Social Studies - Chagrin Falls Exempted Village Schools

March 17, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Social Science, Political Science, Government
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SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE OF STUDY 2008

CHAGRIN FALLS EXEMPTED VILLAGE SCHOOLS 400 East Washington Street Chagrin Falls, Ohio 44022

THE SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE OF STUDY has been approved by the Chagrin Falls Board of Education on April 21, 2008 Resolution #08-031 And revised on June 20, 2011 (addition of AP Micro/Macroeconomics) Resolution #11-039

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The development of the Social Studies Course of Study reflects the collaborative efforts of Chagrin Falls School District teaching professionals. Developing and revising of this Course of Study entailed a commitment of time, collaboration and cooperation of all members. The writing of this document was the result of a five-year cycle of work that included lesson study, study groups and action research. The dedication of the members of this review team and those that assisted these members is deeply appreciated. Special thanks are given to the following: John Brownlow, Chagrin Falls High School and 7 – 12 Social Studies Department Chair Katherine Adick, Chagrin Falls Intermediate School Christine Bauer, Chagrin Falls Middle School Lisa Dugach, Gurney Elementary School Daniel Ehrenbeit, Chagrin Falls High School Julie Greene, Gurney Elementary School Johna Indriolo-Graziani, Chagrin Falls Middle School Bradley Jones, Gurney Elementary School Brian McKenna, Chagrin Falls High School Coreene McNamara, Chagrin Falls Intermediate School Michael Murphey, Gurney Elementary School Joanne Nidy, Chagrin Falls Intermediate School Michael Salyers, Chagrin Falls High School James Serluco, Chagrin Falls High School Robert W. Hunt Assistant Superintendent Chuck Murphy, Principal Chagrin Falls Intermediate School

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Social Studies Education Table of Contents Page Chagrin Falls Exempted Village School District Philosophy ........................................................................................1 Chagrin Falls Exempted Village School District Goals ................................................................................................2 Organization of Social Studies Education Course of Study ..........................................................................................4 Social Studies Education Philosophy.............................................................................................................................5 Social Studies Education Academic Content Standards ................................................................................................6 Kindergarten ..................................................................................................................................................................7 Grade 1 .........................................................................................................................................................................16 Grade 2 .........................................................................................................................................................................30 Grade 3 .........................................................................................................................................................................45 Grade 4 .........................................................................................................................................................................61 Grade 5 .........................................................................................................................................................................73 Grade 6 .........................................................................................................................................................................96 Grade 7 .......................................................................................................................................................................107 Grade 8 .......................................................................................................................................................................147 World History ............................................................................................................................................................163

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United States History .................................................................................................................................................174 United States Government .........................................................................................................................................189 Economics ..................................................................................................................................................................199 Sociology ...................................................................................................................................................................214 Psychology .................................................................................................................................................................228 Philosophy..................................................................................................................................................................234 Advanced Placement Psychology ..............................................................................................................................240 Advanced Placement United States History (Semester I)..........................................................................................248 Advanced Placement United States History (Semester II) ........................................................................................257 Advanced Placement United States Government ......................................................................................................263 Advanced Placement Micro/Macroeconomics ..........................................................................................................272 Social Studies Education Evaluation .........................................................................................................................277 Chagrin Falls School District Curriculum Study Cycle .............................................................................................278

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PHILOSOPHY OF THE CHAGRIN FALLS EXEMPTED VILLAGE SCHOOLS Education is a lifelong process. We, the Chagrin Falls Board of Education, as the elected body being legally responsible for the public school portion of that education, subscribe to the following philosophy: We recognize an obligation to organize and administer the educational program in a manner compatible with a democratic society. We recognize that the unique responsibility of the schools is to pass along a fund of knowledge; and in order to meet this goal, to provide enriched conditions which foster academic excellence and individual growth. We recognize that all persons in our school community have rights and responsibilities that are inherent within that society. We believe that our school system should educate toward responsibility and responsiveness. We recognize that students differ in their physical, intellectual, emotional, and social growth and in the way they develop these aspects. We believe that the school must play a primary role in the students' education and that educational goals grow out of the needs of individuals. We believe that students bring together different abilities, talents, and backgrounds. Intellectual growth will flourish in an environment of trust, respect, and teamwork. The school should strive to heighten the students' appreciation of the cultural and individual diversity within the human family. We believe that students need the freedom to question and should be encouraged to use independent, reflective, and critical thinking. They should have the opportunity to exercise independent judgment by making decisions about their education in addition to following standardized requirements. We believe that students should understand their relationship to the community, the country, and to the world. Our schools should provide meaningful opportunities for students to become familiar with, and react to, a segment of society outside of their own community. We believe the education received in Chagrin Falls should fit the students' needs for supporting themselves in the future by preparing for further academic study and vocational opportunities. We believe objectives and procedures of all educational programs are dynamic rather than static and must change to meet new conditions in an ever-changing world. We should consider changes in the educational program because of their demonstrated worth.

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CHAGRIN FALLS EXEMPTED VILLAGE SCHOOLS DISTRICT GOALS The Chagrin Falls Board of Education is committed to quality education as its top priority. The mission of the Chagrin Falls Schools is to provide a comprehensive range of learning opportunities through which students, staff and community, in partnership, can develop each student’s knowledge, confidence and responsibility leading to individual success and lifelong learning. The Board defines a quality education as one that prepares the student to compete effectively in any chosen endeavor. Consideration will be given to the academic, social, cultural, physical, practical and emotional development of students in an integrated effort to equip them with a set of functional life skills. The Chagrin Falls Board of Education will establish district goals, set policy, monitor progress, and prioritize its instructional, human, and financial resources to ensure accomplishment of its educational mission and defines the following goals: 



Establish standards for student achievement in the areas of: 

Achievement relative to ability;



Identification and achievement of personal goals and feelings of positive self-worth in each student;



Development of an understanding of the world, its people and the student's role and responsibilities toward others;



Development of well-rounded individuals;



Development and implementation of marketing strategies to assure district competitiveness in the areas of college acceptance and other post-secondary options;



Academic and social behaviors that support student achievement;



Technology.

Establish standards of teacher effectiveness in the areas of: 

Professional and personal growth;



Development and implementation of stimulating lessons;



Development and use of articulate and correct language in all phases of student and employee communication;



Instruction encompassing higher-level thinking and problem-solving skills for all students;



Integration of curricula;



Identification of individual learning styles and adaptation of teaching methods in order to reach all students.

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Establish a plan and allocate sufficient resources to provide support services for the educational mission, including: 

A safe environment;



An efficient transportation system;



Healthy and appetizing food service;



Professional development of classified employees;



Up-to-date instructional equipment and supplies;



Specialized services to meet individual student requirements.

Establish a long-term facility plan to ensure:







Facilities that will enhance the educational program;



Maintenance and preservation of the community's investment in district facilities, grounds and equipment.

Establish working relationships and communication networks within the community to ensure: 

Identification of citizen, Board, parent, and student educational goals;



Commitment of citizens, Board, parents and students to ongoing support of the educational mission of the schools.

Establish standards for administrator effectiveness in the areas of: 

Fiscal management;



Personnel recruitment and development;



Policy development;



Curriculum development and coordination;



Implementation of district goals;



Appropriate educational offerings for all students;



Effective communications with all sectors of the school community.

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ORGANIZATION OF THE SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE OF STUDY The Social Studies Course of Study is divided into grade levels and courses. In grades K – 8 and the secondary courses that are not advanced placement, the document includes Benchmarks, Indicators, Reference Code and Clarifications (Skills, Methods, Resources, and Connections). These Benchmarks and Indicators derive from the Ohio Academic Content Standards for Social Studies (2003). The Benchmarks column is the big idea or major concept that students should understand. The Indicators delineate the understandings students need to build the major concept (Benchmark). Leading Ohio social studies educators developed the Standards to guide curriculum expectations. These Standards will serve as the foundation for instruction and assessment within our district. The Benchmarks and Indicators that come from the Ohio Standards are noted with symbols in the Reference (REF.) column. The first line of upper case letters refers to the content Standard (e.g. PS = People in Societies). On the next line, the upper case letter represents the Benchmark as it is organized in the state document. The first number on the next line is the grade level at which the Indicator appears in the Ohio document. The second number is the state Indicator, as it is organized within the state Benchmark. The Indicators that do not have references are those originated by the Chagrin Falls staff that incorporate valuable understandings not included in the Ohio Standards. Due to a dramatic increase in advanced placement testing and a perception of a drop in academic rigor, the College Board instituted the Advanced Placement Audit in 2007. Teachers were required to submit an extensive syllabus demonstrating alignment and an appropriate level of academic rigor. This document reflects the information that was developed by our advanced placement teachers and approved by the College Board. The Clarification column provides information related to its adjoining Indicator. The information generally serves one of these purposes: (1) provides lesson ideas and Indicator reconceptualization, (2) provides relevant instructional resources, or (3) identifies 21st century skills that can be interjected into the lesson. This document will serve as an important resource for lesson development, delivery and assessment.

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PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL STUDIES COURSE OF STUDY

The social studies program in the Chagrin Falls Exempted Village School District is developed to assist students in becoming contributing citizens in a democratic society within a changing world. Students will be challenged to expand their horizons, understanding their role locally, nationally and internationally and striving to become active participants within each of these realms. The social studies program explores the relationship of the past to the present, and the impact of the present on the future. Historical knowledge is enhanced by the students’ study of sociology, psychology, economics, geography and government in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the global society. There are three essential components of the social studies program: (1) findings: facts, concepts, generalizations and theories social scientists produce on their quest for knowledge; (2) processes and techniques social scientists use to validate their findings; and (3) embedding 21st century content and development of skills throughout grade levels to best prepare students for our ever changing world. Students learn facts and concepts to utilize information to broaden their understanding of life, recognize the changing conditions of society and seek solutions to local, national and global problems.

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Ohio Department of Education K-12 Social Studies Academic Content Standards History (H) Students use materials drawn from the diversity of human experience to analyze and interpret significant events, patterns and themes in the history of Ohio, the United States and the world. People in Societies (PS) Students use knowledge of perspectives, practices and products of cultural, ethnic and social groups to analyze the impact of their commonality and diversity within local, national, regional and global settings. Geography (GEO) Students use knowledge of geographic locations, patterns and processes to show the interrelationship between the physical environment and human activity, and to explain the interactions that occur in an increasingly interdependent world. Economics (E) Students use economic reasoning skills and knowledge of major economic concepts, issues and systems in order to make informed choices as producers, consumers, savers, investors, workers and citizens in an interdependent world. Government (GVT) Students use knowledge of the purposes, structures and processes of political systems at the local, state, national and international levels to understand that people create systems of government as structures of power and authority to provide order, maintain stability and promote the general welfare. Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities (CRR) Students use knowledge of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in order to examine and evaluate civic ideals and to participate in community life and the American democratic system. Social Studies Skills and Methods (SM) Students collect, organize, evaluate and synthesize information from multiple sources to draw logical conclusions. Students communicate this information using appropriate social studies terminology in oral, written or multimedia form and apply what they have learned to societal issues in simulated or real-world settings.

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KINDERGARTEN

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Use a calendar to determine the day, week, month and year.

INDICATOR 1. Recite the days of the week.

H A K.1

Lesson Ideas:  Daily calendar activities, days of the week song, word sorts, students create a calendar, read alouds Technology: create calendar in Kid Pix; create individual calendar in Edmark (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance), online interactive calendars http://www.apples4theteacher.com/calendar.html (click on website links as directed by the teacher) Resources: Cookie’s Week by Cindy Ward and Tomie DePaola; The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle; Today is Monday by Eric Carle; Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks Cross Curriculum: science (daily observations, butterfly unit), math (calendar updates), language arts (word sorts, poetry and read alouds)

Place events in correct order on a time line.

2. Use vocabulary associated with time to distinguish broad categories of historical time such as long ago, yesterday, today and tomorrow.

H B K.2

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas:  Daily calendar activities, morning meeting activities, sorting activities (now vs. then) Early Settlers and Native Americans Technology: create calendar in Kid Pix; create individual calendar in Edmark (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: calendar cards (today, tomorrow, yesterday); field trip to Western Reserve Historical Society (Early Settlers and Native Americans); Ox Cart Man, Johnny Appleseed Cross Curriculum: science (weather observations and four seasons), math (calendar updates)

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3. Demonstrate understanding of one’s own personal life history (e.g., birth, toddler and preschool).

H B K.3

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas:  Class discussions, show and tell, All About Me posters, student of the week presentations, writing minilessons/writer’s workshop Technology: create basic timeline in Kid Pix (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: The End (poem by A.A. Milne); It’s Hard to Be Five by Jamie Lee Curtis; When I was Little by Jamie Lee Curtis Cross Curriculum: Language Arts (writing, sequencing, read alouds) 21st Century Skills: Health and Wellness Awareness; Communication and Information Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Recognize that the actions of individuals make a difference, and relate the stories of people from diverse backgrounds who have contributed to the heritage of the United States. "

INDICATOR 4. Recognize state and federal holidays and explain their significance.

H D K.4

Lesson Ideas:  Class discussions, read alouds, monthly calendar activities (Labor Day, Veteran’s Day, Constitution Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday, President’s Day, Memorial Day), poetry folder poems Technology: Kid Pix stamps, www.kids.gov (click on website links as directed by the teacher) Resources: My Brother Martin; presidential biographies, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com Cross Curriculum: math (calendar), language arts (poetry and informational texts)

5. Listen to and discuss songs, poetry, literature and drama that reflect the cultural heritages of the people of the United States.

H D K.5

21st Century Skills: Civic Literacy Lesson Ideas:  Poetry folder poems, Johnny Appleseed, parent volunteer lessons regarding holiday celebrations, read alouds of variety of nursery rhymes, legends and folktales Technology: click on website links as directed by the teacher Resources: Western Reserve Historical Society field trip; The Color of Us by Karen Katz; Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman; Ox Cart Man; Who is John Chapman? by Patsy Bevcar, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com Cross Curriculum: Music class, language arts (informational text) 21st Century Skills: Global Awareness, Adaptability

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Identify practices and 6. Identify ways that products of diverse individuals in the family, cultures. school and community are unique and ways that they are the same.

Identify ways that different cultures within the United States and the world have shaped our national heritage.

7. Identify different cultures through the study of holidays, customs and traditions utilizing language, stories, folktales, music and the arts.

PS A K.1

Lesson Ideas:  Class discussions, read alouds, All About Me posters, student of the week, show and tell, Venn diagrams, special guests from community Technology: video clips www.unitedstreaming.com (click on website links as directed by the teacher) Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks; Whoever You Are by Mem Fox; non-fiction leveled readers; We are All Alike, We are all Different; video clips www.unitedstreaming.com

PS B K.2

Cross Curriculum: science (compare/contrast), language arts (informational text) 21st Century Skills: Global Awareness, Adaptability Lesson Ideas:  Parent presentations, read alouds, show and tell, Student of the Week, All About Me posters (e.g. Hanukkah, Christmas, New Year, Kwanzaa), Gingerbread Man unit, nursery rhymes, legends, folktales Technology: Resources: different versions of Gingerbread Man; Light the Lights; Runaway Latke; dreidel game Cross Curriculum: math (counting), writing (Venn diagrams), music 21st Century Skills: Global Awareness

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK GEOGRAPHY Identify the location of the state of Ohio, the United States, the continents and oceans on maps, globes and other geographic representations.

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INDICATOR 8. Identify and correctly use terms related to location, direction and distance including: a. Up/Down; b. Over/Under; c. Here/There; d. Front/Back; e. Behind/In front of. 9. Recite home address.

GEO A K.1

Lesson Ideas:  Simon Says, mapping the classroom, mapping students bedroom, Mr. Origin location activities, Kid Pix scene creation, morning meeting activities Technology: Using Kid Pix, create a background scene to manipulate a piece using the direction/distance words (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: “Where is the Apple” student book, Me on the Map by Joan Sweeny; My Map Book by Sara Fanelli; Little Red Riding Hood; Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks Cross Curriculum: Physical Education (Simon Says), math (location words, mapping)

GEO A K.2

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas:  Create class phone/address book; address name tags; Kid Pix to create page of house with address listed, Special Helper interview Technology: Kid Pix create your house (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: A House is a House for Me by Mary Ann Hoberman Cross Curriculum: math (number identification, mapping)

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10. Make models and maps representing real places including the classroom.

GEO A K.3

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas:  Mapping the classroom, mapping students bedroom, KidPix creation of room Technology: Create a map in Kid Pix (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance), online maps, www.kids.gov (click on website links as directed by the teacher) Resources: Me on the Map by Joan Sweeny; My Map Book by Sara Fanelli, www.kids.gov Cross Curriculum: math (mapping), Art (Van Gogh piece)

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11. Distinguish between land and water on maps and globes.

GEO A K.4

21st Century Skills: Creativity and Innovation Skills Lesson Ideas:  Class discussions, students independent work sheet coloring water and land on a map, Native American/Early Settler unit Technology: internet websites, online interactive maps (click on website links as directed by the teacher) Resources: globes, maps, internet, non-fiction read alouds, atlas, http://www.scholastic.com/scholastic_thanksgiving website Cross Curriculum: science (observations), math (mapping) 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking, Global Awareness

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Identify physical and 12. Demonstrate human features of familiarity with the places. school’s layout.

GEO B K.5

Lesson Ideas:  First day tours, daily tasks and activities, traveling to specials, gingerbread scavenger hunts, Kindergarten orientation Technology: create map in Kid Pix (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks; Gurney maps Cross Curriculum: math (mapping)

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13. Describe the immediate surroundings of home (e.g., streets, buildings, fields, woods or lakes).

GEO B K.6

21st Century Skills: Personal Responsibility, Leadership Lesson Ideas:  Draw picture and discuss, class discussions, show and tell presentations, read alouds, Native America and Early Settlers unit Technology: Kid Pix creation (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: A House is a House for Me by Mary Ann Hoberman, maps, atlas Cross Curriculum: science (observational skills), math (mapping)

Explain how environmental processes influence human activity and ways humans depend on and adapt to the environment. ECONOMICS Explain how the scarcity of resources requires people to make choices to satisfy their wants.

14. Identify key natural resources that are used in the students’ daily lives.

GEO C K.7

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas:  Earth Day, classroom recycling activities, science journal brainstorming Technology: Interactive Technology sorting activity Resources: Newbridge Discovery Link non-fiction readers; Water by Frank Asch Cross Curriculum: science (West Woods trip, daily observational skills) 21st Century Skills: Personal Responsibility; Life Skills

15. Recognize that people have many wants.

E A K.1

Lesson Ideas:  Wants vs. needs vs. wishes; Early Settlers and Native Americans; Little Red Hen Technology: Interactive Technology sorting activity, Kidspiration template sort, sequencing activities (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: (Numeroff series) If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, If You Give a Pig a Pancake; If You Give a Moose a Muffin; Little Red Hen; Ox Cart Man; Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins; Bennies Pennies Cross Curriculum: language arts (retelling, sequencing, patterns in text, predictions), math (patterns, counting, partitioning) 21st Century Skills: Accountability, Personal Responsibility, Ethics

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Explain how the 16. Explain how people scarcity of resources make decisions in order requires people to to satisfy their wants. make choices to satisfy their wants. (cont.)

E A K.2

Lesson Ideas:  Wants vs. needs vs. wishes; Early Settlers and Native Americans; Little Red Hen Technology: Interactive Technology sorting and sequencing activities Resources: If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, If You Give a Pig a Pancake; If You Give a Moose a Muffin; Little Red Hen; Ox Cart Man; Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins; Bennies Pennies Cross Curriculum: math (patterns, counting, partitioning), language arts (retelling, sequencing, patterns in text, predictions)

Distinguish between goods and services and explain how people can be both buyers and sellers of goods and services.

17. Identify goods and services.

E B K.3

21st Century Skills: Accountability, Personal Responsibility, Ethics Lesson Ideas:  Early Settlers/Native Americans unit, developing a recipe, brainstorming lists of directions/procedures for making something Technology: Interactive Technology sorting and sequencing activities Resources: Pancakes, Pancakes by Eric Carle; Ox Cart Man; Little Red Hen Cross Curriculum: Language Arts (how to books, sequencing), science (made of parts), 21st Century Skills: Accountability, Personal Responsibility, Ethics, Economic Literacy

GOVERNMENT Identify elected leaders and authority figures in the home, school and community and explain reasons for having persons in authority. Recognize and explain the importance of symbols and landmarks of the United States.

18. Identify authority figures in the home, school and community.

GVT A K.1

Lesson Ideas:  Election Day, class discussions, morning meeting, read alouds, guest speakers from community Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks, Tiger P.R.I.D.E. Cross Curriculum: language arts (informational texts) 21st Century Skills: Social Responsibility, Personal Responsibility

19. Recognize symbols of the United States that represent its democracy and values including: a. The national flag; b. The Pledge of Allegiance.

GVT B K.2

Lesson Ideas:  Morning announcements, daily activities, poetry folders, read alouds Technology: Kid Pix symbol stamps (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance), Interactive Technology symbol sort Resources: The Pledge of Allegiance (Scholastic), non-fiction leveled readers, http://bensguide.gpo.gov/ symbols web page Cross Curriculum: language arts (informational text) 21st Century Skills: Civic Literacy

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the purposes of rules in different settings and the results of adherence to, or violation of, the rules.

INDICATOR 20. Identify purposes for having rules and ways that they provide order, security and safety in the home, school and community.

GVT C K.3

Lesson Ideas:  Class discussion creating rules, review of safety procedures (fire drill, lock down, tornado drill), read alouds, morning meeting activities Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks, School Resource Officer, Guidance Counselor lessons, nonfiction leveled readers Cross Curriculum: Guidance Counselor lessons 21st Century Skills: Accountability, Ethics

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Describe the results of 21. Participate and CRR cooperation in group cooperate in classroom A settings and activities. K.1 demonstrate the necessary skills.

Lesson Ideas:  Special Helper, small group work (work stations, free choice), daily class activities, morning meeting Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks Cross Curriculum: all areas

Demonstrate personal accountability, including making choices and taking responsibility for personal actions.

