potential problems before they occur



Rather than exploring completely new areas, they often innovate in areas where they’re already strong

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Innovation through empowerment WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

Innovation: empowerment promotes innovative behavior Peer group

Most Admired

Decisions are generally made at the right level ie where the most appropriate knowledge( )and expertise resides

Managers are given the decision-making authority necessary to carry out their responsibilities

Staffing levels are adequate to ensure that managers and employees have sufficient time to pursue and develop innovative ideas 0

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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04 Reward

Unlocking reward effectiveness WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

Our research shows WMACs achieve a better return on their reward program investments than their peers and as a result actually end up paying about five per cent less for talent 

They get more mileage out of their reward programs, because they:  ensure reward strategies are clearly aligned with organization goals, strategy and culture  tend to take a more centralized approach to reward strategy  have stronger talent development programs and processes that encourage the internal sourcing of candidates. This is one reason why they pay about five per cent less in base pay for management and professional positions  focus on executional excellence in reward programs, not sophisticated design

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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Unlocking reward effectiveness WHAT THE MOST ADMIRED DO — TWELVE YEARS OF INSIGHTS

Our research shows WMACs achieve a better return on their reward program investments than their peers and as a result actually end up paying about five per cent less for talent 

They get more mileage out of their reward programs, because they:  promote a ‘total rewards’ view across the organization and leverage an array of intangible rewards. As a result:  74 per cent of WMACs state that their employees understand and appreciate that rewards consist of both tangible and intangible components, compared with 61 per cent of their peers  engage line managers in the rollout of reward programs and do a better job of communicating reward strategies.  For example, 82 per cent of WMACs regularly reinforce their reward philosophy in communications with employees, while only 64 per cent of peer companies do the same

© 2009 Hay Group. All rights reserved

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