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January 5, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: History, World History, Aztec
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Chapter 5 – Early History of the Americas Section Notes

Video

The Maya The Aztecs The Incas

Impact of Mayan Achievements on Math and Astronomy

Maps Close-up Palenque Tenochtitlán

Quick Facts Chapter 5 Visual Summary

Maya Civilization, c. 900 The Aztec Empire, 1519 The Inca Empire, 1530 Early History of the Americas Early Civilizations of the Americas

Images

The Maya The Aztecs Incas Inca Farmers

The Maya The Big Idea The Maya developed an advanced civilization that thrived in Mesoamerica from about 250 until the 900s. Main Ideas • Geography helped shape the lives of the early Maya.

• During the Classic Age, the Maya built great cities linked by trade. • Maya culture included a strict social structure, a religion with many gods, and achievements in science and the arts. • The decline of Maya civilization began in the 900s.

Main Idea 1: Geography helped shape the lives of the early Maya. • The Maya civilization established itself in Mesoamerica from 1000 BC onward. • They cleared forests to grow beans, squash, avocados, and maize, or corn. • The Maya also hunted forest animals such as deer, rabbits, and monkeys. • The early Maya lived in small, isolated villages that grew in size as trade increased. • By AD 200 the Maya had begun to build large cities.

Main Idea 2: During the Classic Age, the Maya built great cities linked by trade. • The Classic Age occurred between AD 250 and 900. • During this age, Maya territory included over 40 large cities. • Each city had its own king and government. There was no single ruler over the empire.

City Life Trade

Architecture

Sports

• People exchanged goods for products not available locally.

• The Maya had grand, decorated palaces.

• Every city had a stone court to play ball games.

• They built stone pyramids with temples.

• The winners of the games received jewels and clothing.

• The highlands received cotton and cacao from the lowlands. • The lowlands received valuable stones from the highlands.

• A temple in the city of Palenque honors the achievements of the king Pacal. • The Maya built large canals and plazas.

• The losers were often killed.

Main Idea 3: Maya culture included a strict social structure, a religion with many gods, and achievements in science and the arts. Social Structure • The king, thought to be related to the gods, held the highest position. • The upper classes included priests, rich merchants, and noble warriors. • The lower class was made up of farming families who lived outside the city. • These families had to “pay” rulers with part of their crop. • Men captured in battle became slaves.

Religion • The Maya worshipped many gods. • Each god controlled a different aspect of life.

• The Maya pleased their gods by offering blood through body piercing or human sacrifice.

Achievements • The Maya built large observatories to study the sky and plan a calendar. • They developed a 365-day calendar for farming, more accurate than the European calendar, and a 260-day calendar for religious events. • They were good mathematicians – among the first people to develop a symbol for zero. • They developed a writing system that included both sounds and objects. • Their art and architecture were created without the use of metal tools.

Main Idea 4: The Decline of Maya Civilization began in the 900s. • Around AD 900 the Maya moved out of cities to the countryside. • Historians think a number of factors caused this decline including: – The common people, overburdened by the kings, may have rebelled. – Increased war between the cities might have disrupted trade and caused people to flee the cities. – The Maya might have not been able to produce enough food to feed everyone. – Droughts might have decreased food supply.

• The Maya civilization did not disappear entirely and was later revived in the Yucatán Peninsula.

The Aztecs The Big Idea The strong Aztec Empire, founded in central Mexico in 1325, lasted until the Spanish conquest in 1521. Main Ideas • The Aztecs built a rich and powerful empire in central Mexico. • Social structure, religion, and warfare shaped life in the empire. • Hernán Cortés conquered the Aztec Empire in 1521.

Main Idea 1: The Aztecs built a rich and powerful empire in central Mexico. •

In 1325, Aztecs migrated south to central Mexico and settled on a swampy island in Lake Texcoco.



The Aztecs rose to power by waging war and demanding tribute from conquered people.



The Aztecs controlled a huge trade network.



By the early 1400s, the Aztecs ruled the most powerful state in Mesoamerica with Tenochtitlán as their capital.



The Aztecs built canals and three causeways—raised roads across water or wet ground—to make travel easier.



To increase the amount of farmland, the Aztecs created floating gardens.



Tenochtitlán was home to some 200,000 people at its height.

Main Idea 2: Social structure, religion, and warfare shaped life in the empire. • Held the most important position is society Emperor

Nobles

• Attended to law, trade, tribute, and warfare • Served king as tax collectors, judges, and other government officials • Noble positions were passed down from father to son.