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22. Take personal responsibility to follow directions and rules.

CRR B K.2

21st Century Skills: Leadership, Life Skills, People Skills, Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas:  Tiger P.R.I.D.E., Special Helper, read alouds, free choice/work stations, playground, lunch and recess behavior Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks, How To Lose all Your Friends, Guidance Counselor lessons Cross Curriculum: Guidance Counselor lessons, all areas

23. Demonstrate the ability to make choices and take responsibility for personal actions.

CRR B K.3

21st Century Skills: Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Leadership, Life Skills Lesson Ideas:  Free choice/center selections, Tiger P.R.I.D.E., playground, lunch and recess behavior Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com Resources: Responsive Classroom; How to Lose all Your Friends, Guidance Counselor lessons, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com, role play Cross Curriculum: Guidance Counselor lessons, all areas 21st Century Skills: Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Leadership, Social Responsibility

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Demonstrate personal accountability, including making choices and taking responsibility for personal actions. (cont.)

INDICATOR 24. Discuss the attributes and actions of a good citizen with emphasis on: a. Trust; b. Respect; c. Honesty; d. Responsibility; e. Fairness; f. Compassion; g. Self-control.

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain information 25. Listen for from oral, visual, print information. and electronic sources.

CRR B K.4

Lesson Ideas:  Classroom rules, Tiger P.R.I.D.E., read alouds, class discussion Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks; non-fiction read alouds, fiction read alouds, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com, role play Cross Curriculum: all areas 21st Century Skills: Civic Literacy, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Accountability

SM A K.1

Lesson Ideas:  Read alouds, whole group instruction, morning meeting, Writer’s Workshop author’s chair, class presentations, special guests Technology: video clips www.unitedstreaming.com Resources: non-fictions read alouds; Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks, role play Cross Curriculum: all areas 21st Century Skills: Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Communication and Information Skills

Predict outcomes based on factual information.

26. Sort objects or pictures according to appropriate criteria.

SM B K.2

Lesson Ideas:  Word sorts (sounds, letters, rhymes, syllables, blends), math sorts (shape, size, attributes), graphs Technology: Kidspiration (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance), Interactive Technology sorting activity Resources: Words Their Way, Fountas and Pinnell Phonics Cross Curriculum: Language Arts (words, letters, sounds), Math (shape), Science (physical characteristics, sink/float) 21st Century Skills: Personal Productivity, Creative Thinking and Problem Solving

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES KINDERGARTEN INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Predict outcomes 27. Compare similarities based on factual and differences among information. (cont.) objects or pictures.

SM B K.3

Lesson Ideas:  Observations, read alouds, Venn diagrams, animal habitat unit (mothers and babies alike/different); apple tree throughout the year, what things are made of Technology: Kidspiration (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: AIMS Animal Habitats unit materials Cross Curriculum: Language Arts (words, letters, sounds), Math (shape), Science (physical characteristics, sink/float)

Communicate information orally, visually or in writing

28. Communicate information.

SM C K.4

21st Century Skills: Personal Productivity, Creative Thinking and Problem Solving Lesson Ideas:  Special Helper, student of the week, author’s chair sharing, morning message, show and tell presentations, writer’s workshop writing Technology: word processing, Kid Pix/Kidspiration (create a simple paint graphic) (print with teacher assistance) Resources: writing folders, Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks Cross Curriculum: all areas

Identify a problem and work in groups to solve it.

29. Work with others by sharing, taking turns and raising hand to speak.

SM D K.5

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas:  Morning meeting, free choice centers, work stations, games, daily interactions with peers and teachers Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com Resources: Responsive Classroom First Six Weeks, role play, Tiger P.R.I.D.E, Guidance counselor lessons Cross Curriculum: all areas 21st Century Skills: Collaboration, People Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

15

GRADE 1

16

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Use a calendar to determine the day, week, month and year.

INDICATOR 1. Recite the months of the year.

H A 1.1

Lesson Ideas:  Daily morning meeting calendar activities, student jobs (calendar helper) Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference calendar websites http://www.apples4theteacher.com/calendar.html (log in, use graphic organizers and templates) Resources: Responsive Classroom (First 6 Weeks of School) www.responsiveclassroom.com Cross Curriculum: Math – number skills and number sense, Science –Changing Seasons

Place events in correct order on a time line.

2. Place events from one’s own life in chronological order.

H B 1.2

21st Century Skills: Calendar Helper (Personal Responsibility), calendar website (ICT - Communication and Information Skills) Lesson Ideas:  Timeline of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, Special Person of the Week – create timeline of own life. Technology: Kidpix to create timeline with text and graphics (Create a document including text and graphics, print information) research on internet using Interactive Technology or computer, Biography video clips Resources: Non-fiction biography literature, Encyclopedia, Internet (http://www.biography-center.com/), student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com

"

3. Distinguish among past, present and future.

H B 1.3

Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – research and reporting, sequencing events 21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction) Lesson Ideas:  Field Trip to Burton Century Village, pre and post trip explorations of maps, artifacts and pictures of Burton Century Village.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews. Technology: Interactive Technology Now and Then Toy Sort, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs) Resources: Village maps, Village tour, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet maps Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual 3

21st Century Skills: Field Trip, Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

17

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Compare daily life in the past and present demonstrating an understanding that while basic human needs remain the same, they are met in different ways in different times and places.

INDICATOR 4. Raise questions about how families lived in the past and use photographs, letters, artifacts and books to clarify what is known and what is unknown.

H C 1.4

Lesson Ideas:  Field Trip to Burton Century Village, pre and post trip explorations of maps, artifacts and pictures of Burton Century Village.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews. Technology: Interactive Technology Now and Then Toy Sort, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs) Resources: Village maps, Village tour, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet maps Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual

"

5. Compare past and present, near and far, with emphasis on daily life including: a. The roles of men, women and children; b. The identification of basic human needs; c. Various ways people meet human needs.

H C 1.5

21st Century Skills: Field Trip, Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology Lesson Ideas:  Around the World Unit (Customs and Cultures) – compare and contrast Chagrin Falls with one society from each continent.  Field Trip to Burton Century Village, pre and post trip explorations of maps, artifacts and pictures of Burton Century Village.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews.  Guest Speakers Technology: Interactive Technology Now and Then Toy Sort, Interactive Technology Culture Matching, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs) Resources: Custom and Culture information packet, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet world maps, poems, songs Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual 21st Century Skills: Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

18

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Recognize that the actions of individuals make a difference, and relate the stories of people from diverse backgrounds who have contributed to the heritage of the United States.

INDICATOR 6. Relate stories of the heroism and the achievements of the people associated with state and federal holidays.

H D 1.6

Lesson Ideas:  Veteran’s Day Read aloud and discussion, MLK Day Read aloud and discussion, President’s Day, Election Day, US Symbol Unit Technology: Kidpix to research US Symbols, Interactive Technology symbol sort, or computer, Biography video clips Resources: Non-fiction literature, Encyclopedia, KidPix US Symbols, US Symbols Book, student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com. The First Six Weeks of School Cross Curriculum: Science – scientists share findings with others, work impacts daily life. Language Arts – Reading Applications: Informational, Technical and Persuasive text 21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction, Ethics. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy)

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Identify practices and 7. Describe similarities products of diverse and differences in the cultures. ways different cultures meet common human needs including: a. Food; b. Clothing; c. Shelter; d. Language; e. Artistic expressions.

PS A 1.1

Lesson Ideas:  Around the World Unit (Customs and Cultures) – compare and contrast Chagrin Falls (Blossom) with one society from each continent.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews.  Guest Speakers present at Around the World Day Technology: Interactive Technology Culture Matching, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs), Wireless Lab World Encyclopedia Resources: Custom and Culture information packet, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet world maps, poems, songs, Venn Diagram Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual, Music Class – World Music 21st Century Skills: Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

19

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify ways that different cultures within the United States and the world have shaped our national heritage.

INDICATOR 8. Identify cultural practices of a culture on each continent through the study of the folktales, music and art created by people living in that culture.

PS B 1.2

Lesson Ideas:  Around the World Unit (Customs and Cultures) – compare and contrast Chagrin Falls (Blossom) with one society from each continent.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews.  Guest Speakers present at Around the World Day Technology: Interactive Technology Culture Matching, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs), Wireless Lab World Encyclopedia Resources: Custom and Culture information packet, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet world maps, poems, songs, Venn Diagram Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual, Music Class – World Music

"

9. Describe family and local community customs and traditions.

PS B 1.3

21st Century Skills: Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology Lesson Ideas:  Around the World Unit (Customs and Cultures) – compare and contrast Chagrin Falls (Blossom) with one society from each continent.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews.  Guest Speakers present at Around the World Day Technology: Interactive Technology Culture Matching, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs), Wireless Lab World Encyclopedia Resources: Custom and Culture information packet, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet world maps, poems, songs, Venn Diagram Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual, Music Class – World Music 21st Century Skills: Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

20

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify ways that different cultures within the United States and the world have shaped our national heritage. (cont.)

INDICATOR 10. Describe life in other countries with emphasis on daily life, including roles of men, women and children.

PS B 1.4

Lesson Ideas:  Around the World Unit (Customs and Cultures) – compare and contrast Chagrin Falls (Blossom) with one society from each continent.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts from other countries and Family Interviews.  Guest Speakers present at Around the World Day Technology: Interactive Technology Culture Matching, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs), Wireless Lab World Encyclopedia Resources: Custom and Culture information packet, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet world maps, poems, songs, Venn Diagram Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual, Music Class – World Music 21st Century Skills: Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology

GEOGRAPHY Identify the location of the state of Ohio, the United States, the continents and oceans on maps, globes and other geographic representations.

"

11. Identify and correctly use terms related to location, direction and distance including: a. Left/Right; b. Near/Far.

GEO A 1.1

12. Construct simple maps and models using symbols to represent familiar places (e.g., classroom, school or neighborhood).

GEO A 1.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  Gingerbread Man Hunt – through the school focusing on left/right/near/far  Morning Meeting – Over Under Activity Technology: Interactive Technology for Locating Activity, Resources: Gingerbread Man Hunt – Following directions around the school to find the Gingerbread Man, Books, Discussions Cross Curriculum: Language Arts Curriculum Connection, Math Connections 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – personal productivity. 21st Century Content – Global Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Maps and Landforms – CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps, Read Alouds, Junior Achievement, Maps of Gurney, Orienting ourselves in the world Technology: Make/read maps online, CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Interactive Technology map making Resources: CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps, Map playground and rooms around the school, Galaxy Book, Read alouds Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, Math – Measurement Units 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – people skills, personal responsibility, social responsibility, leadership. 21 st Century Content – Global Awareness)

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

21

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the location of the state of Ohio, the United States, the continents and oceans on maps, globes and other geographic representations. (cont.)

"

INDICATOR 13. Identify and use symbols to locate places of significance on maps and globes.

REF.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

GEO A 1.3

Lesson Ideas:  Maps and Landforms – CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps, Read Alouds, Junior Achievement, Maps of Gurney, Orienting ourselves in the world Technology: Make/read maps online, CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Interactive Technology map making Resources: CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps, Map playground and rooms around the school, Galaxy Book, Read alouds Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, Math – Measurement Units

14. Locate the local community, state and the United States on maps or globes.

GEO A 1.4

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – people skills, personal responsibility, social responsibility, leadership. 21 st Century Content – Global Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Maps and Landforms – CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps, Read Alouds, Junior Achievement, Maps of Gurney, Orienting ourselves in the world Technology: Make/read maps online, CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Interactive Technology map making Resources: CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps, Map playground and rooms around the school, Galaxy Book, Read alouds Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, Math – Measurement Units

Identify physical and human features of places.

15. Identify and describe the physical features (lake, river, hill, mountain, forest) and human features (town, city, farm, park, playground, house, traffic signs/signals) of places in the community.

GEO B 1.5

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – people skills, personal responsibility, social responsibility, leadership. 21 st Century Content – Global Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Maps and Landforms – CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps – ID Lake, river, hill, mountain, forest, Read Alouds, Junior Achievement, Maps of Gurney, Orienting ourselves in the world Technology: Make/read maps online, CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Interactive Technology map making Resources: CD-ROM Exploring Where and Why, Candy Maps, Map playground and rooms around the school, Galaxy Book, Read alouds Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, Math – Measurement Units 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – people skills, personal responsibility, social responsibility, leadership. 21st Century Content – Global Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

22

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Identify physical and 16. Compare areas within human features of the local community to places. (cont.) identify similarities.

GEO B 1.6

Lesson Ideas:  Around the World Unit (Customs and Cultures) – compare and contrast Chagrin Falls (Blossom) with one society from each continent.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews.  Guest Speakers present at Around the World Day. Technology: Interactive Technology Culture Matching, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs), Wireless Lab World Encyclopedia Resources: Custom and Culture information packet, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet world maps, poems, songs, Venn Diagram Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual, Music Class – World Music 21st Century Skills: Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology

Explain how environmental processes influence human activity and ways humans depend on and adapt to the environment.

17. Describe human adaptations to variations in the physical environment including: a. Food; b. Clothing; c. Shelter; d. Transportation; e. Recreation.

GEO C 1.7

Lesson Ideas:  Around the World Unit (Customs and Cultures) – compare and contrast Chagrin Falls (Blossom) with one society from each continent.  Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts.  Family Interviews.  Guest Speakers present at Around the World Day Technology: Interactive Technology Culture Matching, map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs), Wireless Lab World Encyclopedia Resources: Custom and Culture information packet, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet world maps, poems, songs, Venn Diagram Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual, Music Class – World Music 21st Century Skills: Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility). Critical Thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

23

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK ECONOMICS Explain how the scarcity of resources requires people to make choices to satisfy their wants.

Distinguish between goods and services and explain how people can be both buyers and sellers of goods and services. Explain ways that people may obtain goods and services.

INDICATOR

18. Explain that wants are unlimited and resources are scarce, thereby forcing individuals to make choices.

19. Explain that wants are unlimited and resources are scarce, thereby forcing individuals to make choices.

E A 1.1

Lesson Ideas:  Earth Day activities, Video: Taking Care of our Earth, Read and discuss the Lorax, Poems, Junior Achievement Lessons about needs and wants Technology: Topic Related video on www.unitedstreaming.com Resources: Plant Trees, Taking Care of our Earth, The Lorax, Poems, Lunch Checklist

E B 1.2

Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, The Wump Word 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills Lesson Ideas:  Earth Day, Video: Taking Care of our Earth, Read the Lorax, Poems, Technology: Topic Related video on www.unitedstreaming.com Resources: Plant Trees, Taking Care of our Earth, The Lorax, Poems, Lunch Checklist Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, The Wump Word

20. Explain ways that people may obtain goods and services that they do not produce including the use of money and barter.

E C 1.3

21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills Lesson Ideas:  Junior Achievement - Needs and Wants, Money, Mapping, Families, Work/Jobs – Comparing Cultures Technology: Interactive Technology Sort and activity Resources: Community Professional, Posters, Read Alouds, Role Play, JA materials Cross Curriculum: Math – Money 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills, Critical Thinking, Time Management Skills

GOVERNMENT Identify elected leaders and authority figures in the home, school and community and explain reasons for having persons in authority.

21. Recognize the role of authority figures in providing for the safety and security of individuals.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

GVT A 1.1

Lesson Ideas:  Junior Achievement - Needs and Wants, Money, Mapping, Families, Work/Jobs – Comparing Cultures Technology: Interactive Technology Sort and activity Resources: Community Professional, Posters, Read Alouds, Role Play, JA materials Cross Curriculum: Math – Money 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills, Critical Thinking, Time Management Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

24

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Identify elected 22. Explain how voting can leaders and authority be used to make group figures in the home, decisions. school and community and explain reasons for having persons in authority. (cont.)

Recognize and explain the importance of symbols and landmarks of the United States.

Explain the purposes of rules in different settings and the results of adherence to, or violation of, the rules.

23. Recognize symbols of the United States that represent its democracy and values including: a. The bald eagle; b. The White House; c. The Statue of Liberty; d. The national anthem.

24. Recognize the need for rules in different settings and the need for fairness in such rules.

GVT A 1.2

Lesson Ideas:  Election Day – Class Vote on all topics and interpret results Technology: Interactive Technology symbol sort, or computer Resources: Non-fiction literature, Encyclopedia, student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com. The First Six Weeks of School Cross Curriculum: Science – scientists share findings with others, work impacts daily life. Language Arts – Reading Applications: Informational, Technical and Persuasive text

GVT B 1.3

21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction, Ethics. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy) Lesson Ideas:  US Symbol Unit – Read alouds and discuss non-fiction texts Technology: Kidpix to research US Symbols, Interactive Technology symbol sort, or computer, Biography video clips Resources: Non-fiction literature, Encyclopedia, KidPix US Symbols, US Symbols Book, student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com Cross Curriculum: Science – scientists share findings with others, work impacts daily life. Language Arts – Reading Applications: Informational, Technical and Persuasive text

GVT C 1.4

21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction, Ethics. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy) Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Fiction and Non-fiction picture books.  Discussions on problem solving, Role Play Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com, use Interactive Technology for icons and role play Resources: Interactive Technology software, Books, Discussions, Role Play 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

25

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Explain the purposes 25. Discuss the of rules in different consequences of violating settings and the rules. results of adherence to, or violation of, the rules. (cont.)

GVT C 1.5

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Fiction and Non-fiction picture books.  Discussions on problem solving, Role Play Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com, use Interactive Technology for icons and role play Resources: Interactive Technology software, Books, Discussions, Role Play 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESONSIBILITIES Describe the results 26. Demonstrate the CRR of cooperation in importance of fair play, A group settings and good sportsmanship, 1.1 demonstrate the respect for the rights and necessary skills. opinions of others and the idea of treating others the way you want to be treated.

Demonstrate personal accountability, including making choices and taking responsibility for personal actions.

27. Demonstrate selfdirection in school tasks.

CRR B 1.2

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Fiction and Non-fiction picture books. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com, use Interactive Technology for icons and role play Resources: Interactive Technology software, Books, Discussions, Role Play 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Computer Lab Research – Around the World, Wireless Lab Research – Encyclopedia Technology: Interactive Technology Sort and activity Resources: Nocturnal Day Research with KidPix, Around the World Cultural Research with the wireless lab, Computer Lab research for US Symbols Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – writing and research, Math, Social Studies and Science 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills, Critical Thinking, Time Management Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

26

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Demonstrate 28. Demonstrate personal accountability for actions. accountability, including making choices and taking responsibility for personal actions. (cont.)

"

29. Demonstrate pride in personal accomplishments.

CRR B 1.3

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Fiction and Non-fiction picture books.  Discussions on problem solving, Role Play Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com, use Interactive Technology for icons and role play Resources: Interactive Technology software, Books, Discussions, Role Play

CRR B 1.4

21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Fiction and Non-fiction picture books.  Discussions on problem solving, Role Play Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com, use Interactive Technology for icons and role play Resources: Interactive Technology software, Books, Discussions, Role Play

"

30. Demonstrate citizenship traits including: a. Trustworthiness; b. Fairness; c. Self-control; d. Respect for those in authority.

CRR B 1.5

21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Fiction and Non-fiction picture books.  Discussions on problem solving, Role Play Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com, use Interactive Technology for icons and role play Resources: Interactive Technology software, Books, Discussions, Role Play 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

27

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Obtain information 31. Obtain information from oral, visual, about a topic using a print and electronic variety of oral and visual sources. sources.

SM A 1.1

Lesson Ideas:  Computer Lab Research – Around the World, Wireless Lab Research – Encyclopedia Technology: Interactive Technology Sort and activity Resources: Nocturnal Day Research with KidPix, Around the World Cultural Research with the wireless lab, Computer Lab research for US Symbols Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – writing and research, Math, Social Studies and Science

Predict outcomes based on factual information.

32. Sequence information.

SM B 1.2

21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills, Critical Thinking, Time Management Skills Lesson Ideas:  Timeline of Social Political Leaders, Special Person of the Week – create timeline of own life, Rosie’s Walk – Story Sequencing Technology: Kidpix to create timeline with text and graphics (Create a document including text and graphics, print information) research on internet using Interactive Technology or computer, Biography video clips Resources: Non-fiction biography literature, Encyclopedia, Internet (http://www.biography-center.com/), student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com, Rosie’s Walk Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – research and reporting, sequencing events

"

33. Determine categories for sorting information.

SM B 1.3

21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction) Lesson Ideas:  Computer Lab Research – Around the World, Wireless Lab Research – Encyclopedia Technology: Interactive Technology Sort and activity Resources: Nocturnal Day Research with KidPix, Around the World Cultural Research with the wireless lab, Computer Lab research for US Symbols Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – writing and research, Math, Social Studies and Science 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills, Critical Thinking, Time Management Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

28

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 1 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Predict outcomes 34. Identify main ideas based on factual from oral, visual and print information. (cont.) sources.

SM B 1.4

Lesson Ideas:  Computer Lab Research – Around the World, Wireless Lab Research – Encyclopedia Technology: Interactive Technology Sort and activity Resources: Nocturnal Day Research with KidPix, Around the World Cultural Research with the wireless lab, Computer Lab research for US Symbols Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – writing and research, Math, Social Studies and Science

Communicate information orally, visually or in writing.

35. Communicate information orally or visually.

SM C 1.5

21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills, Critical Thinking, Time Management Skills Lesson Ideas:  Computer Lab Research – Around the World, Wireless Lab Research – Encyclopedia Technology: Interactive Technology Sort and activity Resources: Nocturnal Day Research with KidPix, Around the World Cultural Research with the wireless lab, Computer Lab research for US Symbols Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – writing and research, Math, Social Studies and Science

Identify a problem and work in groups to solve it.

36. Display courtesy and respect for others in group settings including: a. Staying on the topic; b. Focusing attention on the speaker.

SM D 1.6

21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration, Self-motivation/Initiative, Leadership Skills, Critical Thinking, Time Management Skills Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Fiction and Non-fiction picture books.  Discussions on problem solving, Role Play Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com , use Interactive Technology for icons and role play Resources: Interactive Technology software, Books, Discussions, Role Play Cross Curriculum: n/a 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

29

GRADE 2

30

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR HISTORY Use a calendar to 1. Measure calendar time determine the day, by days, weeks, months week, month and and years. year.

H A 2.1

Lesson Ideas:  Daily morning meeting activities, student jobs (calendar helper – announces the day, date, and year every morning), mapping the phases of the moon on a calendar noticing the number of days in a month Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference calendar websites http://www.apples4theteacher.com/calendar.html (log in, use graphic organizers and templates) Resources: Responsive Classroom (First 6 Weeks of School) www.responsiveclassroom.com, http://www.calculatorcat.com/moon_phases/moon_phases.phtml

"

2. List the days of the week and months of the year in order.

H A 2.2

Cross Curriculum: Math – number skills and number sense, Science – phases of moon based on 30 day cycle 21st Century Skills: Calendar Helper (Personal Responsibility), calendar website (ICT - Communication and Information Skills) Lesson Ideas:  Daily morning meeting activities (“Today is…” “Tomorrow is…” “Yesterday was…” student jobs (calendar helper – announcing the day, date and year every morning) Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference calendar websites http://www.apples4theteacher.com/calendar.html (log in, use graphic organizers and templates) Resources: Responsive Classroom (First 6 Weeks of School) www.responsiveclassroom.com, http://www.calculatorcat.com/moon_phases/moon_phases.phtml

Place events in correct order on a time line.

3. Place a series of related events in chronological order on a time line.

H B 2.3

Cross Curriculum: Math – number skills and number sense, Science – phases of moon based on 30 day cycle 21st Century Skills: Calendar Helper (Personal Responsibility), calendar website (ICT Communication and Information Skills) Lesson Ideas:  Biographies Unit – study/record life timeline (during African American History Month, famous Americans, etc.). Student choice reports/project (diorama, etc.) on Social Political Leaders, Special Person of the Week – create timeline of own life. Technology: Kidpix to create timeline with text and graphics (Create a document including text and graphics, print information) research on internet using Interactive Technology or computer, Biography video clips, publish a written piece in Microsoft Word (using spell check) Resources: Non-fiction biography literature, Encyclopedia, Internet (http://www.biography-center.com/), student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – research and reporting, sequencing events 21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

31

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Compare daily life in the past and present demonstrating an understanding that while basic human needs remain the same, they are met in different ways in different times and places.

INDICATOR 4. Use historical artifacts, photographs, biographies, maps, diaries and folklore to answer questions about daily life in the past.

H C 2.4

"

5. Identify the work that people performed to make a living in the past and explain how jobs in the past are similar and/or different from those of today.

H C 2.5

"

6. Identify and describe examples of how science and technology have changed the daily lives of people and compare: a. Forms of communication from the past and present; b. Forms of transportation from the past and present.

H C 2.6

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  Biography Unit/Projects. Hale Farm and Village field trip, pre- and post- trip explorations of maps, artifacts, pictures of Hale Farm, Community resource person to share experiences/artifacts. Family Interviews. Technology: map websites, video clips on internet, class mapping activity using Interactive Technology, research on historical artifacts on website (log in, start and exit programs) Resources: Farm maps, farm tour, community/family member, non-fiction books, internet maps (http://www.maps.com/FunFacts.aspx?nav=FF) Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communications Oral and Visual 21st Century Skills: Field Trip, Interview (Thinking and Learning Skills – Communication and Information, Life Skills – People Skills, Social Responsibility) Lesson Ideas:  Guest Speakers with a variety of careers – students prepare for interview with questions, Venn Diagram to compare or contrast, research using picture books/internet, “intern” with school employees (cafeteria, office, grounds, or janitorial staff). Technology: Interactive Technology for interactive Venn Diagram, use Microsoft Word to create interview sheet (print information, change font and size, perform spell check) Resources: community volunteers, graphic organizers, Non-fiction picture books, internet, Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – demonstrate comprehension using graphic organizers, Acquiring information from multiple sources (interview, surveys, etc.) 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability, 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy) Lesson Ideas:  Guest Speakers – students prepare for interview with questions, Venn Diagram to compare on contrast, research using picture books/internet to research. Group project – students create choice project to show changes in transportation/communication over time. Technology: Interactive Technology for interactive Venn Diagram, use Microsoft Word to create interview sheet (print information, change font and size, perform spell check) Resources: community volunteers, graphic organizers, Non-fiction picture books, internet, Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – demonstrate comprehension using graphic organizers, Acquiring information from multiple sources (interview, surveys, etc.) 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skill. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability, 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy)

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

32

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Recognize that the actions of individuals make a difference, and relate the stories of people from diverse backgrounds who have contributed to the heritage of the United States.

INDICATOR 7. Recognize the importance of individual action and character and explain how they have made a difference in others’ lives with emphasis on the importance of: a. Social and political leaders in the United States (e.g., George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Tecumseh, Harriet Tubman, Abraham Lincoln, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony and Martin Luther King Jr.); b. Explorers, inventors and scientists (e.g., George Washington Carver, Thomas Edison, Charles Drew, Rachel Carson and Neil Armstrong).

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Identify practices and 8. Describe the cultural products of diverse practices and products of cultures. people on different continents.

H D 2.7

Lesson Ideas:  Biographies Unit – study/record life timeline. Student choice reports/project (diorama, etc.) on Social Political Leaders. Special Person of the Week – create timeline of own life. Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, rules and logical consequences Technology: Kidpix to create timeline with text and graphics (Create a document including text and graphics, print information) research on internet using Interactive Technology or computer, Biography video clips, publish a written piece in Microsoft Word (using spell check) Resources: Non-fiction biography literature, Encyclopedia, Internet (http://www.biography-center.com/), student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com The First Six Weeks of School Cross Curriculum: Science – scientists share findings with others, work impacts daily life. Language Arts – Reading Applications: Informational, Technical and Persuasive text 21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, SelfDirection, Ethics. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy)

PS A 2.1

Lesson Ideas:  Heritage Unit – family/ancestor interview. World's Fair – research, choice and group projects, presentation at World’s Fair. Brochures, research webs. Interactive Interactive Technology activities (unitedstreaming.com). This Is The Way We Go To School with a compare/contrast organizer. Technology: Interactive Technology for interactive Venn Diagram, use Microsoft Word to create interview sheet (print information, change font and size, perform spell check) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction country books, graphic organizers, internet (http://www.mrnussbaum.com/continentscode2.htm) Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications – Research, Foreign Language Curriculum Connection 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skill. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability, 21st Century Content – Global Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

33

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify ways that different cultures within the United States and the world have shaped our national heritage.

INDICATOR 9. Describe ways in which language, stories, folktales, music and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture and influence the behavior of people living in a particular culture.

PS B 2.2

Lesson Ideas:  Heritage Unit – family/ancestor interview. World's Fair – research, choice and group projects, presentation at World’s Fair. Brochures, research webs. Interactive Interactive Technology activities (unitedstreaming.com). This Is The Way We Go To School with a compare/contrast organizer. Technology: Interactive Technology for interactive Venn Diagram, use Microsoft Word to create interview sheet (print information, change font and size, perform spell check) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction country books, graphic organizers, internet (http://www.mrnussbaum.com/continentscode2.htm) Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications – Research, Foreign Language Curriculum Connection

"

10. Explain how contributions of different cultures within the United States have influenced our common national heritage.

PS B 2.3

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skill. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability, 21st Century Content – Global Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Heritage Unit – family/ancestor interview. World's Fair – research, choice and group projects, presentation at World’s Fair. Brochures, research webs. Interactive Interactive Technology activities (unitedstreaming.com). This Is The Way We Go To School with a compare/contrast organizer. Technology: Interactive Technology for interactive Venn Diagram, use Microsoft Word to create interview sheet (print information, change font and size, perform spell check) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction country books, graphic organizers, internet (http://www.mrnussbaum.com/continentscode2.htm) Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications – Research, Foreign Language Curriculum Connection 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skill. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability, 21st Century Content – Global Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

34

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify ways that different cultures within the United States and the world have shaped our national heritage. (cont.)

INDICATOR 11. Describe the contributions of significant individuals, including artisans, inventors, scientists, architects, explorers and political leaders to the cultural heritage of the United States.

PS B 2.4

Lesson Ideas:  Heritage Unit – family/ancestor interview. World's Fair – research, choice and group projects, presentation at World’s Fair. Brochures, research webs. Interactive Interactive Technology activities (unitedstreaming.com). This Is The Way We Go To School with a compare/contrast organizer. Technology: Interactive Technology for interactive Venn Diagram, use Microsoft Word to create interview sheet (print information, change font and size, perform spell check), import pictures of family/ancestors into choice project (place digital images into a document) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction country books, graphic organizers, internet (http://www.mrnussbaum.com/continentscode2.htm) Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications – Research, Foreign Language Curriculum Connection 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability, 21st Century Content – Global Awareness)

GEOGRAPHY Identify the location of the state of Ohio, the United States, the continents and oceans on maps, globes and other geographic representations.

12. Read and interpret a variety of maps.

GEO A 2.1

Lesson Ideas:  Read aloud Mapping Penny’s World and students map classroom/bedroom, compass rose/map key activities. Large group project sorting continents using globe or map as reference. Interactive Technology software– interactive continent click and drag game, “Where In The World” globe/map game, students complete map, using Kidspiration or create map, using Kidpix. Technology: create, name and save files, start and exit programs, save files to home folder on network Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction picture books, Mrs. Butler’s Websites – Geography, Interactive Technology software, large laminated continent puzzle pieces/map Cross Curriculum: Foreign Language Curriculum Connection 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – Personal Productivity. 21st Century Content – Global Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

35

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the location of the state of Ohio, the United States, the continents and oceans on maps, globes and other geographic representations. (cont.)

INDICATOR 13. Construct a map that includes a map title and key that explains all symbols that are used.

GEO A 2.2

Lesson Ideas:  Read aloud Mapping Penny’s World and students map classroom/bedroom, compass rose/map key activities. Large group project sorting continents using globe or map as reference. Interactive Technology software– interactive continent click and drag game, “Where In The World” globe/map game, students complete map, using Kidspiration or create map, using Kidpix. Technology: create, name and save files, start and exit programs, save files to home folder on network Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction picture books, Mrs. Butler’s Websites – Geography, Interactive Technology software, large laminated continent puzzle pieces/map Cross Curriculum: Foreign Language Curriculum Connection

"

14. Name and locate the continents and oceans.

GEO A 2.3

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – Personal Productivity. 21st Century Content – Global Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Read aloud Mapping Penny’s World and students map classroom/bedroom, compass rose/map key activities. Large group project sorting continents using globe or map as reference. Interactive Technology software– interactive continent click and drag game, “Where In The World” globe/map game, students complete map, using Kidspiration or create map, using Kidpix Technology: create, name and save files, start and exit programs, save files to home folder on network Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction picture books, Mrs. Butler’s Websites – Geography, Interactive Technology software, large laminated continent puzzle pieces/map Cross Curriculum: Foreign Language Curriculum Connection

Identify physical and human features of places.

15. Describe and locate landforms (plateaus, islands, hills, mountains, valleys) and bodies of water (creeks, ponds, lakes, oceans) in photographs, maps and 3-D models.

GEO B 2.4

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – Personal Productivity. 21st Century Content – Global Awareness) Lesson Ideas:  Students work collaboratively to use pizza box tops and salt dough or Crayola Clay to make salt dough maps showing topography. Non-Fiction picture books. Students make the dough to practice measurement. Students create their own topographic map online or in Kidpix. Students can create dioramas of topography. Technology: students research salt dough recipes, and make topographic maps online http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/srtm_makemap.shtml (use paint tools to create graphics, change printer from black and white to color) Resources: Salt dough recipes http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,salt_dough_maps,FF.html Non-fiction picture books (check school bookroom) Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, Math – Measurement Units 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – People Skills, Personal and Social Responsibility, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Global Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

36

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Explain how 16. Compare how land is environmental used in urban, suburban processes influence and rural environments. human activity and ways humans depend on and adapt to the environment.

Explain how environmental processes influence human activity and ways humans depend on and adapt to the environment. (cont.)

17. Identify ways in which people have responded to and modified the physical environment such as building roads and clearing land for urban development.

GEO C 2.5

Lesson Ideas:  Class breaks into groups, each group studies and presents an environment (urban, suburban, and rural) in a form of their choice. Then studies are reported, students use graphic organizer to compare and contrast. Each group views a video clip (or reads a picture book) about life in their environment. Discusses differences, changes with class, or students work in groups to complete web quest to help a family choose where to live. http://coe.west.asu.edu/students/lmyers/wq/

Technology: Interactive Technology, map quest project, internet research (log in, start and exit programs)

GEO C 2.6

Resources: Non-fiction picture books, http://coe.west.asu.edu/students/lmyers/wq/ Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communication and Oral: Speaking Skills and Strategies 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – Leadership, Adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship) Lesson Ideas:  Class breaks into groups, each group studies and presents an environment (urban, suburban, and rural) in a form of their choice. Then studies are reported, students use graphic organizer to compare and contrast. Each group views a video clip (or reads a picture book) about life in their environment. Discusses differences, changes with class, or students work in groups to complete web quest to help a family choose where to live http://coe.west.asu.edu/students/lmyers/wq/ Technology: Interactive Technology, map quest project, internet research (log in, start and exit programs) Resources: Non-fiction picture books, http://coe.west.asu.edu/students/lmyers/wq/ Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Communication and Oral: Speaking Skills and Strategies 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – Leadership, Adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship)

ECONOMICS Explain how the scarcity of resources requires people to make choices to satisfy their wants.

18. Explain how resources can be used in various ways (e.g., a bushel of corn could be fed to cows, used to make sweetener, or converted to fuel).

E A 2.1

Lesson Ideas  Role-play with entire class. Have minimal resources (cup of corn, 2 sheets of paper, 2 pieces of wood, dirt, water, seed, etc.) Students then come up with creative ways to solve the problem of limited resources. Discuss sharing resources with all. Technology: Research how resources are used, Interactive Technology list of each resources and its use (starting and exiting programs) Resources: explanation of scarcity and its impact on goods and services - http://williamking.www.drexel.edu/top/prin/txt/Neoch/Eco111l.html Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry, and Scientific Ways of Knowing, Language Arts - research 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – Ethics. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

37

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Distinguish between goods and services and explain how people can be both buyers and sellers of goods and services.

"

"

INDICATOR 19. Explain how people are both buyers and sellers of goods and services.

20. Recognize that most people work in jobs in which they produce a few special goods or services.

21. Explain why people in different parts of the world earn a living in a variety of ways.

E B 2.2

E B 2.3

E B 2.4

Lesson Ideas  Mini-Society. Grade level activity – each class votes on a country, currency, symbols, etc. Students create business plans for goods/services that they will sell to other “countries”. Students advertise and sell their products. Students vote on bankers to manage money. Community volunteers in to discuss products/services made and sold. Junior Achievement economics lesson. Students design money, country symbols, etc. in KidPix Technology: save files, create document using text and graphics, switching printer from black and white to color Resources: Community Members, Junior Achievement, Follow the Money picture book Cross Curriculum: Math – Count Money and Make Change 21st Century Skills: (ICT and Thinking and Learning Skills –Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Personal Responsibility, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Financial, Economic Businesses and Entrepreneurship) Lesson Ideas:  Mini-Society. Grade level activity – each class votes on a country, currency, symbols, etc. Students create business plans for goods/services that they will sell to other “countries”. Students advertise and sell their products. Students vote on bankers to manage money. Community volunteers in to discuss products/services made and sold. Junior Achievement economics lesson. Students design money, country symbols, etc. in KidPix Technology: save files, create document using text and graphics, switching printer from black and white to color Resources: Community Members, Junior Achievement, Follow the Money picture book Cross Curriculum: Math – Count Money and Make Change 21st Century Skills: (ICT and Thinking and Learning Skills –Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Personal Responsibility, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Financial, Economic Businesses and Entrepreneurship) Lesson Ideas:  Mini-Society. Grade level activity – each class votes on a country, currency, symbols, etc. Students create business plans for goods/services that they will sell to other “countries”. Students advertise and sell their products. Students vote on bankers to manage money. Community volunteers in to discuss products/services made and sold. Junior Achievement economics lesson. Students design money, country symbols, etc. in KidPix. Discussion using Venn Diagram of how living in different places affects employment. Technology: save files, create document using text and graphics, switching printer from black and white to color Resources: Community Members, Junior Achievement, Follow the Money picture book Cross Curriculum: Math – Count Money and Make Change 21st Century Skills: (ICT and Thinking and Learning Skills –Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Personal Responsibility, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Financial, Economic Businesses and Entrepreneurship)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

38

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Explain ways that 22. Recognize that people may obtain money is a generally goods and services. accepted medium of exchange for goods and services and that different countries use different forms of money.

E C 2.5

Lesson Ideas:  Mini-Society. Grade level activity – each class votes on a country, currency, symbols, etc. Students create business plans for goods/services that they will sell to other “countries”. Students advertise and sell their products. Students vote on bankers to manage money. Community volunteers in to discuss products/services made and sold. Junior Achievement economics lesson. Students design money, country symbols, etc. in KidPix Technology: save files, create document using text and graphics, switching printer from black and white to color Resources: Community Members, Junior Achievement, Follow the Money picture book Cross Curriculum: Math – Count Money and Make Change 21st Century Skills: (ICT and Thinking and Learning Skills –Creativity and Innovation, Collaboration. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Personal Responsibility, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Financial, Economic Businesses and Entrepreneurship)

GOVERNMENT Identify elected leaders and authority figures in the home, school and community and explain reasons for having persons in authority.

23. Identify leaders such as mayor, governor and president, and explain that they are elected by the people.

GOV A 2.1

Lesson Ideas:  Create a group “flow chart” that differentiates between Mayor, Governor, and President to introduce. Create class “city” where students learn to run for a position, vote on a leader. Then students take a poll of class wants/needs of Mayor, and then discuss what is feasible, and feasible (see Government Projects p. 28). Students can create “flowing government” using a coat hanger (p. 12). Real Mayor to come in after project completed. Technology: Students can create campaign posters, etc. in KidPix, can tally votes as they come using Interactive Technology (print information on your own; create a document using text and graphics, save files in a folder or on the network) Resources: Government Projects by Carole Marsh. Mrs. Butler’s website for local government: http://www.chagrin-falls.k12.oh.us/cfis/Common/Butlerweb/chagrinfallsvillage/Chagrinfallsvillage.html Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – deliver informal presentations 21st Century Skills: (ICT and Thinking and Learning Skills –Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Informational. Life Skills – Leadership, Accountability. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

39

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify elected leaders and authority figures in the home, school and community and explain reasons for having persons in authority. (cont.)

Recognize and explain the importance of symbols and landmarks of the United States.

INDICATOR 24. Explain how a system of government provides order to a group such as a school or community and why government is necessary including: a. Making and enforcing laws; b. Providing leadership; c. Providing services; d. Resolving disputes. 25. Explain the importance of landmarks in the United States and the ideals that they represent including: a. The Washington Monument; b. The Jefferson Memorial; c. The Lincoln Memorial.

GOV A 2.2

GOV B 2.3

Lesson Ideas:  Read Kingdom with No Rules, No Laws, Responsive Classroom – Rules and logical consequences (created by students to meet their Hopes and Dreams), relate to government, Junior Achievement Unit, guest speaker (fire dept., police officer, Mayor) Technology: Use Interactive Technology to create a power point or a sort differentiating between rules and laws, Interactive government game on Ben’s Guide to Government (start and exit a program) Resources: Kingdom with No Rules, No Laws, The First Six Weeks of School, Junior Achievement. Your guide to Government online: http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/index.html 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy) Lesson Ideas:  Introduce each symbol with a Non-fiction picture book, or website on the Interactive Technology (www.unitedstreaming.com), and then students create their own symbols book. Hands-on symbols sort using Interactive Technology software. Interactive symbols match game (http://www.primarygames.com/social_studies.htm) Students research one landmark online, complete web in Kidspiration, then draw picture of landmark in KidPix Technology: start and exit programs, save files in folder or on network, print information, use graphic organizers or templates Resources: Interactive Technology software, www.primarygames.com, Non-fiction picture books Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Reading Applications, Informational, Technical, and Persuasive text

Explain the purposes of rules in different settings and the results of adherence to, or violation of, the rules.

26. Explain the purpose of rules in the workplace.

GOV C 2.4

21st Century Skills: (ICT and Thinking and Learning Skills –Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Personal Productivity. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy) Lesson Ideas:  Read Kingdom with No Rules, No Laws, Responsive Classroom – Rules and logical consequences (created by students to meet their Hopes and Dreams), relate to government, Junior Achievement Unit, guest speaker (fire dept., police officer, Mayor) Technology: Use Interactive Technology to create a power point or a sort differentiating between rules and laws, Interactive government game on Ben’s Guide to Government (start and exit a program) Resources: Kingdom with No Rules, No Laws, The First Six Weeks of School, Junior Achievement. Your guide to Government online: http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/index.html 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

40

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the purposes of rules in different settings and the results of adherence to, or violation of, the rules. (cont.)

INDICATOR 27. Predict the consequences of following rules or violating rules in different settings.

GOV C 2.5

Lesson Ideas:  Read Kingdom with No Rules, No Laws, Responsive Classroom – Rules and logical consequences (created by students to meet their Hopes and Dreams), relate to government, Junior Achievement Unit, guest speaker (fire dept., police officer, Mayor) Technology: Use Interactive Technology to create a power point or a sort differentiating between rules and laws, Interactive government game on Ben’s Guide to Government (start and exit a program) Resources: Kingdom with No Rules, No Laws, The First Six Weeks of School, Junior Achievement. Your guide to Government online: http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/index.html 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy)

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Describe the results 28. Demonstrate skills CRR of cooperation in and explain the benefits A group settings and of cooperation when 2.1 demonstrate the working in group necessary skills. settings: a. Manage conflict peacefully; b. Display courtesy; c. Respect others.