Warriors and Priests

• Priests more influential than warriors

• Led religious ceremonies and decided when to plant and harvest

Social Structure, continued

Merchants and Artisans

Farmers and Laborers

Slaves

• Held the position in society below the priests and warriors • Made up the majority of the population

• Didn’t own their lands

• At the bottom of society

Social Structure, continued Religion and Warfare • The Aztecs worshipped many gods. • They made as many as 10,000 human sacrifices per year.

• Most victims were battle captives or slaves. • Priests led bloody ritual ceremonies. • The Aztecs fought wars to supply enough victims for sacrifice.

Cultural Achievements • The Aztecs created stone pyramids, statues, jewelry and masks. • Women wore embroidered cloth.

• The Aztec studied the stars and created a calendar similar to the Maya’s. • They recorded historical and cultural events. • They had strong oral tradition.

Main Idea 3: Hernán Cortés conquered the Aztec Empire in 1521. • In the late 1400s the Spanish arrived, seeking riches and converts to Catholicism. • Hernán Cortés led the conquistadors, or Spanish conquerors, in 1519. • The Aztec emperor Moctezuma II believed Cortés to be the god Quetzalcoatl and gave the Spanish gold. • Cortés took the emperor prisoner. • The Aztec drove out conquistadors, but Moctezuma was killed. • Within a year, the conquistadors returned and conquered the Aztec by 1521.

Why the Conquistadors Succeeded

• They had help from people who resented harsh Aztec rule. • They used better weapons, including armor, cannons, and swords, and had big horses that terrified the Aztecs. • They spread disease that killed thousands of Aztecs.

The Incas The Big Idea

The Incas controlled a huge empire in South America, but it was conquered by the Spanish. Main Ideas • The Incas created an empire with a strong central government in South America. • Life in the Inca Empire was influenced by social structure, religion, and the Incas’ cultural achievements. • Francisco Pizarro conquered the Incas and took control of the region in 1537.

Main Idea 1: The Incas created an empire with a strong central government in South America. • The Incas began as a small tribe in the Andes with Cuzco as their capital. • From the mid-1400s, Pachacuti and other leaders expanded Inca territory. • By early 1500s, the Inca Empire spread from Ecuador to central Chile and included about 12 million people.

Strong Central Government Central Rule • Pachacuti replaced local leaders with his own officials. • Children of conquered leaders were educated at Cuzco and sent back to teach and govern their villages. • All business was done in the Inca’s official language, Quechua.

Well-Organized Economy • Each household was told what to do. • The Inca developed a labor tax system, mita, in which – Farmers tended their own and government land. – Villagers made goods for soldiers. – Incas worked building roads, in mines, or as soldiers.

• The Inca had no merchants.

• The government distributed goods and stored extra in the capital.

Main Idea 2: Life in the Inca Empire was influenced by social structure, religion, and the Incas’ cultural achievements. Upper Classes

Lower Classes



Included the emperor, government officials, and priests



Lived in stone houses and wore the best clothes



Did not have to pay labor tax and had other privileges



Included farmers, artisans, and servants, but not slaves because there were none



Grew crops such as maize, peanuts, and potatoes



Raised llamas for wool and meat in the Andes



Dressed in plain clothes and could not own more goods than they needed to survive

Life in the Inca Empire Religion

Achievements

• The Incas believed their kings were related to the sun god.

• The Incas are known for their expert masonry, or stonework.

• The Incas sacrificed llamas, cloth, food, and only rarely humans.

• The Incas made pottery, gold and silver jewelry, and fine textiles.

• People outside Cuzco worshiped other gods and believed certain places had magical powers.

• The Incas had no writing system, but recorded information through cords known as quipus. • The Incas had an oral tradition that was written down after the conquistadors arrived.

Main Idea 3: Francisco Pizarro conquered the Incas and took control of the region in 1537. • In the late 1520s, a civil war began when the two sons of the ruler fought for the throne. • 1532: Atahualpa defeated his brother, but the Inca army was weakened. • Atahualpa went to meet a band of 180 Spanish soldiers, led by Francisco Pizarro, that had arrived in the empire. • The Spanish launched a surprise attack. – Captured Atahualpa – Killed thousands of Inca soldiers

• The Incas filled a room of silver and gold for the Spanish, asking for the release of Atahualpa. The Spanish killed him instead. • Some Inca continued to fight, but Pizarro defeated them in 1537. • The Spanish ruled the region for the next 300 years.

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