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Follow the 5 lesson plans for the “Talk It Out Curriculum” Fiction and Non-fiction picture books. Student created booklets on problem solving. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com , use Interactive Technology for the Talk It Out question and answers (starting and exiting a program) Resources: First Six Weeks of School, Mrs. Piggly Wiggly books, Talk It Out, Conflict Resolution in the Elementary Classroom by Barbara Porro, Interactive Technology software, Mean Jean the Recess Queen, When Sophie Gets Angry...Really, Really Angry, Alexander’s No Good, Very Bad Day 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

41

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Demonstrate personal accountability, including making choices and taking responsibility for personal actions.

INDICATOR 29. Demonstrate selfdirection in tasks within the school community (e.g., classroom, cafeteria and playground).

CRR B 2.2

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Follow the 5 lesson plans for the “Talk It Out Curriculum” Fiction and Non-fiction picture books. Student created booklets on problem solving. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com , use Interactive Technology for the Talk It Out question and answers (starting and exiting a program) Resources: First Six Weeks of School, Mrs. Piggly Wiggly books, Talk It Out, Conflict Resolution in the Elementary Classroom by Barbara Porro, Interactive Technology software, Mean Jean the Recess Queen, When Sophie Gets Angry, Really, Really Angry, Alexander’s No Good, Very Bad Day 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

"

30. Demonstrate citizenship traits including: a. Honesty; b. Self-assurance; c. Respect for the rights of others; d. Persistence; e. Patriotism.

CRR B 2.3

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, Follow the 5 lesson plans for the “Talk It Out Curriculum” Fiction and Non-fiction picture books. Student created booklets on problem solving. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com , use Interactive Technology for the Talk It Out question and answers (starting and exiting a program) Resources: First Six Weeks of School, Mrs. Piggly Wiggly books, Talk It Out, Conflict Resolution in the Elementary Classroom by Barbara Porro, Interactive Technology software, Mean Jean the Recess Queen, When Sophie Gets Angry, Really, Really Angry, Alexander’s No Good, Very Bad Day 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21 st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

42

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain information 31. Obtain information from oral, visual, from oral, visual and print and electronic print sources. sources.

SM A 2.1

Lesson Ideas:  Previously mentioned Heritage unit, landmark computer project, biography choice projects, interviews Technology: Interactive Technology and internet for research, use Microsoft Word organize and record research information (print information, change font and size, perform spell check) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction country books, graphic organizers, internet (http://www.mrnussbaum.com/continentscode2.htm) Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications – Research

"

32. Identify sources used to gather information: a. People; b. Printed materials; c. Electronic sources.

SM A 2.2

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skill. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability) Lesson Ideas:  Previously mentioned Heritage unit, landmark computer project, biography choice projects, interviews Technology: Interactive Technology and internet for research, use Microsoft Word organize and record research information (print information, change font and size, perform spell check) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction country books, graphic organizers, internet (http://www.mrnussbaum.com/continentscode2.htm) Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications – Research

Predict outcomes based on factual information.

33. Predict the next event in a sequence.

SM B 2.3

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skill. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability) Lesson Ideas:  Biographies Unit – study/record life timeline, Student choice reports/project (diorama, etc.) on Social Political Leaders, Special Person of the Week – create timeline of own life. Technology: Kidpix to create timeline with text and graphics (Create a document including text and graphics, print information) research on internet using Interactive Technology or computer, Biography video clips, publish a written piece in Microsoft Word (using spell check) Resources: Non-fiction biography literature, Encyclopedia, Internet (http://www.biography-center.com/), student personal experience, video clips www.unitedstreaming.com Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – research and reporting, sequencing events 21st Century Skills: Choice report/project (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Creativity and Innovations Skills, Communication and Information Skills. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

43

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR " 34. Distinguish the difference between fact and fiction in oral, visual and print materials.

SM B 2.4

Lesson Ideas:  Interactive Technology sort with fact or fiction game (students determine if SS information is fact or fiction) Technology: Interactive Technology interactive game (starting and exiting programs) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction picture books, Interactive Technology software Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Reading Applications, Informational, Technical and Persuasive Text

Communicate information orally, visually or in writing.

35. Communicate information in writing.

SM C 2.5

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skill. Life Skills – People Skills, Accountability) Lesson Ideas:  Students create travel brochure for country of study. Related to the World’s Fair and Heritage projects. Students research country, organize writing on graphic organizer, determine important facts, publish brochure Technology: Interactive Technology and computers for research (log in, starting and exiting programs) Resources: encyclopedias, non-fiction picture books, internet, graphic organizer by topic (food, traditions, climate, other, etc.) Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications, Writing Conventions, Research

Identify a problem and work in groups to solve it.

36. Use problemsolving/decision-making skills to identify a problem and gather information while working independently and in groups.

SM D 2.6

21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills – Collaboration, Communication and Information Skills. Life Skills – Personal Productivity, Self-Direction) Lesson Ideas:  Logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Building wide Tiger PRIDE program, follow the 5 lesson plans for the “Talk It Out Curriculum” Fiction and Non-fiction picture books. Student created booklets on problem solving. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com , use Interactive Technology for the Talk It Out question and answers (starting and exiting a program) Resources: First Six Weeks of School, Mrs. Piggly Wiggly books, Talk It Out, Conflict Resolution in the Elementary Classroom by Barbara Porro, Interactive Technology software, Mean Jean the Recess Queen, When Sophie Gets Angry, Really, Really Angry, Alexander’s No Good, Very Bad Day 21st Century Skills: (Thinking and Learning Skills –Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills. Life Skills – Social Responsibility, Self-Direction, Personal Responsibility, Accountability, Adaptability, Ethics, Leadership. 21st Century Content – Civic Literacy, Health and Wellness Awareness)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

44

GRADE 3

45

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR HISTORY Construct time lines 1. Define and measure to demonstrate an time by years, decades understanding of and centuries. units of time and chronological order.

H A 3.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a time line of the local history of Chagrin Falls during the Chagrin Falls Local History Unit. Students will work in small groups to draw historically appropriate pictures as well as write a summary of events along the time line. * Teach lesson in conjunction with following indicator HA 3.2 Place local historical events in sequential order on a time line. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference events along time line. www.ohiohistorycentral.org Resources: Chagrin Falls: An Ohio Village History by the Chagrin Falls Historical Society – Editor Laura Gorretta; www.ohiohistorycentral.org/ohio_across_time.php Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense. Students will be able to place events in chronological order. Research and Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Collaboration and self-direction. ICT Communication and Information Skills

"

2. Place local historical events in sequential order on a time line.

H A 3.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a time line of the local history of Chagrin Falls during the Chagrin Falls Local History Unit. Students will work in small groups to draw historically appropriate pictures as well as write a summary of events along the time line. * Teach lesson in conjunction with following indicator HA 3.1 Define and measure time by years, decades and centuries. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference events along time line. www.ohiohistorycentral.org Resources: Chagrin Falls: An Ohio Village History by the Chagrin Falls Historical Society – Editor Laura Gorretta; www.ohiohistorycentral.org/ohio_across_time.php Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense. Students will be able to place events in chronological order. 21st Century Skills: Collaboration and Self-Direction. ICT Communication and Information Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

46

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Explain how new 3. Describe changes in developments led to the community over time the growth of the including changes in: United States. a. Businesses; b. Architecture; c. Physical features; d. Employment; e. Education; f. Transportation; g. Technology; h. Religion; i. Recreation. PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Compare practices 4. Compare some of the and products of North cultural practices and American cultural products of various groups. groups of people who have lived in the local community including: a. Artistic expression; b. Religion; c. Language; d. Food.

"

5. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States and countries of the world.

H C 3.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will determine changes over time by using both past and present photographs of our local community. These changes over time will reflect the corresponding aspects of our local community, business, architecture, physical features, employment, education, transportation, technology, religion and recreation. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference local historical photographs that display the changes in our local community. www.ohiomemory.org. Students will create on-line scrapbook of photographs. www.google.com/googleearth may be used to view current photographs of Chagrin Falls. Resources: Chagrin Falls: An Ohio Village History by the Chagrin Falls Historical Society – Editor Laura Gorretta; Photographs of community. Chagrin Falls historical slideshow. Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications - Research 21st Century Skills: Communication, Self Direction and Critical thinking

PS A 3.1

Lesson Ideas:  Family Holiday Tradition Lesson – Students will research various cultural and religious holiday traditions celebrated by their immediate families. Students will share and discuss their traditions as well as write a formal report explaining their tradition based on cultural practices. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students create graphic organizer in KidPix or like application. Students will also use Microsoft Word to present written communication. www.santaclaus.com and www.Christmasaroundtheworld.com Resources: Family Interview Sheet and Graphic Organizer. Internet and Interactive Technology Cross Curriculum: Language Arts - Writing – Research and paragraph writing.

PS A 3.2

21st Century Skills: Communication, Information skills, Global Awareness, Self Direction and Critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Students will communicate through writing and technology to survey one elementary school in each state on regional products and practices. (i.e.: foods, recreation, religion, etc.) Great Mail Race. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students create research topics and contact other peers in various elementary schools across the country. Resources: Completed surveys received in the mail from other schools. Computer and email and communication via internet. www.share1.esd105.wednet.edu/blackl/greatmailrace.htm Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Formal Letter Writing and Research 21st Century Skills: Communication, Information skills, Global Awareness, Self Direction, People Skills and Critical thinking.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

47

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the reasons people from various cultural groups came to North America and the consequences of their interactions with each other

INDICATOR 6. Describe settlement patterns of various cultural groups within the local community.

PS B 3.3

Lesson Ideas:  Self-paced, discovery learning lesson regarding the settlement of Chagrin Falls by the various cultural groups. Students will use computers and Interactive Technology to find the origins of the people who founded our local community. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference local historical photographs that display the changes in our local community. www.ohiomemory.org. Students will create on-line scrapbook of photographs. www.google.com/googleearth may be used to current photographs of Chagrin Falls. Resources: www.chagrinfalls.net and Chagrin Falls Historical Society Field Trip Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Civic Literacy, Self Direction

GEOGRAPHY Use map elements or coordinates to locate physical and human features of North America.

7. Use political maps, physical maps and aerial photographs to ask and answer questions about the local community.

GEO A 3.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will look at various aerial photographs of our local community beginning with a picture of the entire globe. Students will then drill down to locate North America, Ohio, Chagrin Falls and then finally arrive at the Popcorn Shop. Students will use Google Earth to task a satellite and zoom in to our local community from outer space by using geographical features of North America; i.e. Atlantic Ocean, Lake Erie and the Ohio River. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference local historical photographs that display the changes in our local community. www.ohiomemory.org. Students will create on-line scrapbook of photographs. www.google.com/googleearth may be used to current photographs of Chagrin Falls.

Resources: www.googleearth.com Cross Curriculum: Science – Scientific Inquiry and Scientific Process "

8. Use a compass rose and cardinal directions to describe the relative location of places.

GEO A 3.2

21st Century Skills: Information skills, Global Awareness, People Skills and Critical thinking. Lesson Ideas:  Making the Compass Rose Lesson – Students will create a compass rose by coloring and labeling the cardinal and intermediate directions. Students will then paste their compass roses on a poster board in corresponding order of the directions. Students will then use a map of the United States and the associated compass rose to locate states in relation to one another. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference www.ecarter.k12.mo.us for geography games and interactive lessons regarding mapping.

Resources: Compass Rose Activity Guide, US Map and Interactive Technology, www.maps.com/games/ Cross Curriculum: Art 21st Century Skills: Information skills, Global Awareness and Creativity Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

48

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Use map elements or coordinates to locate physical and human features of North America. (cont.)

INDICATOR 9. Read and interpret maps by using the map title, map key, direction indicator and symbols to answer questions about the local community.

REF.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

GEO A 3.3

Lesson Ideas:  Neighborhood Map Machine Lesson – Students will create a map of their neighborhood including the map title, map key, direction indicator and symbols for their neighborhood. Technology: Interactive Technology, map quest project, internet research (log in, start and exit programs) Resources: Map Machine Software (Gurney Server) and Computers Cross Curriculum: Math – Coordinate Systems

"

10. Use a number/letter grid system to locate physical and human features on a map.

GEO A 3.4

21st Century Skills: Information skills, Global Awareness and Creativity Lesson Ideas:  Trailblazers Unit 7 Mapping and Mapping Lesson 4 Mr. Origin. Students will use a numbered grid system to move an object through a designated mapping system. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference www.ecarter.k12.mo.us for geography games and interactive lessons regarding mapping. Resources: Trailblazers resource guide and Mr. Origin hardware Cross Curriculum: Math – Mapping Coordinates

"

11. Identify the location of the equator, Arctic Circle, Antarctic Circle, North Pole, South Pole, Prime Meridian, the tropics and the hemispheres on maps and globes.

GEO A 3.5

21st Century Skills: Information skills, Global Awareness and Creativity Lesson Ideas:  Papier-Mâché Globes – Students will make globes according to scale out of papier-mâché. The globes will be labeled with the oceans, continents, prime meridian and equator. Students will also be able to identify the hemispheres. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference www.ecarter.k12.mo.us for geography games and interactive lessons regarding mapping. Resources: Art supplies and activity guide, atlas and globe Cross Curriculum: Art. Math – Measurement standard 21st Century Skills: Global Awareness and Creativity

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

49

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the physical and human characteristics of places and regions in North America.

INDICATOR 12. Identify and describe the landforms and climate, vegetation, population and economic characteristics of the local community.

GEO B 3.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a mini-atlas of our community that will include a page on landforms, climate, vegetation, population and the economic characteristics. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference www.ecarter.k12.mo.us for geography games and interactive lessons regarding mapping. Resources: www.nationalatlas.gov to create maps Cross Curriculum: Art, Writing-informational text, Math-statistical information 21st Century Skills: Communication, Creativity, Economic Literacy, Civic Literacy

Identify and explain ways people have affected the physical environment of North America and analyze the positive and negative consequences.

13. Identify ways that physical characteristics of the environment (i.e., landforms, bodies of water, climate and vegetation) affect and have been modified by the local community.

GEO C 3.7

Lesson Ideas:  Chagrin Falls unit. Students will identify and discuss the dam on the Chagrin River and its affect on the community. Students will discuss the importance of waterpower in relation to the mills that were prevalent in the late 1800’s. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference local historical photographs that display the changes in our local community. www.ohiomemory.org. Students will create on-line scrapbook of photographs. www.google.com/googleearth may be used to current photographs of Chagrin Falls. Resources: Chagrin Falls: An Ohio Village History by the Chagrin Falls Historical Society – Editor Laura Gorretta; Photographs of community. Chagrin Falls historical slideshow. Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications - Research 21st Century Skills: Communication, Self Direction and Critical thinking

Analyze ways that transportation and communication relate to patterns of settlement and economic activity.

14. Identify systems of transportation used to move people and products and systems of communication used to move ideas from place to place.

GEO D 3.8

Lesson Ideas:  Create Venn Diagrams that compare transportation and communication past and present. Technology: www.ohiohistorycentral.org for information and photographs to use as a part of final Venn Diagram. Resources: Chagrin Falls History Book, www.ohiohistorycentral.org Cross Curriculum: Writing for information, Viewing and Speaking 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking, Communication and Information Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

50

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK ECONOMICS Explain the opportunity costs involved in the allocation of scarce productive resources.

Explain why entrepreneurship, capital goods, technology, specialization and division of labor are important in the production of goods and services.

INDICATOR 15. Define opportunity cost and give an example of the opportunity cost of a personal decision.

E A 3.1

16. Identify people who purchase goods and services as consumers and people who make goods or provide services as producers.

E B 3.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  Third Grade Business – Students will create a grade level company that will promote a movie that will be shown for grades one through three. The students will be responsible for every aspect of the implementation and production of the goods and services provided by the company. Students will identify opportunity cost in relation to their target demographic, identify the people who will be purchasing their goods and services, discover the concept of division of labor and identify their competition. Students will develop candy bags for a snack during the movie, create jobs for every third grader and sell tickets for a movie. The students will discover the concept of overhead and set their target profit margin that will be donated to a charity. *This lesson clarification outlines the skills and methods for all of the third grade benchmarks for economics. Technology: Students will use computers to create and print signs for the promotion of the movie. The Interactive Technology will be used as a model to create advertisements for the movie. www.econedlink.org, www.benandjerrys.com www.kidsbank.com and other websites can be used to supplement other aspects of economics not visited by the third grade business activity. Resources: Activity guide, Econ and Me Video, Movie Projector, Candy Snack Bags and the gym and chairs Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense and Measurement Standard: Language Arts – Persuasive writing and presentation skills 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – leadership, adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship) Lesson Ideas:  Third Grade Business – Students will create a grade level company that will promote a movie that will be shown for grades one through three. The students will be responsible for every aspect of the implementation and production of the goods and services provided by the company. Students will identify opportunity cost in relation to their target demographic, identify the people who will be purchasing their goods and services, discover the concept of division of labor and identify their competition. Students will develop candy bags for a snack during the movie, create jobs for every third grader and sell tickets for a movie. The students will discover the concept of overhead and set their target profit margin that will be donated to a charity. Technology: Students will use computers to create and print signs for the promotion of the movie. The Interactive Technology will be used as a model to create advertisements for the movie. www.econedlink.org www.benandjerrys.com www.kidsbank.com and other websites can be used to supplement other aspects of economics not visited by the third grade business activity. Resources: Activity guide, Econ and Me Video, Movie Projector, Candy Snack Bags and the gym and chairs Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense and Measurement Standard: Language Arts – Persuasive writing and presentation skills 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – leadership, adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship)

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

51

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Explain why entrepreneurship, capital goods, technology, specialization and division of labor are important in the production of goods and services. (cont.)

INDICATOR 17. Categorize economic activities as examples of production or consumption.

E B 3.3

Lesson Ideas:  Third Grade Business – Students will create a grade level company that will promote a movie that will be shown for grades one through three. The students will be responsible for every aspect of the implementation and production of the goods and services provided by the company. Students will identify opportunity cost in relation to their target demographic, identify the people who will be purchasing their goods and services, discover the concept of division of labor and identify their competition. Students will develop candy bags for a snack during the movie, create jobs for every third grader and sell tickets for a movie. The students will discover the concept of overhead and set their target profit margin that will be donated to a charity. Technology: Students will use computers to create and print signs for the promotion of the movie. The Interactive Technology will be used as a model to create advertisements for the movie. www.econedlink.org www.benandjerrys.com www.kidsbank.com and other websites can be used to supplement other aspects of economics not visited by the third grade business activity. Resources: Activity guide, Econ and Me Video, Movie Projector, Candy Snack Bags and the gym and chairs Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense and Measurement Standard: Language Arts – Persuasive writing and presentation skills

"

18. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of specialization and the division of labor to produce items.

E B 3.4

21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – leadership, adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship) Lesson Ideas:  Third Grade Business – Students will create a grade level company that will promote a movie that will be shown for grades one through three. The students will be responsible for every aspect of the implementation and production of the goods and services provided by the company. Students will identify opportunity cost in relation to their target demographic, identify the people who will be purchasing their goods and services, discover the concept of division of labor and identify their competition. Students will develop candy bags for a snack during the movie, create jobs for every third grader and sell tickets for a movie. The students will discover the concept of overhead and set their target profit margin that will be donated to a charity. Technology: Students will use computers to create and print signs for the promotion of the movie. The Interactive Technology will be used as a model to create advertisements for the movie. www.econedlink.org www.benandjerrys.com www.kidsbank.com and other websites can be used to supplement other aspects of economics not visited by the third grade business activity. Resources: Activity guide, Econ and Me Video, Movie Projector, Candy Snack Bags and the gym and chairs Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense and Measurement Standard: Language Arts – Persuasive writing and presentation skills 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – leadership, adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

52

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how competition affects producers and consumers in a market economy and why specialization facilitates trade.

INDICATOR 19. Identify different forms of money used over time, and recognize that money facilitates the purchase of goods, services and resources and enables savings.

E C 3.5

Lesson Ideas:  Third Grade Business – Students will create a grade level company that will promote a movie that will be shown for grades one through three. The students will be responsible for every aspect of the implementation and production of the goods and services provided by the company. Students will identify opportunity cost in relation to their target demographic, identify the people who will be purchasing their goods and services, discover the concept of division of labor and identify their competition. Students will develop candy bags for a snack during the movie, create jobs for every third grader and sell tickets for a movie. The students will discover the concept of overhead and set their target profit margin that will be donated to a charity. Technology: Students will use computers to create and print signs for the promotion of the movie. The Interactive Technology will be used as a model to create advertisements for the movie. www.econedlink.org www.benandjerrys.com www.kidsbank.com and other websites can be used to supplement other aspects of economics not visited by the third grade business activity.

"

20. Explain how the local community is an example of a market where buyers and sellers exchange goods and services.

E C 3.6

Resources: Activity guide, Econ and Me Video, Movie Projector, Candy Snack Bags and the gym and chairs Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense and Measurement Standard: Language Arts – Persuasive writing and presentation skills 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – leadership, adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship) Lesson Ideas:  Third Grade Business – Students will create a grade level company that will promote a movie that will be shown for grades one through three. The students will be responsible for every aspect of the implementation and production of the goods and services provided by the company. Students will identify opportunity cost in relation to their target demographic, identify the people who will be purchasing their goods and services, discover the concept of division of labor and identify their competition. Students will develop candy bags for a snack during the movie, create jobs for every third grader and sell tickets for a movie. The students will discover the concept of overhead and set their target profit margin that will be donated to a charity. Technology: Students will use computers to create and print signs for the promotion of the movie. The Interactive Technology will be used as a model to create advertisements for the movie. www.econedlink.org www.benandjerrys.com www.kidsbank.com and other websites can be used to supplement other aspects of economics not visited by the third grade business activity. Resources: Activity guide, Econ and Me Video, Movie Projector, Candy Snack Bags and the gym and chairs Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense and Measurement Standard: Language Arts – Persuasive writing and presentation skills 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – leadership, adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

53

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Explain how 21. Identify examples of competition affects economic competition in producers and the local community. consumers in a market economy and why specialization facilitates trade. (cont.)

E C 3.7

Lesson Ideas:  Third Grade Business – Students will create a grade level company that will promote a movie that will be shown for grades one through three. The students will be responsible for every aspect of the implementation and production of the goods and services provided by the company. Students will identify opportunity cost in relation to their target demographic, identify the people who will be purchasing their goods and services, discover the concept of division of labor and identify their competition. Students will develop candy bags for a snack during the movie, create jobs for every third grader and sell tickets for a movie. The students will discover the concept of overhead and set their target profit margin that will be donated to a charity. Technology: Students will use computers to create and print signs for the promotion of the movie. The Interactive Technology will be used as a model to create advertisements for the movie. www.econedlink.org www.benandjerrys.com www.kidsbank.com and other websites can be used to supplement other aspects of economics not visited by the third grade business activity. Resources: Activity guide, Econ and Me Video, Movie Projector, Candy Snack Bags and the gym and chairs Cross Curriculum: Math – Number Sense and Measurement Standard: Language Arts – Persuasive writing and presentation skills 21st Century Skills: (ICT Literacy and Thinking and Learning Skills – Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Creativity and Innovation. Life Skills – leadership, adaptability. 21st Century Content – Business and Entrepreneurship)

GOVERNMENT Identify the responsibilities of the branches of the U.S. government and explain why they are necessary.

22. Explain the major functions of local government including: a. Promoting order and security; b. Making laws; c. Settling disputes; d. Providing public services; e. Protecting the rights of individuals.

GVT A 3.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a book focusing on facts about local government and the corresponding functions and responsibilities. The book will include the current names of people in authority in our village and where their offices are located. It will also focus on each person’s responsibilities within our government and the balance of power (i.e. who they report to and who reports to them). Students will also write about where the village gets their funding for these services. Technology: www.chagrin-falls.org to research local government information either on Interactive Technology or individual computers. Resources: Field trip to Village Council, Junior Achievement lessons, Guest speakers Cross Curriculum: Viewing, Writing for information and Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration Skills, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Civic Literacy

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

54

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the responsibilities of the branches of the U.S. government and explain why they are necessary. (cont.)

INDICATOR 23. Explain the structure of local governments and identify local leaders (e.g., township trustees, county commissioners, city council members or mayor).

GVT A 3.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a book focusing on facts about local government and the corresponding functions and responsibilities. The book will include the current names of people in authority in our village and where their offices are located. It will also focus on each person’s responsibilities within our government and the balance of power (i.e. who they report to and who reports to them). Students will also write about where the village gets their funding for these services. Technology: www.chagrin-falls.org to research local government information either on Interactive Technology or individual computers. Resources: Field trip to Village Council, Junior Achievement lessons, Guest speakers Cross Curriculum: Viewing, Writing for information and Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications

"

24. Identify the location of local government buildings and explain the functions of government that are carried out there.

GVT A 3.3

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration Skills, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Civic Literacy Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a book focusing on facts about local government and the corresponding functions and responsibilities. The book will include the current names of people in authority in our village and where their offices are located. It will also focus on each person’s responsibilities within our government and the balance of power (i.e. who they report to and who reports to them). Students will also write about where the village gets their funding for these services. Technology: www.chagrin-falls.org to research local government information either on Interactive Technology or individual computers. Resources: Field trip to Village Council, Junior Achievement lessons, Guest speakers Cross Curriculum: Viewing, Writing for information and Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration Skills, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Civic Literacy

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

55

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the responsibilities of the branches of the U.S. government and explain why they are necessary. (cont.)

INDICATOR 25. Identify goods and services provided by local government, why people need them and the source of funding (taxation).

GVT A 3.4

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a book focusing on facts about local government and the corresponding functions and responsibilities. The book will include the current names of people in authority in our village and where their offices are located. It will also focus on each person’s responsibilities within our government and the balance of power (i.e. who they report to and who reports to them). Students will also write about where the village gets their funding for these services. Technology: www.chagrin-falls.org to research local government information either on Interactive Technology or individual computers. Resources: Field trip to Village Council, Junior Achievement lessons, Guest speakers Cross Curriculum: Viewing, Writing for information and Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration Skills, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Civic Literacy

"

26. Define power and authority.

GVT A 3.5

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a book focusing on facts about local government and the corresponding functions and responsibilities. The book will include the current names of people in authority in our village and where their offices are located. It will also focus on each person’s responsibilities within our government and the balance of power (i.e. who they report to and who reports to them). Students will also write about where the village gets their funding for these services. Technology: www.chagrin-falls.org to research local government information either on Interactive Technology or individual computers. Resources: Field trip to Village Council, Junior Achievement lessons, Guest speakers Cross Curriculum: Viewing, Writing for information 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration Skills, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Civic Literacy

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

56

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the responsibilities of the branches of the U.S. government and explain why they are necessary. (cont.)

INDICATOR 27. Explain why the use of power without legitimate authority is unjust (e.g., bullying, stealing).

GVT A 3.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a book focusing on facts about local government and the corresponding functions and responsibilities. The book will include the current names of people in authority in our village and where their offices are located. It will also focus on each person’s responsibilities within our government and the balance of power (i.e. who they report to and who reports to them). Students will also write about where the village gets their funding for these services. Technology: www.chagrin-falls.org to research local government information either on Interactive Technology or individual computers. Resources: Field trip to Village Council, Junior Achievement lessons, Guest speakers Cross Curriculum: Viewing, Writing for Information and Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills, Collaboration Skills, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility, Civic Literacy

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Explain how citizens 28. Describe how people CRR take part in civic life help to make the A in order to promote community a better place 3.1 the common good. in which to live including: a. Working to preserve the environment; b. Helping the homeless; c. Restoring houses in low-income areas; d. Supporting education; e. Planning community events; f. Starting a business.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  Students will work on a year-long recycling project. Students can choose to participate in the third grade Gurney Service-Learning Club in which there are a variety of service projects. Technology: Interactive Technology Unitedstreaming segment video of the benefits of recycling Resources: Albiti Recycling Co. Cross Curriculum: Science 21st Century Skills: Civic Mindedness, Social Responsibility

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

57

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Explain how citizens 29. Demonstrate take part in civic life effective citizenship in order to promote traits including: the common good. a. Civility; (cont.) b. Respect for the rights and dignity of each person; c. Volunteerism; d. Compromise; e. Compassion; f. Persistence in achieving goals; g. Civic-mindedness. Identify rights and 30. Describe the responresponsibilities of sibilities of citizenship citizenship in the with emphasis on: United States that are a. Voting; important for b. Obeying laws; preserving democratic c. Respecting the rights government. of others; d. Being informed about current issues; e. Paying taxes. SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain information 31. Obtain information from a variety of about local issues from a primary and variety of sources secondary sources including: using the component a. Maps; parts of the source. b. Photos; c. Oral histories; d. Newspapers; e. Letters; f. Artifacts; g. Documents.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CRR A 3.2

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Tiger PRIDE program, problem-solving conferences. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com for role play activities Resources: First Six Weeks of School, www.responsiveclassroom.com Cross Curriculum: Writing Applications and Language Arts – Informational Text and Non-Fiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Collaboration Skills, Communication and Information Skills, Problem Solving Skills, Personal Productivity, Personal Responsibility, Ethics, Accountability, Leadership, Accountability, People Skills, Self Direction

CRR B 3.3

Lesson Ideas:  Through an integrated guided reading unit, students will be able to identify roles and responsibilities of citizenship. Technology: www.scholastic.com Resources: The Kid Who Ran for President by Dan Gutman, Class President, Marvin Redpost: Class President by Louis Sachar Cross Curriculum: Reading, text connections, response to literal and inferential questions 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking, Personal Responsibility, Social Responsibility

SM A 3.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will determine changes over time by using both past and present photographs of our local community. These changes over time will reflect the corresponding aspects of our local community, business, architecture, physical features, employment, education, transportation, technology, religion and recreation. Technology: Use Interactive Technology or computer to have students reference local historical photographs that display the changes in our local community. www.ohiomemory.org. Students will create on-line scrapbook of photographs. www.google.com/googleearth may be used to current photographs of Chagrin Falls. Resources: Chagrin Falls: An Ohio Village History by the Chagrin Falls Historical Society – Editor Laura Gorretta; Photographs of community. Chagrin Falls historical slideshow. Cross Curriculum: Language Arts – Writing Applications – Research and Language Arts – Informational Text and NonFiction Applications 21st Century Skills: Communication, Self Direction and Critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

58

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Obtain information 32. Locate information from a variety of using various parts of a primary and source including: secondary sources a. The table of using the component contents; parts of the source. b. Title page; (cont.) c. Illustrations; d. Keyword searches. Use a variety of 33. Identify possible sources to organize cause and effect information and draw relationships. inferences.

SM A 3.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a formal animal report, integrating the identified elements. Technology: www.infoohio.org Resources: Various nonfiction texts, internet websites, magazines Cross Curriculum: Science, Writing informational reports

SM B 3.3

21st Century Skills: Communication and Information Skills, Personal Productivity, Self Direction Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Tiger PRIDE program, problem-solving conferences. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com for role play activities Resources: First Six Weeks of School, www.responsiveclassroom.com Cross Curriculum: Writing Applications

"

34. Read and interpret pictographs, bar graphs and charts.

SM B 3.4

21st Century Skills: Collaboration Skills, Communication and Information Skills, Problem Solving Skills, Personal Productivity, Personal Responsibility, Ethics, Accountability, Leadership, Accountability, People Skills, Self Direction Lesson Ideas:  Trailblazers Unit One: Graphing Concepts Technology: Graph Club software, Interactive Technology graphing concepts interactive games Resources: Trailblazers curriculum and resource guides Cross Curriculum: Math

Communicate social studies information using graphs or tables.

35. Communicate information using pictographs and bar graphs.

SM C 3.5

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Lesson Ideas:  Trailblazers Unit One: Graphing Concepts Technology: Graph Club software, Interactive Technology graphing concepts interactive games Resources: Trailblazers curriculum and resource guides Cross Curriculum: Math 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

59

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 3 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Use problem-solving 36. Use a problemskills to make solving/decision-making decisions individually process which includes: and in groups. a. Identifying a problem; b. Gathering information; c. Listing and considering options; d. Considering advantages and disadvantages of options; e. Choosing and implementing a solution.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

SM D 3.6

Lesson Ideas:  Responsive Classroom – morning meeting, creating classroom rules and logical consequences, hopes and dreams, Tiger PRIDE program, problem-solving conferences. Technology: www.responsiveclassroom.com for role play activities Resources: First Six Weeks of School, www.responsiveclassroom.com Cross Curriculum: Writing Applications 21st Century Skills: Collaboration Skills, Communication and Information Skills, Problem Solving Skills, Personal Productivity, Personal Responsibility, Ethics, Accountability, Leadership, Accountability, People Skills, Self Direction

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

60

GRADE 4

61

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Construct time lines to demonstrate an understanding of units of time and chronological order.

Describe the cultural patterns that are evident in North America today as a result of exploration, colonization and conflict. "

Explain how new developments led to the growth of the United States.

INDICATOR 1. Construct time lines with evenly spaced intervals for years, decades and centuries to show the order of significant events in Ohio history.

H A 4.1

2. Describe the earliest settlements in Ohio including those of prehistoric peoples.

H B 4.2

3. Explain the causes and effects of the frontier wars of the 1790s, including the Battle of Fallen Timbers, on American Indians in Ohio and the United States. 4. Explain how Ohio progressed from territory to statehood, including the terms of the Northwest Ordinance.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

H B 4.3

Lesson Ideas  Students will create a timeline showing how Ohio became a state. This could be done while teaching history or government.  Students could also construct a timeline of prehistoric Native Americans. Technology and Resources - Use Timeliner to create a timeline http://www.shgresources.com/oh/timeline/ (dates for Ohio) http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/articles/howtomakeatimeline1.htm (how to make a timeline kid friendly) http://www.ambrosevideo.com/resources/docs/327.PDF (timeline of prehistoric Native Americans http://www.ohiokids.org/games/index.shtml (game students can play online about events in history of Ohio) Lesson Ideas  Compare different groups that have settled in Ohio. o Use a systematic feature analysis to see how they are alike and different. o Analyze how different settlements influenced our society today. (Example: names of cities and towns based off of Native Americans) Technology and Resources - http://pbs4549.org/onestate/lessons.htm (great lesson plans and descriptions for students to read. http://www.ambrosevideo.com/resources/docs/327.PDF (timeline of prehistoric Native Americans) Lesson Ideas  Create cause and effect graphic organizers for the frontier wars and the Battle of Fallen Timbers. Identify how the effect on the Indians of Ohio is different then those of the United States. Technology and Resources - http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=473 (great lesson with reading and sheets available, Includes primary resource pictures) http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=473 (reading on Battle of Fallen Timbers

H C 4.4

21st Century Skills - Critical thinking and problem solving Lesson Ideas  Create a timeline showing the progression from territory to statehood.  Review the Northwest Ordinance and see how it is different then our Constitution today. Technology and Resources - Use Timeliner to create a timeline http://www.shgresources.com/oh/timeline/ (dates for Ohio) http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/articles/howtomakeatimeline1.htm (how to make a timeline kid friendly)

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

62

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how new developments led to the growth of the United States. (cont.) "

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

5. Explain how canals and railroads changed settlement patterns in Ohio and Ohio’s economic and political status in the United States.

H C 4.5

Lesson Ideas  Create a picture book of the different modes of transportation. One page of each book should show a different mode of transportation and how it affected Ohio and the United States.

6. Explain the importance of inventors such as the Wright Brothers, Charles Kettering, Garrett Morgan, Granville Woods and Thomas Edison.

H C 4.6

Technology and Resources - http://www.railsandtrails.com/ (show primary documents of transportation in Ohio including pictures and train schedules) Lesson Ideas  Research different inventors in Ohio and explain their importance to Ohio and the world. Have students complete a jigsaw activity teaching other students about their inventor.

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Compare practices and 7. Describe the cultural practices and products of products of North various groups who have American cultural settled in Ohio over time: groups. a. The Paleo Indians, Archaic Indians, Woodland Indians (Adena and Hopewell) and Late Prehistoric Indians (Fort Ancient); b. Historic Indians of Ohio (Ottawa, Wyandot, Mingo, Miami, Shawnee and Delaware); c. European immigrants; d. Amish and Appalachian populations; e. African-Americans; f. Recent immigrants from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Technology and Resources - Students will research inventors and create a hyper-studio presentation or power point presentation with slides on each important inventor from Ohio. http://www.oplin.lib.oh.us/famousohioans/inventors/puzzler.html (a very good game students can play online about all of the inventors of Ohio) PS A 4.1

Lesson Ideas  Compare and contrast the different Native American groups with a systematic feature analysis and write a paragraph explaining similarities and differences. Interdisciplinary Activity - In language arts each student will write a research report on a different immigrant group to America. Research should include contributions the group made to our society. Students will present the results of their research to the class. Technology and Resources - http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/Subject?subject=immigration (primary and secondary resources about Ohio’s heritage) http://www.nwoet.org/ohiotrek/teacher_index.htm (great site with lesson plans and charts focused on Ohio’s groups and their contributions) http://www.nwoet.org/ohiotrek/cg.htm (student site, extremely kid friendly, to learn about different groups of Ohio including Amish, German, Polish, African Americans, Latino and Appalachian) 21st Century Skills – diversity, critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

63

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the reasons people from various cultural groups came to North America and the consequences of their interactions with each other "

GEOGRAPHY Use map elements or coordinates to locate physical and human features of North America. "

"

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

8. Describe the impact of the expansion of European settlements on American Indians in Ohio.

PS B 4.2

9. Explain the reasons people came to Ohio including: a. Opportunities in agriculture, mining and manufacturing; b. Family ties; c. Freedom from political and religious oppression.

PS B 4.3

Interdisciplinary Activity - Students will read non-fiction and pictures books about immigrants coming to America. Examples The Star Fisher, Esperanza Rising, Journey to Ellis Island.

10. Use a linear scale to measure the distance between places on a map.

GEO A 4.1

Lesson Ideas  Student will utilize yarn to measure linear scale in Ohio, including the distance from Chagrin Falls to other major cities in Ohio.

11. Use cardinal and intermediate directions to describe the relative location of places. 12. Describe the location of Ohio relative to other states and countries.

GEO A 4.2

Lesson Ideas  Post the cardinal and intermediate directions in the classroom. Describe the location of students compared to other students in the room. Continue with a map of Ohio.

GEO A 4.3

Lesson Idea  Label maps of Ohio

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas  Using cause and effect graphic organizers, students can examine the effect European expansion had on Ohio Native Americans. Technology and Resources - http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/Subject?subject=american (Explores American Indian cultures in Ohio before, during, and after European settlement)

Technology and Resources - Students will complete a web quest on the Scholastic Website about Immigrants to the United States. http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/

Technology and Resources - http://www.ohiokids.org/games/oh/o02.html (Great game for students to play on line)

Technology and Resources - http://www.ohiokids.org/games/midgallery.shtml (game for students to play to help label cities of Ohio) http://www.ohiokids.org/games/midriver.shtml (games students play for rivers of Ohio)

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

64

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Use map elements or coordinates to locate physical and human features of North America. (cont.)

Identify the physical and human characteristics of places and regions in North America.

"

"

INDICATOR 13. Use maps to identify the location of major physical and human features of Ohio including: a. Lake Erie; b. Rivers; c. Plains; d. The Appalachian Plateau; e. Bordering states; f. The capital city; g. Other major cities. 14. Describe and compare the landforms, climates, population, vegetation and economic characteristics of places and regions in Ohio.

GEO A 4.4

15. Identify manufacturing, agricultural, mining and forestry regions in Ohio. 16. Explain how resources, transportation and location influenced the development of cities and industries in Ohio including major industries such as oil, steel, rubber and glass.

GEO B 4.6

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas  Create a candy map using different pieces of candy to show places in Ohio. For example use licorice for rivers and gumdrops for cities. Technology and Resources - http://www.ohiokids.org/games/midgallery.shtml (game for students to play to help label cities of Ohio) http://www.ohiokids.org/games/midriver.shtml (games students play for rivers of Ohio)

GEO B 4.5

Lesson Ideas  Students will work in cooperative groups to create a presentation about different regions of Ohio. Read about the different regions of Ohio and use a web graphic organizer to visually represent the different features of the regions. Technology and Resources - http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/Subject?subject=plants (reading about different regions)

GEO B 4.7

21st Century Skills - Collaboration skill and Communication and Information Skills Lesson Ideas  Students will use maps of Ohio showing the resources to explain patterns in Ohio. For example, locate the regions of Ohio that have more mining or agriculture.  Discuss why certain areas would be more likely to have manufacturing, agriculture, mining and forestry. Lesson Ideas  Discuss the location of the major cities in Ohio. What about them is similar (they are on water)?

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

65

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Identify and explain ways people have affected the physical environment of North America and analyze the positive and negative consequences.

17. Identify how environmental processes (i.e., glaciations and weathering) and characteristics (landforms, bodies of water, climate, vegetation) influence human settlement and activity in Ohio.

GEO C 4.8

"

18. Identify ways that people have affected the physical environment of Ohio including: a. Use of wetlands; b. Use of forests; c. Building farms, towns and transportation systems; d. Using fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides; e. Building dams.

GEO C 4.9

19. Use elevation, natural resource and road maps to answer questions about patterns of settlement, economic activity and movement.

GEO D 4.10

Analyze ways that transportation and communication relate to patterns of settlement and economic activity.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas  Compare and contrast different cities of Ohio. Students will look at environmental processes and the characteristics and discuss why people settled in certain areas. Technology and Resources - http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/Subject?subject=climate (integration of science)

Lesson Ideas  Students will compare geographical maps of 150 years ago to maps today. Students will articulate differences  Students will compare wildlife numbers from 150 years ago to now and share positives and negatives for all of the changes that have taken place in Ohio. 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

Lesson Ideas  Examine maps to answer questions. Technology and Resources http://www.msnucleus.org/membership/html/jh/earth/mapstype/lesson2/mapstypes02a.html

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

66

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK ECONOMICS Explain the opportunity costs involved in the allocation of scarce productive resources. "

Explain why entrepreneurship, capital goods, technology, specialization and division of labor are important in the production of goods and services. Explain how competition affects producers and consumers in a market economy and why specialization facilitates trade. "

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

20. Identify the productive resources needed to produce a good or service and suggest opportunity costs for the resources involved. 21. Explain how the availability of productive resources in Ohio promotes specialization in the production of goods and services and leads to trade. 22. Explain how entrepreneurs organize productive resources to produce goods and services and that they seek to make profits by taking risks.

E A 4.1

23. Explain ways in which individuals and households obtain and use income.

E C 4.4

Lesson Ideas  Organize a trade fair or city with your classroom that allows students to see the opportunity costs of making a product. Have students trace back the materials for the goods they produce to land resources. 21st Century Skills - Creativity and Innovation Skills, Personal Productivity, Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurship Literacy

E A 4.2

Lesson Ideas  Read the book Ox Cart Mule (language arts integration) and discuss what the farmer had to sell. Discuss how that is different today. Technology and Resources - Junior Achievement presentation 21st Century Skills - Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurship Literacy

E B 4.3

Lesson Ideas  Organize a class trade fair where students are the entrepreneurs. Students must generate a product they will trade for other products. Students will examine the risks they take to make their business work. 21st Century Skills - Creativity and Innovation Skills, Personal Productivity, Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurship Literacy

Lesson Ideas  Have students create a personal budget for a household. Students will first brainstorm how much they think things will cost in their household (heating bill etc.) and then generate a budget to use their income to cover their costs. 21st Century Skills - Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurship Literacy

24. Explain why people in Ohio specialize in what they produce and then trade with others, which then increases the amount of goods and services available.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

E C 4.5

Lesson Ideas  Divide students into groups and assign each group a job. Some groups will have specialized jobs like making one type of bookmark. Other groups will have more than one job, such as making bookmarks, stickers and stationary. Determine which groups were more productive. 21st Century Skills - Collaboration skill and Personal Productivity

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

67

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how competition affects producers and consumers in a market economy and why specialization facilitates trade. (cont.) GOVERNMENT Identify the responsibilities of the branches of the U.S. government and explain why they are necessary.

"

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

25. Explain why many jobs in Ohio depend on markets in other countries and why Ohio is a market for goods and services from other countries.

E C 4.6

26. Explain major responsibilities of each of the three branches of government in Ohio: a. The legislative branch, headed by the General Assembly, makes state laws. b. The executive branch, headed by the governor, carries out and enforces laws made by the General Assembly. c. The judicial branch, headed by the Ohio Supreme Court, interprets and applies the law. 27. Explain why elections are used to select leaders and decide issues.

GVT A 4.1

Lesson Ideas  For homework students will analyze different products at home, create a list of those products and determine where each one originates. Discuss why some products can come from other places but others need to come from closer to our homes. 21st Century Skills - Collaboration skill and Personal Productivity and Global Awareness

Lesson Ideas  Create a tree depicting the three branches of Ohio government. Have students put leaves on the tree representing the responsibilities of each branch of government. Technology and Resources - Use Inspiration software to create webs about each branch of government. http://www.northcanton.sparcc.org/~elem/interactivities/ohio/OhioGov_content.html (online information for students to go through and test) http://pbskids.org/democracy/mygovt/index.html (great activity for students to see how government affects them)

GVT A 4.2

Lesson ideas  Conduct a mock election within the classroom. Utilize the activity to demonstrate how people had very different ideas and the importance of supporting those whose ideas agree with yours. Technology and Resources - http://www2.lhric.org/pocantico/election/election.htm (explains for students about electing a president) 21st Century Skills - Civic Literacy

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

68

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Give examples of documents that specify the structure of state and national governments in the United States and explain how these documents foster selfgovernment in a democracy.

28. Explain the purpose of a democratic constitution: a. To provide a framework for a government; b. To limit the power of government; c. To define the authority of elected officials.

GVT B 4.3

"

29. Explain that the Ohio Constitution tells how the state government should be organized and guarantees the rights of individuals.

GVT B 4.4

Lesson Ideas  Read the picture books We the Kids and explain the Preamble of the Constitution and how it becomes the foundation for our Ohio government. 21st Century Skills - Civic Literacy

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Explain how citizens 30. Describe the ways in CRR take part in civic life in which citizens can A order to promote the promote the common 4.1 common good. good and influence their government including: a. Voting; b. Communicating with officials; c. Participating in civic and service organizations; d. Performing voluntary service.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas  Analyze sections of the Ohio State Constitution. Complete a chart showing what the Ohio Constitution says and what it does. Technology and Resources - Explain how the system is set up with checks and balances in place.

Lesson Ideas  Survey parents about what qualities they feel makes a good citizen. Use the survey results to create a class list of what it means to be a good citizen. Technology and Resources - http://pbskids.org/democracy/vote/index.html (activity for students to see the importance of voting) http://congress.indiana.edu/modules/civic_participation/base.htm (movie showing civic participation) 21st Century Skills - Civic Literacy and Social Responsibility

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

69

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Identify rights and responsibilities of citizenship in the United States that are important for preserving democratic government.

31. Explain why personal responsibilities (e.g., taking advantage of the opportunity to be educated) and civic responsibilities (e.g., obeying the law and respecting the rights of others) are important. " 32. Explain the importance of leadership and public service. " 33. Explain why characteristics such as respect for the rights of others, fairness, reliability, honesty, wisdom and courage are desirable qualities in the people citizens select as their leaders. SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain information 34. Obtain information from a variety of about state issues from a primary and secondary variety of print and sources using the electronic sources, and component parts of the determine the relevance source. of information to a research topic: a. Atlases; b. Encyclopedias; c. Dictionaries; d. Newspapers; e. Multimedia/ Electronic sources.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. CRR B 4.2

Lesson Ideas  Discuss the responsibilities of citizens and how responsible citizens can make a positive difference in our American society. Create a list of activities that students can do to make a difference in our country. 21st Century Skills - Civic Literacy and Social Responsibility

CRR B 4.3 CRR B 4.4

Lesson Ideas  Discuss various roles for public service that have leaders. Describe the consequences if public service lacked leadership. Lesson Ideas  Divide students into groups and assign each group one characteristic of a leader. Groups will generate a definition of their assigned characteristic and give examples how a leader can show they have this characteristic. 21st Century Skills - Civic Literacy, Ethics and Social Responsibility

SM A 4.1

Interdisciplinary Activity - Research immigrants to Ohio using the different resources. Require students use more than the computer to find information. 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

70

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Obtain information from a variety of primary and secondary sources using the component parts of the source. (cont.) "

"

Use a variety of sources to organize information and draw inferences. "

"

"

Communicate social studies information using graphs or tables.

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

35. Use a glossary and index to locate information.

SM A 4.2

Lesson Ideas  Complete a textbook scavenger hunt, showing students how to use the different parts of a book.

36. Use primary and secondary sources to answer questions about Ohio history. 37. Describe how archaeologists and historians study and interpret the past. 38. Identify main ideas and supporting details from factual information.

SM A 4.3

Lesson Ideas  Examine different resources to answer questions about Ohio history. For example, show the difference between a letter an immigrant wrote compared to an encyclopedia article on immigrants. What different information do the students get from each resource? Lesson Ideas  Divide class into groups: one group will be historians and one group will be archeologists. If we wanted to research the history of the Intermediate School, what would students in the two different groups need to do to get information? Interdisciplinary Activity - Read articles about Ohio in language arts and analyze to determine the main ideas and details.

39. Distinguish between fact and opinion.

SM B 4.6 SM B 4.7 SM B 4.8 SM C 4.9

40. Read and interpret pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs and tables. 41. Formulate a question to focus research. 42, Communicate relevant information in a written report including the acknowledgement of sources.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

SM A 4.4 SM B 4.5

Lesson Ideas  Students will create a list of statements about Ohio Native Americans. Students will distinguish between fact and opinion. Lesson Ideas  Students will bring in a graph they find in newspapers or magazines at home and share what the graph shows.

Interdisciplinary Activity - Write a research report in language arts that focuses on a social studies topic. Different topics include immigrants to Ohio, famous inventors, Native Americans of Ohio, and cities of Ohio.

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

71

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 4 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Use problem-solving skills to make decisions individually and in groups.

INDICATOR 43. Use a problemsolving/decision-making process which includes: a. Identifying a problem; b. Gathering information; c. Listing and considering options; d. Considering advantages and disadvantages of options; e. Choosing and implementing a solution; f. Developing criteria for judging its effectiveness.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. SM D 4.10

Lesson Ideas  Divide students into groups and have each choose a problem in the school they would like to solve. For example they want longer recess. Have them research all the pros and cons of a longer recess period. The students will use their research to determine if a longer recess makes sense. Have each group present their findings to the class. 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

72

GRADE 5

73

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Construct time lines to demonstrate an understanding of units of time and chronological order.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR 1. Create time lines and identify possible relationships between events.

H A 5.1

Timelines: Timeless Teaching Tool http://www.education-world.com/a_lesson/lesson044.shtml - Timeline resources for creating historical timelines for anytime period. (Interactive Technology) Autobiography Timeline http://www.northcanton.sparcc.org/%7Eelem/kidspiration/anderson/autobiographytimeline.htm - Use this Kidspiration activity as a graphic organizer to help students plan a time line of their lives or important people, or events in North American history. (Interactive Technology) (cross curriculum-language arts: Select, create and use graphic organizers to interpret textual information; Summarize the main ideas and supporting details) United States History Timeline http://www.mrnussbaum.com/history/history.htm - This website provides a timeline of US History from the 1500's to modern day. Each entry can be clicked on to get a page with more details. (Interactive Technology) Timeline Maker from Read, Write, Think http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/timeline/index.html - Timeline resources for creating historical timelines for anytime period as students choose from five different units of measure (date, time, event, entry, or other) and add specific descriptions of each entry. This program guides students through the process of organizing information in timeline form and results in a polished finished product. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills)

Describe the cultural patterns that are evident in North America today as a result of exploration, colonization and conflict.

2. Explain how American Indians settled the continent and why different nations of Indians interacted with their environment in different ways.

H B 5.2

American Indians and the Natural World http://www.carnegiemuseums.org/cmnh/exhibits/north-south-east-west/ - This site from Carnegie Museum of Natural History explores the culture of an American Indian tribe from four different areas of the United States; north, east, south, and west. The emphasis is on how the tribe interacted with the world around them. A good site for a comparison study of different Native American cultures. From this resource students can complete a four column graphic organizer from Kidspiration that compares Indian tribes based on their region. (Interactive Technology) (cross curriculum-language arts: Locate sources and gather relevant information from multiple sources (e.g., school library catalogs, online databases, electronic resources and Internetbased resources); compare and contrast important findings and select sources to support central ideas, concepts and themes.) First Americans for Grade Schoolers http://www.u.arizona.edu/ic/kmartin/School/ - This site offers information, activities, and links to help elementary students learn about Native American tribes. Information from this site can be used to discuss the history of major Native American Tribes and lessons based on stereotyping can be addressed. (cross curriculum-language arts: Locate sources and gather relevant information from multiple sources (e.g., school library catalogs, online databases, electronic resources and Internet-based resources); compare and contrast important findings and select sources to support central ideas, concepts and themes.) Emissaries of Peace-Electronic field trip This video describes the turbulent era after the French and Indian War where the Cherokee people struggled to preserve their independence. Students complete a graphic organizer activity that compares how the Cherokee lived vs. the colonial Virginian society and how these two cultures lived side by side. (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media &Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

74

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Describe the cultural 3. Explain why European patterns that are countries explored and evident in North colonized North America. America today as a result of exploration, colonization and conflict. (cont.)

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

H B 5.3

The Jamestown Online Adventure http://www.historyglobe.com/jamestown/ - In this interactive online game "You are the Captain of the Jamestown Colony. Can you do any better than the real colonists? You will have a copy of the London Company's Instructions to help guide you. Also, you can ask your fellow colonists and the Native Americans for advice. Be careful, though, because some advice is better than others! After you make all your decisions, you will receive a report on the state of your colony. Also, you will get to compare your colony to the historical Jamestown at the end." Zoom Explorers http://www.enchantedlerning.com/explorers/ - This site contains brief but useful information on a very large number of explorers, along with maps of their voyages. Students can use this to research and write a research essay on a particular explorer. (cross curriculum-language arts: Locate sources and gather relevant information from multiple sources (e.g., school library catalogs, online databases, electronic resources and Internet-based resources); compare and contrast important findings and select sources to support central ideas, concepts and themes. Generate a topic, assigned or personal interest, and open-ended questions for research and develop a plan for gathering information.) An Adventure to the New World http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/activity/newworld/ - This is a very well planned project where students role-play explorers. This lesson's purpose is to introduce the Age of Exploration. The focus is on key European explorers and their voyages. The students will identify reasons for explorations and describe the technological developments in shipbuilding and navigation that made long distance voyages possible. There are also many useful links for their research. Scholastic Research Starter: Plymouth Colony http://teacher.scholastic.com/researchtools/researchstarters/plymouth/ - This is an excellent collection on articles on everything related to the Plymouth Colony, such as reasons for colonization, impact on the Indians, daily life in the colony, important people, and more. There is also a large list of links to other web sites with more information. (Interactive Technology) Problem Solving Skills, Critical thinking and Problem Solving) (cross curriculum-language arts: Locate sources and gather relevant information from multiple sources (e.g., school library catalogs, online databases, electronic resources and Internet-based resources); compare and contrast important findings and select sources to support central ideas, concepts and themes. Generate a topic, assigned or personal interest, and open-ended questions for research and develop a plan for gathering information.) 13 Colonies Interactive Map http://www.mrnussbaum.com/13.htm - This is an interactive map of the 13 colonies. The map has many hot spots you can click on to learn more about that area, including each of the colonies and many of the major cities. Students can use this site to gather information on when and why each colony was established. (Interactive Technology) Christopher Columbus - from HippoCampus http://www.hippocampus.org/course_locator.php?course=US History&lesson=01&topic=2&width=800&height=550&topicTitle=Christopher%20Columbus - This learning module from HippoCampus covers Christopher Columbus, including his voyage to the New World, the reasons for the exploration, his interactions with the natives, and the culture of the natives. The site uses narration, images, animation, primary source information, interactive activities, and quizzes to teach and review the material. (Interactive Technology)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

75

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

Commerce - from HippoCampus http://www.hippocampus.org/course_locator.php?course=US%20History&lesson=02&topic=1&width=800&height=550&topic Title=Commerce - This learning module from HippoCampus covers commerce in the age of exploration, including the decline of feudalism, and the rise of capitalism, commerce, the middle class, mercantilism, and colonization. The site uses narration, images, animation, primary source information, interactive activities, and quizzes to teach and review the material. (Interactive Technology) 13 Colonies Webquest http://www.tesd.k12.pa.us/vfms/shaughnessy/task.htm - In groups students research an assigned colony and become experts. Students create a poster of the colony and give a presentation that reveals the culture and characteristics of this colony.

Describe the cultural patterns that are evident in North America today as a result of exploration, colonization and conflict. (cont.)

"

4. Describe the lasting effects of Spanish, French and English colonization in North America including cultural patterns evident today such as language, food, traditions and architecture.

5. Explain how the United States became independent from Great Britain.

H B 5.4

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration Immigration webquest http://www.hazelwood.k12.mo.us/~cdavis01/webquests/prw/ - Students play the role of an immigrant. They research one of the nationality's ancestral roots, and create a children's book telling about their life in the Old World, life in the New World, journeying to the New World, and their dreams for a new life. (cross curriculum-language arts: Produce informal writings (e.g., journals, notes and poems) for various purposes, Prepare for publication (e.g., for display or for sharing with others), writing that follows a format appropriate to the purpose, using techniques such as electronic resources and graphics to enhance the final product StateMaster - Immigration http://www.statemaster.com/cat/imm-immigration - StateMaster is a fantastic site for statistics on all topics concerning the United States. The information is nicely arranged by topic and can be viewed as totals, per capita, bar graphs, pie charts, or maps. The site allows you to see correlations (both positive and negative) between different statistical topics. This allows users to investigate relationships, causes, and effects. (Interactive Technology) (cross curriculum-math: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle graphs and line graphs, Select and use a graph that is appropriate for the type of data to be displayed; e.g., numerical vs. categorical data, discrete vs. continuous data)

H B 5.5

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication Revolutionary War Webquesthttp://www.bres.boothbay.k12.me.us/wq/nhicks/rd_map_student_page.htm - Students research important events from the Revolutionary War, taking notes, and clearly summarizing each event in two sentences, putting their final research into an illustrated road map. (cross curriculum-language arts: Generate a topic, assigned or personal interest, and open-ended questions for research and develop a plan for gathering information; Compare important details about a topic, using different sources of information, including books, magazines, newspapers and online resources) Causes for the Revolution http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ss5/b/causrev.cfm - This site teaches about the many causes for the Revolution and includes a vocabulary matching game with the related terms. Students can put this information in to different organizers outlining the causes. (Interactive Technology) (cross curriculum-language arts: Determine the meanings and pronunciations of unknown

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

76

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

words by using dictionaries, thesauruses, glossaries, technology and textual features, such as definitional footnotes or sidebars. The Shot Heard Round the World http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ss5/b/causerevmovl.cfm - This website has the student watch a short online video that explains the beginning of the Revolutionary War. After the video, they can take a seven-question quiz to check their understanding. (Interactive Technology) LIBERTY! The American Revolution http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/ - This web site from PBS covers headlines, timelines, resource material and related topics on the American Revolution, Daily Life in the Colonies, the Global Village, a Military point-of-view, and an online Revolutionary quiz. Students can examine why colonists decided to abandon England a join the revolution. 6 lessons are outlined.

Explain how new developments led to the growth of the United States.

6. Explain the impact of settlement, industrialization and transportation on the expansion of the United States.

H C 5.6

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration Westward expansion Webquesthttp://www.uni.edu/schneidj/webquests/standard9/intropage.html - This webquest is designed for students to explore various components of United States territorial expansion during the years 1801-1861.Students will have the opportunity to analyze and synthesize information obtained through their research by writing pieces for a newspaper. They will be creating an edition of a newspaper designed for publication during the time period mentioned above. (Cross curriculum-language arts: Summarize the information in texts, recognizing that there may be several important ideas rather than just one main idea and identifying details that support each. America on the Move http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthemove/ - At this excellent site you can read about how transportation shaped the lives, landscapes, culture, and communities of America. You can examine the changes brought by transportation networks, play some cool games, and check out lots of other resources from the National Museum of American History. There are also excellent teacher guides available for each section. 1848-1865: Gold Rush Era - Growth of Cities http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/themed_collections/subtopic1e.html - This is a great collection of primary source documents from Calisphere at the University of California. "These images record the rapid growth of small settlements into big cities as people continued to come to California from all over the world. Aerial views show spreading cities, and photographs depict the substantial hotels, stores, and other businesses that served the steady influx of new Californians." (Interactive Technology) 1870-1900: Closing of the Frontier - The Transcontinental Railroad http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/themed_collections/subtopic2b.html - This is a great collection of primary source documents from Calisphere at the University of California. "The transcontinental railroad connected the east and west coasts of the United States with a single rail line. This had a profound impact on the nation as a whole and on California - the end of the line - in particular. The images in this group show different aspects of the railroad, including workers, travelers, tracks, railroad bridges, and trains." (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

77

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

Innovation, Communication and Collaboration PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Compare practices and 7. Compare the cultural products of North practices and products of American cultural diverse groups in North groups. America including: a. Artistic expressions; b. Religion; c. Language; d. Food; e. Clothing; f. Shelter.

Explain the reasons people from various cultural groups came to North America and the consequences of their interactions with each other

8. Compare life on Indian reservations today with the cultural traditions of American Indians before the reservation system.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS A 5.1

PS B 5.2

Aztec/Mayan webquest http://www.lowermaclib.org/content/view/32/32/ - Students assume they are lost with a group of their friends in the jungles of Mexico. In order to survive, they need to join up with people who can help you. But you are faced with a critical decision should you travel east and join the Maya or travel west and become Aztec? (Cross curriculum-language arts: reading applications: informational, technical and persuasive text) Native American Web Quest http://www.ri.net/schools/Glocester/FMS/rooms/NAWeb/nativeamerican.html - Students will each choose a Native American tribe. They will research the tribe as well as complete the worksheet about their tribe. They will collate their research findings into a flap book and make an oral presentation. (Cross curriculum-language arts: Deliver formal and informal descriptive presentations recalling an event or personal experience that convey relevant information and descriptive details; Compare and contrast important findings and select sources to support central ideas, concepts and themes.) Native American WebQuest http://www.frionaisd.com/webquests/wiseman150.htm#Process%20clipart - Students research a North American tribe and make artifacts that depict the daily life of that tribe. They will add these things to the museum display of the Native Americans of one of five Native American cultures of the United States. The five cultures we will be considering are the Indians of the Northwest Coast, the Southwest, the Plains, the Northeast, and the Southeast. StateMaster http://www.statemaster.com/statistics - StateMaster is a fantastic site for statistics on all topics concerning the United States. The information is nicely arranged by topic and can be viewed as totals, per capita, bar graphs, pie charts, or maps. Best yet, the site allows you to see correlations (both positive and negative) between different statistical topics. This allows users to investigate relationships, causes, and effects. The topics areas include crime, economy, education, energy, geography, government, health, housing, immigration, industry, labor, lifestyle, military, people, elections, sports, trade, transportation, and more. (Interactive Technology) (Cross curriculum-math: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle graphs and line graphs, Select and use a graph that is appropriate for the type of data to be displayed; e.g., numerical vs. categorical data, discrete vs. continuous data.) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration American Indian Reservations http://www.uen.org/Lessonplan/preview.cgi?LPid=11914 - This lesson is designed to help students understand what life on a reservation is like. Students will discuss laws that affect American Indians (specifically why or how were reservations created) and how those laws had a positive and/or negative impact. This site provides a tremendous amount of resources. (Cross curriculum-language arts: reading applications: informational, technical and persuasive text) 1870-1900: Closing of the Frontier - Native American Assimilation http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/themed_collections/subtopic2c.html - This is a great collection of primary source documents from Calisphere at the University of California. "The images in this topic reflect the dissolution of tribal structure that occurred over the course of the 19th century. As traditional Native American lands disappeared or were taken

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

78

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

away, many aspects of their daily lives changed, including housing, clothing, food sources, livelihood, and religion." (Interactive Technology) (Cross curriculum-language arts: reading applications: informational, technical and persuasive text) Edward S. Curtis' The North American Indian: Photographic Images http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ienhtml/curthome.html - This is a great collection of primary source documents and images from American Memory at the Library of Congress. "In over 2000 photogravure plates and narrative, Curtis portrayed the traditional customs and life ways of eighty Indian tribes. The twenty volumes, each with an accompanying portfolio, are organized by tribes and culture areas encompassing the Great Plains, Great Basin, Plateau Region, Southwest, California, Pacific Northwest, and Alaska. Featured here are all of the published photogravure images including over 1500 illustrations bound in the text volumes, along with over 700 portfolio plates." (Interactive Technology) (Cross curriculum-language arts: reading applications: informational, technical and persuasive text) American Indians of the Pacific Northwest http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/pacific/ - This is a great collection of primary source documents and images from American Memory at the Library of Congress. "This digital collection integrates over 2,300 photographs and 7,700 pages of text relating to the American Indians in two cultural areas of the Pacific Northwest, the Northwest Coast and Plateau. These resources illustrate many aspects of life and work, including housing, clothing, crafts, transportation, education, and employment. (Interactive Technology) (Cross curriculum-language arts: reading applications: informational, technical and persuasive text) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Communication

Explain the reasons people from various cultural groups came to North America and the consequences of their interactions with each other (cont.)

9. Describe the experiences of AfricanAmericans under the institution of slavery.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS B 5.3

Slavery In The United States webquest http://sites.lps.org/wq33/ - Students explore the topic of slavery in the United States from various perspectives. Students will be engaged in researching, writing, and producing a videotaped newscast. Each student in a group will choose a different reporting role and gather information related to their role. After gathering information each student will write and prepare a segment for the newscast discussing the information they found. As a group they will then assemble all of their information and put it together as one newscast. (Cross curriculum-language art: fits all areas in the writing indicators for grade 5) Understanding Slavery http://school.discovery.com/schooladventures/slavery/index.html - This web site has lots of great info on slavery including a comparison of slavery around the world, a personal account of a slave's life through his own writings, teaching suggestions, additional resources, and a reenactment of a slave auction with detailed info on the views held by different members of society. Voices from the Days of Slavery: Former Slaves Tell Their Stories http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/voices/ - This is a great collection of primary source audio recordings from American Memory at the Library of Congress. "The almost seven hours of recorded interviews presented here took place between 1932 and 1975 in nine Southern states. Twenty-three interviewees, born between 1823 and the early 1860s, discuss how they felt about slavery, slaveholders, coercion of slaves, their families, and freedom." (Interactive Technology) No Master Over Me-Electronic Field Trip http://history.org/history/teaching/eft.cfm - Ann Ashby tells the story of her life as a free black slave during the days of slavery, and accounts the lives of slaves and white communities during the colonial period. Student activities include a perspective analysis graphic organizer and a compare and contrast Venn Diagram with a partner. (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration)

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

79

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the reasons people from various cultural groups came to North America and the consequences of their interactions with each other (cont.)

INDICATOR 10. Describe the waves of immigration to North America and the areas from which people came in each wave.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

PS B 5.4

An Ellis Island/Immigration WebQuest http://www.todaysteacher.com/EllisIslandWebQuest/GatewayToDreams.htm - Students will recount their immigration and Ellis Island experience through the creation of a diary using pictures, journal entries, letters, artifacts, inspection papers, currency, identification, etc. to complete all ten requirements. Additionally they must complete any three of the five Ellis Island Project Activities. Upon completion of their and projects they will prepare a brief 7-10 minute presentation of both their diary and projects. (Cross curriculum-language art: fits all areas in the writing indicators for grade 5) Scholastic Research Starter: Immigration http://teacher.scholastic.com/researchtools/researchstarters/immigration/index.htm - This is an excellent collection on articles on everything related to the immigration, such as Ellis Island, sources and destinations of immigrants, laws, economy, living conditions, and more. There is also a large list of links to other web sites with more information. (Interactive Technology) Immigration ... The Changing Face of America http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/features/immig/immigration_set2.html - This web site links educators to primary sources from the Library of Congress' online collections. It deals with where immigrants came from, why they came, where they settled, their effect on Native Americans and today's culture, and more. (Interactive Technology) StateMaster - Immigration http://www.statemaster.com/cat/imm-immigration - StateMaster is a fantastic site for statistics on all topics concerning the United States. The information is nicely arranged by topic and can be viewed as totals, per capita, bar graphs, pie charts, or maps. Best yet, the site allows you to see correlations (both positive and negative) between different statistical topics. This allows users to investigate relationships, causes, and effects. (Interactive Technology) (Cross curriculum-math: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle graphs and line graphs, Select and use a graph that is appropriate for the type of data to be displayed; e.g., numerical vs. categorical data, discrete vs. continuous data.)

"

11. Compare reasons for immigration to North America with the reality immigrants experienced upon arrival.

PS B 5.5

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication Immigration webquest http://www.hazelwood.k12.mo.us/~cdavis01/webquests/prw/ - Students play the role of an immigrant. They research one of the nationality's ancestral roots, and create a children's book telling about their life in the Old World, life in the New World, journeying to the New World, and their dreams for a NEW LIFE. (Cross curriculum-language arts: Produce informal writings (e.g., journals, notes and poems) for various purposes, Prepare for publication (e.g., for display or for sharing with others), writing that follows a format appropriate to the purpose, using techniques such as electronic resources and graphics to enhance the final product.) Coming to America: Immigration http://webtech.kennesaw.edu/jcheek3/immigration.htm - An informational website that provides multiple links to immigration facts and events. Immigration: Stories of Yesterday and Today http://teacher.scholastic.com/immigrat/index.htm - In this online activity from Scholastic, students will learn the various reasons people come to America through oral histories of recent and historic immigrants. Students also discover one of the most important aspects of American immigration history — Ellis Island as the preeminent immigration port of the early 1900s.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

80

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

Several graphing activities encourage students to explore immigrant history that exists in their own classroom and expose them to rich graphic organizing and research skills. (Interactive Technology) Scholastic Research Starter: Immigration http://teacher.scholastic.com/researchtools/researchstarters/immigration/index.htm - This is an excellent collection on articles on everything related to the immigration, such as Ellis Island, sources and destinations of immigrants, laws, economy, living conditions, and more. There is also a large list of links to other web sites with more information. (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration GEOGRAPHY Use map elements or coordinates to locate physical and human features of North America.

12. Use coordinates of latitude and longitude to determine the absolute location of points in North America.

GEO A 5.1

Where In The World Are You? A Webquest http://www.edina.k12.mn.us/cornelia/teach/sallyweb/intro.htm - Students create a story to demonstrate their knowledge of locating places on the globe or map. They will plan a trip to at least 5 destinations and the deserted island; giving clues as to the location with longitude, latitude, vegetation, landmarks, landforms, description of the people, plane flight numbers, miles between places, etc. This project may be done in a video, game, creative story, Hyper studio, PowerPoint, triptik map, or other acceptable options. (Cross curriculum-language arts: Produce informal writings (e.g., journals, notes and poems) for various purposes, Prepare for publication (e.g., for display or for sharing with others), writing that follows a format appropriate to the purpose, using techniques such as electronic resources and graphics to enhance the final product) Longitude and Latitude WebQuest http://ballz.ababa.net/longitude/webquest.html - Students travel through all of the continents of the world or in North America, one after the other. They start and end their journey from their current location. At each destination, they have to gather a map and some facts about the place. The winning group is the one who has traveled the shortest distance to complete the world trip. At the end of their "trip", they will have to make a presentation to the class showing the details of your trip. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

"

13. Use maps to identify the location of: a. The three largest countries of North America; b. The 50 states of the United States; c. The Rocky and Appalachian mountain systems; d. The Mississippi, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence rivers; e. The Great Lakes.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

GEO A 5.2

GeoSense Game http://www.geosense.net/ - GeoSense is an online geography based game. You play by yourself or compete against an online opponent to place a city on a map as quickly and accurately as you can. The maps include the United States, Europe, and the World. A fun and effective way of improving place name geography skills. There are no ads, banners, fees, etc, although you do have to make up a username and password to play. (Interactive Technology) Where's That US State? http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/games/game_wheres_that_us_state.html - This is a neat game from FunSchool that the students can play right on the web page. The game gives you a map of the US, and then gives you the name of each state one at a time. You then need to click on that state. A timer keeps track of how long it takes to complete all 50 states. History Scene Investigators - PBS History Detectives http://pbskids.org/historydetectives/games/hsi/ - Online game combines interactive Google maps with historical clues, images and audio to see if you can identify the location of famous events, landmarks, places, and geographic features. (Interactive Technology)

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

81

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

Mapping Our World http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/mappingourworld/mapping_our_world/index.htm - This great site has nine interactive activities all about maps. In Lesson 1 there are three activities that introduce students to maps and the globe. In Lesson 2 the three activities deal with the idea of projections. They present some of the most popular examples and analyze their similarities and differences. In the final lesson, there are three activities that investigate how different projections and orientations affect our view of the world. (Interactive Technology) States and Capitals test Identify the physical and human characteristics of places and regions in North America.

14. Describe and compare the landforms, climates, population, culture and economic characteristics of places and regions in North America.

GEO B 5.3

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills Landforms - A Web Quest http://www.geocities.com/tonyswebquests/webquest_landforms.html - In this web quest the student will: 1) View examples of landforms in the United States 2) Locate the places where these landforms can be found 3) Make an illustrated Landform Dictionary. (Cross curriculum-language arts: Produce informal writings (e.g., journals, notes and poems) for various purposes, Prepare for publication (e.g., for display or for sharing with others), writing that follows a format appropriate to the purpose, using techniques such as electronic resources and graphics to enhance the final product.) Illustrated Glossary: Landforms and Bodies of Water http://www.enchantedlearning.com/geography/landforms/glossary.shtml - This cute web site covers many different landforms and bodies of water, with drawings and explanations. There are also printable quizzes and worksheets. (Interactive Technology) World Landforms Interactive Map http://www.mrnussbaum.com/wlandforms.htm - This interactive map of the world has clickable hotspots for over 30 types of landforms. Each one shows you where that landform is found on earth, gives a picture of the landform, and then gives interesting facts, explanations, and historical background about the landform. (Interactive Technology) U.S. Landforms Interactive Map http://www.mrnussbaum.com/landforms.htm - This interactive map of the United States has clickable hotspots for dozens of specific landforms. Each one shows you where that landform is found in the United States, gives a picture of the landform, and then gives interesting facts, explanations, and historical background about the landform. (Interactive Technology)

"

15. Explain how climate is influenced by: a. Earth-sun relationships; b. Landforms; c. Vegetation.

GEO B 5.4

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration Global Climate Change http://www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/climate/GCclimate1.html - This resource gives a complete explanation of global climate change including how the greenhouse effect impacts global warming. (Interactive Technology) The Sun and The Earth http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/07/g35/seasons.html - This lesson helps students understand the relationship between earth and the sun and how this relationship affects the seasons on earth. (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication)

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

82

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the physical and human characteristics of places and regions in North America. (cont.)

INDICATOR 16. Explain, by identifying patterns on thematic maps, how physical and human characteristics can be used to define regions in North America.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

GEO B 5.5

Forest Type and Protected Area Distribution http://www2.wcmc.org.uk/forest/data/cdrom2/nam_for.htm - Teachers or students can use this map of North America to identify patterns and explain how physical and human characteristics can define regions. (Interactive Technology) Regional Foods http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/04/g35/foods.html - Using this Instructional Resource, students will explore the culture of different regions by learning about differences in food and recipes. This is a unique way to study the regions of the United States. The students will create individual or group maps of the United States and the world, based on what they have learned about various foods and recipes through Internet research. (cross curriculum-language arts: Locate sources and gather relevant information from multiple sources (e.g., school library catalogs, online databases, electronic resources and Internet-based resources). Defining Regions https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S03_BB_L05_I05_01.pdf - This instructional resource “Defining Regions” is an excellent lesson for guiding students to work in heterogeneous groups for the purpose of researching, and then sharing research, on different regions of North America. This research-based resource is from the Ohio Department of Education and is aligned to the fifth grade content standards.

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17. Use distribution maps to describe the patterns of renewable, nonrenewable and flow resources in North America including: a. Forests; b. Fertile soil; c. Oil; d. Coal; e. Running water.

GEO B 5.6

18. Analyze reasons for conflict and cooperation among regions of North America including: a. Trade; b. Environmental Issues c. Immigration

GEO B 5.7

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration How Much and Where? (distribution maps) Students read and analyze distribution maps identifying features, symbols, and resources. They then break into groups and create symbols to represent each resource on their own maps outlining where and why certain nonrenewable, renewable and flow resources are located. (Interactive Technology) (Cross curriculum-language arts: reading applications: informational, technical and persuasive text) Everything comes from Something http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/16/gk2/everything.html - In this lesson students will learn about renewable and nonrenewable resources and trace resources' points of origin by constructing and analyzing a product map. 21st Century Skills - 21st Century: Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration) Electronic Field Trip-Founders or Traitors? Founders or Traitors? From Subjects to Citizens - Interactive Lesson - This interactive timeline follows five Signers of the Declaration from 1760 to 1776: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Edward Rutledge, John Hancock, and George Washington. It also includes major events driving the move toward American independence. Selected events reveal each person s transition from British subject to revolutionary. (Cross curriculum-language arts: Make meaning through asking and responding to a variety of questions related to text. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

83

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify and explain ways people have affected the physical environment of North America and analyze the positive and negative consequences.

INDICATOR 19. Explain how the characteristics of different physical environments affect human activities in North America.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

GEO C 5.8

How Physical Systems Affect Human Systems http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/standards/15/index.html - A well articulated overview of some of the issues related to the fifth grade indicator. Examples are given as to just how physical systems do affect human systems. A good overview of the topic. (Interactive Technology) Natural Hazards http://www.usgs.gov/hazards/ - This standard covers how physical environments affect human activity in North America. The site is easy to navigate. (Interactive Technology) 1848-1865: Gold Rush Era > Environmental Impact http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/themed_collections/subtopic1d.html - s is a great collection of primary source documents from Calisphere at the University of California. "The images in this group show mines, miners at work, and the tools they used. They also illustrate the effect of the mines and the mining industry on California's landscape. Rivers were dammed or became clogged with sediment, forests were logged to provide needed timber, and the land was torn up - all in pursuit of gold." (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - 21st Century: Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

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20. Analyze the positive and negative consequences of human changes to the physical environment including: a. Great Lakes navigation; b. Highway systems; c. Irrigation; d. Mining; e. Introduction of new species.

GEO C 5.9

Introduced Species: http://www.epa.gov/maia/html/intro-species.html - This content resource from the United States Environmental Protection Agency explains how new species are introduced into an environment and the consequences of their introduction. Highway Construction Photographs http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/NewDetails?oid=1972163 - The fourteen photographs in this resource show highway construction projects in Lucas and Wood counties. Included are photographs of the construction of interstate highways I-280, I75, and the Ohio Turnpike. In the 1950s Ohio and other states began major projects to develop superhighways connecting major cities and other states. This resource will relate to student pre existing knowledge base and enhance the relevance of the standard to student's daily lives. Students will be able to view and analyze the effects by filling in a graphic organizer detailing their findings or on a poster. (Interactive Technology) Cleveland Lakefront Photographs http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/NewDetails?oid=946065 - This content provides three photographed views of the shore of Lake Erie. These photographs were taken between 1896 and 1900. This resource could be used to teach multiple standards and diverse content. One use of this resource is to use it to ask students to compare the shore of Lake Erie today, with that depicted in the photographs. (Interactive Technology) 1848-1865: Gold Rush Era > Environmental Impact http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/themed_collections/subtopic1d.html - This a collection of primary source documents from Calisphere at the University of California. "The images in this group show mines, miners at work, and the tools they used. They also illustrate the effect of the mines and the mining industry on California's landscape. Rivers were dammed or became clogged with sediment, forests were logged to provide needed timber, and the land was torn up - all in pursuit of gold." (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

84

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze ways that transportation and communication relate to patterns of settlement and economic activity.

INDICATOR 21. Use or construct maps of colonization and exploration to explain European influence in North America.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

GEO D 5.10

Exploration and Settlement: Map http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states/exploration_1675.jpg - This map gives a detailed description of the extent of settled areas in the United States in1800, indicated by pink sections. In addition, the map shows over 50 routes taken by early explorers, each indicated by different colors and styles of lines. Using this information student will create their own exploration and settlement map based on a European culture either independently or with a partner. (Cross curriculum-language art: fits all areas in the writing indicators for grade 5) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication

ECONOMICS Explain the opportunity costs involved in the allocation of scarce productive resources.

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22. Compare different allocation methods for scarce goods and services such as prices, command, first-come-first-served, sharing equally, rationing and lottery.

23. Explain that individuals in all economies must answer the fundamental economic questions of what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce.

E A 5.1

There’s Some Good in Gouging http://karenselick.com/GM980124.html - Ohio fifth grade teachers will find this an excellent resource. It asks students to compare different allocation methods for scarce goods and services. Allocation Methods https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S04_BA_L05_I01_01.pdf - This lesson plan comes from ODE and covers the topic of scarce goods. (Interactive Technology) Rationing Scarce Goods and Services http://www.fte.org/teachers/programs/efl/lessons/mon/eflmon4.htm - A high interest activity where students work in groups to rationing scarce goods in dealing with a t-shirt that is in high demand. (Interactive Technology) (Cross curriculum-language arts: communications: oral and visual)

E A 5.2

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication Hot Shot Business http://www.disney.go.com/hotshot/hsb.html - Become your own entrepreneur with this great start your own business online game. Choose businesses such as a skate park or comic book store and decide financing, marketing, customer needs, and other business components in hopes to make a profit! Main Economics Questions http://www.cr1.dircon.co.uk/TB/1/1.1.2.htm - This content resource accurately explains that individuals in all economies must answer the fundamental economic questions of what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce. Students create a hyperstudio show that describes the five main economic questions and gives examples for each fundamental question. What To Produce http://faculty.winthrop.edu/stonebrakerr/book/what_to_produce.htm - Offers a good explanation of factors to consider in deciding what producers should produce. The article provides a concise overview of the stated topic for the fifth grade teacher. The article touches on the concepts of allocative efficiency, opportunity costs, and also explains and gives an example of a production possibilities curve. Information from this can be used in conjunction with the hyerstudio project detailed above The Write Stuff http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM397 - Students work in cooperative groups to complete the next activity in which they identify the natural resources needed to produce pencils and use a map to locate a site for a pencil factory

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

85

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

including the transportation systems needed to deliver the products to consumers. Students also design a pencil or create a drawing of their own pencil design.

Explain why entrepreneurship, capital goods, technology, specialization and division of labor are important in the production of goods and services.

24. Explain how education, specialization, capital goods and the division of labor affect productive capacity.

E B 5.3

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration StateMaster http://www.statemaster.com/statistics - StateMaster is a fantastic site for statistics on all topics concerning the United States. The information is nicely arranged by topic and can be viewed as totals, per capita, bar graphs, pie charts, or maps. The site allows you to see correlations (both positive and negative) between different statistical topics. This allows users to investigate relationships, causes, and effects. The topics areas include crime, economy, education, energy, geography, government, health, housing, immigration, industry, labor, lifestyle, military, people, elections, sports, trade, transportation, and more. Students create a hyperstudio show that describes the four main economic questions and gives examples for each. (Interactive Technology) (cross curriculum-math: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle graphs and line graphs, Select and use a graph that is appropriate for the type of data to be displayed; i.e. numerical vs. categorical data, discrete vs. continuous data.)

Division of Labor http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/Social_Studies/Economics/ECO0003.html - A fun procedure to use to introduce students to the assembly line process and compare it to the cottage industry. Students, in two different groups, will assemble paper hotair balloons. Students create a hyperstudio show that describes the four main economic questions and gives examples for each. Champion Reaping and Mowing Machines Brochure http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/NewDetails?oid=942607 - Using this resource would be a good addition to any lesson teaching students about technology and its effect on the production and goods of services. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Explain how competition affects producers and consumers in a market economy and why specialization facilitates trade.

25. Explain how regions in North America become interdependent when they specialize in what they produce best and then trade with other regions inside and outside North America to increase the amount and variety of goods and services available.

E C 5.4

Why Trade? http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/economics/trade/ohlin.html - This comprehensive resource uses the Heckscher-Ohlin theory to explain why countries trade goods and services with each other. (smartbaord) Where Did You Come From? http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM448 - A very fun lesson that teaches students interdependency and specialization in regards to trade. Interactive on-line resources are used to teach the concepts. The lesson lends itself to differentiated instruction, because of the interactive technology, connections to life and the variety of on-line activities. Farming Rights and Product Specialization https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S04_BC_L05_I04_01.pdf - A lesson created by the Ohio Department of Education. It is a well thought out and complete lesson focusing on the nine farm regions in the United States. Students are asked to create a poster showing the products that are grown in each of the nine regions. I'll Trade You a Bag of Chips, Two Cookies, and $60,000 for Your Tuna Fish Sandwich http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM46 - The focus of this lesson is to understand how supply and demand is affected by specialization. Students complete a series of activities on line. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

86

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how competition affects producers and consumers in a market economy and why specialization facilitates trade. (cont.)

INDICATOR 26. Explain the general relationship between supply, demand and price in a competitive market.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

E C 5.5

Supply and Demand http://www.producingohio.org/action/supply/supply11.html - Offers an interactive graph modeling the principles of supply and demand. (Interactive Technology) The Changing Price of Corn http://www.producingohio.org/action/corn/corn1.html - This interactive on-line resource presents scenarios to students. Students evaluate each situation and determine if each will increase or decrease supply and/or demand. (Interactive Technology or lab) Demand Shifters http://www.e-connections.org/lesson7/lesson7.html - This interactive website created by E-connections allows students to learn about and immediately check their understanding of the relationship between supply, demand, and price. Why Do I Want All This Stuff? http://ecedweb.unomaha.edu/lessons/want3-5.pdf - An activity that focuses on advertising. Students are asked to look at different types of advertising to determine its influence on the consumer demand of products. (Interactive Technology) Economic Spotter: Supply and Demand at the Gold Rush http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM328 - Using this instructional resource, provide by EconEdLink a teacher can instruct their students about the general relationship between supply, demand and price in a competitive market while visiting the California Gold Rush. This lesson provides you with the resources that you will need to teach this lesson, as long as the teacher or students have access to a computer with the Internet. Supply and Demand http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ss5/b/ecosanddl.cfm - This web site explains the concepts of supply, demand, producers, consumers, and more. At the end of the lesson are two interactive activities to try that will let the students read stories dealing with supply and demand and apply what they have learned. Lemonade Stand Game http://www.coolmath-games.com/lemonade/ - This online game is the classic lemonade stand game where you try to make money by selling lemonade. You monitor the weather conditions, buy supplies, and set the price of the lemonade. This is a fun, simple, and effective way to teach supply and demand. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

"

27. Explain why competition among producers/sellers results in lower costs and prices, higher product quality, and better customer service.)

E C 5.6

Woolson Spice Company Trade Cards http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/NewDetails?oid=617806 - This content resource contains colorful, printed trade cards were created by the Woolson Spice Company of Toledo, Ohio. The company created cards to commemorate holidays, seasons, and significant events. The advertising on the back of the cards includes the text, "To secure a picture card like this you have only to Buy a Package of Lion Coffee." This resource could be used by teachers to demonstrate companies advertised their products before mass media was an available venue. Competition: Pizza http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM383 - In this lesson, students look at businesses, learn about competition in the marketplace, and see what happens when businesses compete with each other. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

87

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how competition affects producers and consumers in a market economy and why specialization facilitates trade. (cont.) GOVERNMENT Identify the responsibilities of the branches of the U.S. government and explain why they are necessary.

INDICATOR 28. Explain why competition among consumers/buyers results in higher product prices.

29. Explain major responsibilities of each of the three branches of the U.S. government: a. The legislative branch, headed by Congress, passes laws. b. The executive branch, headed by the president, carries out and enforces the laws made by Congress. c. The judicial branch, headed by the Supreme Court, interprets and applies the law.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

E C 5.7

Students will analyze store Ads from the Sunday paper to understand supply and demand. Students will use the store Ads to discuss consumer standpoint. How much would the students be willing to pay for a good or a service? Students will produce and create an advertisement for their own good/service and present it to the class. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication)

GVT A 5.1

Branches of Government http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/government/branches.html - This is an attractive and easy to understand site that explains the three branches of government. (Interactive Technology) The American Presidency http://americanhistory.si.edu/presidency/index.html - This exhibition tells the story of the American presidency through objects representing the lives and times of the country’s presidents. Topics include an examination of the President's many roles, life in the White House, and life after the presidency. The site includes an interactive timeline of Presidents, hands-on activities, reference resources, teacher materials, and more. (Interactive Technology) Levels of Government http://www.northcanton.sparcc.org/%7Eelem/kidspiration/merrill/levelsgov.htm - As part of a government unit, discuss the purposes of different levels of government and the words associated with each level. Students will create a graphic organizer using Kidspiration with words associated with each level. The Many Roles of a Member of Congress http://congress.indiana.edu/modules/many_roles/base.htm - Despite widespread coverage of Congress, what Members do on a daily basis is still a mystery to most people, even though several of those roles might be of particular benefit to them. This module gives an overview of Members' various roles, from national legislator and investigator to constituent helper, educator, and civic promoter. Interactive sections go through a typical day in DC, and then show some quite different roles back home. You will hear from experts and then try your hand at sorting out some of the challenges facing a new Member of Congress. How Does Government Affect Me? http://pbskids.org/democracy/mygovt/index.html - This interactive website shows a map of a typical community where you can click on different buildings to learn how the government affects many areas of life. The buildings include a park, courthouse, school, police department, fire station, TV station, library, hospital, Capitol, and more. President for a Day http://pbskids.org/democracy/presforaday/index.html - At this interactive site the student gets to be President for a day. First they fill in biographical information about themselves. Next they go through the day choosing how they wish to spend each hour. With each choice they learn information about that part of a President's duties. With several choices at each step, each student can have a completely different experience. At the end, a newspaper is generated that summarizes all the details of the student's day as President. (Cross curriculum-language art: fits all areas in the writing indicators for grade 5) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

88

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the responsibilities of the branches of the U.S. government and explain why they are necessary. (cont.)

Give examples of documents that specify the structure of state and national governments in the United States and explain how these documents foster selfgovernment in a democracy.

INDICATOR 30. Explain the essential characteristics of American democracy including: a. The people are the source of the government’s authority. b. All citizens have the right and responsibility to vote and influence the decisions of the government. c. The government is run directly by the people or through elected representatives. d. The powers of government are limited by law. e. Basic rights of individuals are guaranteed by the Constitution. 31. Explain the significance of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

GVT A 5.2

Inside the Voting Booth http://pbskids.org/democracy/vote/index.html - This colorful web site addresses voting in three different ways. first, it explains the importance of voting by looking at elections that came down to a few votes. Then it gives a history of voting by looking at important changes in voting over time. Finally, it gets kids to think about what issues are important to them by having them participate in a sample election. Election Process http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/election/index.html - These pages explain the election process for Federal officials, including President and Vice President, Senators, and Representatives. (Interactive Technology) Electing a President http://www2.lhric.org/pocantico/election/election.htm - This is a great election web site created by and for elementary children. It includes information on how the president is elected, a list of vocabulary words, puzzles, quizzes, a teacher's guide, links to additional resources, and more. The Importance of Civic Participation http://congress.indiana.edu/modules/civic_participation/base.htm - This interactive online module explains all about civic participation. Sections include ways to participate, where to go with problems (Federal, State, or Local), the importance of voting, how to contact legislators, examples of people who have made a difference, interest groups, and much more. Vote-B-Gone- A Political Cartoon http://www.pbs.org/pov/pov2004/election/cartoons/cartoon.html - In this content resource presented by PBS, the students view a two minute animated video about voting. This video uses contradictory reasons in a unique way to show students the reasons Americans should vote. (Interactive Technology).

GVT B 5.3

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration Historical Documents http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/documents/index.html - This is an attractive and easy to understand site that teaches about several important historical documents including the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution. (Interactive Technology) The Interactive Constitution http://www.constitutioncenter.org/constitution/details_explanation.php?link=010&const=01_art_01 - This interactive website provides the reader with the actual text of the constitution and a detailed explanation of the document. To Form a More Perfect Union http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/continental/intro01.html - This content resource is a seven-page article that chronicles the founding of our nation from Colonial resistance of British rule and the Revolutionary War, through the drafting and ratification of the Constitution. The Library of Congress’s American Memory provides this fantastic article. In this article the reader can click on the primary document provided and enlarge it for all to view. The article would prepare the educator for instructing about this time period, 1774 – 1789, in American history. This article explains the significance of the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution and the primary documents would make a great addition to any lesson. Tour of The Federal Government http://congressforkids.net/Independence_index.htm - This content resource is from Congress for Kids and covers the

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

89

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

significance of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Students read each section on the Declaration and the Constitution, and then take a little mini quiz on the section that they have read. Declaration of Independence and Constitution https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S05_BB_L05_I03_01.pdf - The lesson is divided into two sections (Declaration of Independence and Constitution). Students will gain an understanding of each document through various activities. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Explain how citizens 32. Explain how an CRR take part in civic life individual acquires U.S. A in order to promote citizenship: 5.1 the common good. a. Birth; b. Naturalization.

Citizenship http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/citizenship/index.html - This is an attractive and easy to understand site that explains how people are or become US citizens. (Interactive Technology) How To Become An American https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S06_BA_L05_I01_01.pdf - This lesson from the Ohio Department of Education utilizes a variety of instructional strategies to teach students about acquiring U.S. citizenship. Strategies include cooperative learning, graphic organizers, and kinesthetic activities. Naturalization http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=ce2b2cd1f7e9e010VgnVC M1000000ecd190aRCRD - This site explains how an individual acquires U.S. citizenship, both by birth and naturalization. The home page provides information on the requirements for naturalization and the link “Citizenship” contains information regarding citizenship by birth. There are many related links providing additional information on citizenship. This is an excellent site that is easy to navigate and directly aligned with this Benchmark and Indicator. (Interactive Technology) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Identify rights and responsibilities of citizenship in the United States that are important for preserving democratic government.

33. Explain the obligations of upholding the U.S. Constitution including: a. Obeying laws; b. Paying taxes; c. Serving on juries; d. Registering for selective service.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CRR B 5.2

How Can Citizens Participate? http://www.civiced.org/index.php?page=wtp_ms28_tg -This lesson addresses is the right to participate in governing our nation. The lesson will discuss the different ways you may participate. Students read and discuss the definition of the term "citizen." Students take part in a problem-solving activity in which they learn of various forms of political participation and they identify and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. The lesson ends with a discussion of why citizens should participate and what factors they should consider in making decisions about participation. "What Responsibilities Accompany Our Rights?" http://www.civiced.org/index.php?page=ES_Teacher_s_Guide - This lesson looks at an important question students will face as citizens: What responsibilities accompany our basic rights? The lesson begins with a class discussion of the importance of citizens fulfilling responsibilities in order to protect their rights. The class then engages in a problem-solving activity that examines specific responsibilities that might be connected with protecting the five basic rights studied in Unit Four, and poses the question of what might happen if citizens did not fulfill these responsibilities. Follow-up activity: Have students draw posters that illustrate responsibilities that are associated with each basic right. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovations, Communication

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

90

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify rights and responsibilities of citizenship in the United States that are important for preserving democratic government. (cont.)

INDICATOR 34. Explain the significance of the rights that are protected by the First Amendment including: a. Freedom of religion; b. Freedom of speech; c. Freedom of the press; d. Right of petition and assembly.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

CRR B 5.3

Amendments to the U.S. Constitution http://wisc-online.com/objects/index_tj.asp?objid=SOC5602 - At this interactive web site, students explore the history of U.S. Constitutional amendments and process involved in adding an amendment. In an interactive exercise, learners author their own amendments/explain why these should be added to the Constitution. Their comments can be automatically emailed to their teacher. The First Amendment - First for a Reason http://www.illinoisfirstamendmentcenter.com/freedoms.php - Resource to use while exploring the identified Ohio fifth grade Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities indicator. Using a short flash intro with sound and movement, this website is sure to keep students' interest. A short description is followed links that provide a user with examples and additional information. Know Your Rights http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/media/teachers/pdfs/2001F/011207wr1.pdf - Excellent content resource that also includes an assessment piece. The Time for Kids article on some of the Amendments to the Constitution addresses the standard designated for this lesson: explain the significance of the rights protected by the first Amendment. It also includes a statement on the use of a jury in the judicial system. The resource is explained in a manner that fifth graders should be able to comprehend. There also is a critical thinking approach in which students are able to tell how the Amendment is important to them. First Amendment Rights https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S06_BB_L05_I03_01.pdf - This instructional lesson, presented by the Ohio Department of Education website is a multiple-day lesson in which students will use a problemsolving/decision-making process and their knowledge of First Amendment rights to analyze and implement a solution for a school-related issue. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain information 35. Obtain information from a variety of from a variety of print and primary and electronic sources and secondary sources analyze its reliability using the component including: parts of the source. a. Accuracy of facts; b. Credentials of the source. "

36. Locate information in a variety of sources using key words, related articles and cross-references.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

SM A 5.1

SM A 5.2

StateMaster http://www.statemaster.com/statistics - StateMaster is a fantastic site for statistics on all topics concerning the United States. The information is nicely arranged by topic and can be viewed as totals, per capita, bar graphs, pie charts, or maps. Best yet, the site allows you to see correlations (both positive and negative) between different statistical topics. This allows users to investigate relationships, causes, and effects. The topics areas include crime, economy, education, energy, geography, government, health, housing, immigration, industry, labor, lifestyle, military, people, elections, sports, trade, transportation, and more. (Cross curriculum-math: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle graphs and line graphs, Select and use a graph that is appropriate for the type of data to be displayed; e.g., numerical vs. categorical data, discrete vs. continuous data.) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Electronic Field Trip Jamestown Unearthed: Teacher's Guide: Lesson One - Settling Jamestown - In this lesson, students will review the Virginia Company's instructions for colonists settling in Virginia, identify challenges and conditions the colonists encountered, and describe what life was like in early Jamestown. As a result of this lesson, students will be able to 1) read and analyze primary sources, 2) analyze the Virginia Company's instructions to the Jamestown colonists, 3) identify factors the colonists encountered

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

91

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

INDICATOR

while establishing Jamestown, and 4) describe what life was like in the early settlement. (cross curriculum-language arts: Apply self-monitoring strategies to clarify confusion about text and to monitor comprehension.) Electronic Field Trip Founders or Traitors? - Lesson Two - Primary Source Analysis - Students read and analyze primary sources, evaluate different points of view presented by primary source documents, and apply their understanding by writing their own "primary sources" using the appropriate voices. (cross curriculum-language arts: Apply self-monitoring strategies to clarify confusion about text and to monitor comprehension.) Electronic Field Trip No Master Over Me: Teacher's Guide: Lesson One - Trapped Between Two Worlds - Intended as a study of the free black population living in a slaveholding society, this lesson offers an alternative to the typical view of enslaved African Americans in colonial America. Students will be able to analyze primary and secondary sources to determine point of view, voice the perspectives of free and enslaved African-Americans in eighteenth-century Virginia, and compare and contrast the lives of free and enslaved African-Americans in eighteenth-century Virginia. (cross curriculum-language arts: Apply self-monitoring strategies to clarify confusion about text and to monitor comprehension.)

Obtain information from a variety of primary and secondary sources using the component parts of the source. (cont.)

37. Differentiate between primary and secondary sources.

SM A 5.3

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration Electronic Field Trip No Master Over Me: Teacher's Guide: Lesson One - Trapped Between Two Worlds - Intended as a study of the free black population living in a slaveholding society, this lesson offers an alternative to the typical view of enslaved African Americans in colonial America. Students will be able to analyze primary and secondary sources to determine point of view, voice the perspectives of free and enslaved African-Americans in eighteenth-century Virginia, and compare and contrast the lives of free and enslaved African-Americans in eighteenth-century Virginia. Electronic Field Trip Jamestown Unearthed: Teacher's Guide: Lesson One - Settling Jamestown - In this lesson, students will review the Virginia Company's instructions for colonists settling in Virginia, identify challenges and conditions the colonists encountered, and describe what life was like in early Jamestown. As a result of this lesson, students will be able to 1) read and analyze primary sources, 2) analyze the Virginia Company's instructions to the Jamestown colonists, 3) identify factors the colonists encountered while establishing Jamestown, and 4) describe what life was like in the early settlement. Electronic Field Trip Founders or Traitors? - Lesson Two - Primary Source Analysis - Students read and analyze primary sources, evaluate different points of view presented by primary source documents, and apply their understanding by writing their own "primary sources" using the appropriate voices. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

92

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Use a variety of sources to organize information and draw inferences.

INDICATOR 38. Read information critically in order to identify: a. The author; b. The author’s perspective; c. The purpose.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

SM B 5.4

Electronic Field Trip Jamestown Unearthed: Teacher's Guide: Lesson One - Settling Jamestown In this lesson, students will review the Virginia Company's instructions for colonists settling in Virginia identify challenges and conditions the colonists encountered, and describe what life was like in early Jamestown. As a result of this lesson, students will be able to 1) read and analyze primary sources, 2) analyze the Virginia Company's instructions to the Jamestown colonists, 3) identify factors the colonists encountered while establishing Jamestown, and 4) describe what life was like in the early settlement. (cross curriculum-language arts: Apply self-monitoring strategies to clarify confusion about text and to monitor comprehension.) Electronic Field Trip Founders or Traitors? - Lesson One - To Sign or Not to Sign? Students read and analyze biographical information, work cooperatively to explore differing viewpoints on independence and describe how race, gender, and social class might affect a person's political opinions. (Language arts: Apply self-monitoring strategies to clarify confusion about text monitor.)

"

39. Compare points of agreement and disagreement among sources.

SM B 5.5

21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration Electronic Field Trip Jamestown Unearthed: Sifting Through Time - Video Segment 3 Viewers see Jamestown settlers engaged in daily activities such as cultivating tobacco, storing muskets in an armory, and cooking. Historian Jim Horn debunks the myth that the early settlers were lazy gentlemen: Archaeological evidence indicates they worked very hard. Explore what happens to artifacts after their discovery: they are washed, sorted by context, catalogued, conserved, studied, and carefully stored. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking

"

40. Draw inferences from relevant information.

SM B 5.6

Electronic Field Trip Jamestown Unearthed: Digging for the Story - Interactive Lesson Jamestown stereotypes are often identified with the unlikely John Smith-Pocahontas romance, confusion over priority with Plymouth Rock, and other myths. This activity lets students compare their own Jamestown assumptions by identifying common misperceptions. Electronic Field Trip Character Trading Cards The Character Trading Cards tool allows students to create their own character cards, which they can then print off, illustrate, and trade or keep. Students will need to infer to describe a character, look at his or her thoughts and feelings, explore how he or she develops, and make personal connections to the character. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

93

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Use a variety of 41. Organize key ideas by sources to organize taking notes that information and draw paraphrase or summarize. inferences. (cont.)

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

SM B 5.7

Electronic Field Trip Founders or Traitors? - Final Evaluation Activity Students research a signer of the Declaration of Independence, organize and write about their research results. They evaluate the signer's contribution to American history, explain how the person's political stance and life events might have affected his views, and describe his life during and after the revolutionary War. Electronic Field Trip Treasure Keepers: Teacher’s Guide: Lesson One - Nothing Lasts Forever Students will identify six major agents of artifact destruction, observe and describe effects of these agents of destruction, and recognize conditions in their everyday lives that lead to deterioration of objects. 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Communicate social studies information using graphs or tables.

42. Communicate research findings using line graphs and tables.

SM C 5.8

Line Graphs http://www.studyzone.org/mtestprep/math8/f/linegraphl.cfm This web site uses clear explanations and diagrams to teach how to read and create line graphs. After the review, students can take an interactive quiz on the material. (cross curriculum-language arts: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle graphs and line graphs.) Using Line Graphs http://www.studyzone.org/mtestprep/math8/f/linegraphles.cfm This web site explains the advantages and disadvantages of line graphs, and provides an interactive quiz. . (cross curriculumlanguage arts: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle graphs and line graphs.) Electronic Field Trip Founders or Traitors? - Lesson One - To Sign or Not to Sign? Students read and analyze biographical information, work cooperatively to explore differing viewpoints on independence, and describe how race, gender, and social class might affect a person's political opinions. (curriculum-language arts: Read, construct and interpret frequency tables, circle and line graphs) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

94

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 5 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Use problem-solving skills to make decisions individually and in groups.

INDICATOR 43. Use a problemsolving/decision-making process which includes: a. Identifying a problem; b. Gathering information; c. Listing and considering options; d. Considering advantages and disadvantages of options; e. Choosing and implementing a solution; f. Developing criteria for judging its effectiveness; g. Evaluating the effectiveness of the solution.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

SM D 5.9

Researching and Interpreting History through Material Culture http://www.historyworksohio.org/tutorials/detail.cfm?id=2 - Using this resource teaches will explore with their students how cultural differences among American Indians and Europeans settlers caused disputes and conflicts. Electronic Field Trip No Master Over Me: Degrees of Freedom - Interactive Lesson - This activity builds upon the first activity and video segment to explore the degrees of freedom between fully enslaved and fully free. During the activity, a series of brief statements appear, each describing a characteristic of free/free black/slave life. The statement appears in all three columns (free/black free/slave), and students must decide where it does not apply. Electronic Field Trip Founders or Traitors? - Final Evaluation Activity - Students research a signer of the Declaration of Independence, organize and write about their research results. They evaluate the signer's contribution to American history, explain how the person's political stance and life events might have affected his views, and describe his life during and after the revolutionary War. (cross curriculum-language arts: (cross curriculum-language art: fits all areas in the writing indicators for grade 5) Electronic Field Trip Founders or Traitors? - The Hanging List - Interactive Lesson - In this activity, students play the role of British admiral Howe s aide in late 1776. In a video introduction, Admiral Howe says that a handful of radicals are fomenting rebellion, and if they can be captured, everything will settle down. He assigns the player to investigate a handful of prominent colonists, and then decide whether they might be persuaded to return to the British fold, or are incorrigible rebels that should be hanged if captured. The student must travel around Philadelphia (depicted by a period print of the waterfront) and gather information about each person on the list by interviewing local people. (cross curriculum-language arts: Locate sources and gather relevant information from multiple sources (e.g., school library catalogs, online databases, electronic resources and Internet-based resources) 21st Century Skills - Information, Media and Technology Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity and Innovation, Communication and Collaboration

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

95

GRADE 6

96

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Interpret relationships between events shown on multiple-tier time lines.

INDICATOR 1. Construct a multipletier time line from a list of events and interpret the relationships between the events.

H A 6.1

Lesson Ideas  Students will construct a multiple-tier timeline on a topic of their choice using Timeliner. Technology and Resources – Timeliner, http://www.hyperhistory.com/online_n2/History_n2/a.html http://www.mapsofwar.com/images/Religion.swf Interactive Technology students will use the Interactive Technology to put dates in chronological order.

"

2. Arrange dates in order on a time line using the conventions of B.C. and A.D. or B.C.E. and C.E.

H A 6.2

Cross Curriculum In conjunction with language arts students will research a significant American and relate events in their life to events happening around the world during that particular time period. Lesson Ideas  Students will construct a timeline putting dates in chronological order after discussions on various civilizations.  Students will construct a group timeline of Chinese history from the Shang and Zhou dynasties through the Yaun and Ming dynasties. The students will list major events, people, and inventions that were historically significant.  Mexico Unit: Students will create a comic strip of a country’s significant historical events with dates and drawings included. Technology and Resources – United Streaming (China: From Past to Present:)

Describe the political and social characteristics of early civilizations and their enduring impact on later civilizations.

3. Describe the early cultural development of humankind from the Paleolithic Era to the revolution of agriculture including: a. Hunting and gathering; b. Tool making; c. Use of fire; d. Domestication of plants and animals; e. Organizing societies; f. Governance.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

H B 6.3

21st Century Skills – collaboration skills and communication and information skills Lesson Ideas  Students will sequence events to show how one event impacts the next using cause and effect Technology and Resources – United Streaming (Our Neighbor to the South), http://www.ohiotreasurechest.org/cgi-bin/indicator_list.pl?course=CSS.L06 21st Century Skills – critical thinking and problem solving

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

97

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Describe the political and social characteristics of early civilizations and their enduring impact on later civilizations. (cont.)

Describe the effects of interactions among civilizations during the 14th through the 18th centuries.

INDICATOR 4. Compare geographic, political, economic and social characteristics of the river civilizations in the Tigris and Euphrates (Mesopotamia), Nile (Egypt), Huang Ho and Indus valleys before 1000 B.C. including: a. Location; b. Government; c. Religion; d. Agriculture; e. Cultural and scientific contributions. 5. Describe the characteristics of Maya, Inca, Aztec and Mississippian civilizations including: a. Location; b. Government; c. Religion; d. Agriculture; e. Cultural and scientific contributions.

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Compare cultural 6. Compare the cultural practices, products practices and products of and perspectives of the societies studied past civilizations in including: order to understand a. Class structure; commonality and b. Gender roles; diversity of cultures. c. Beliefs; d. Customs and traditions.

H B 6.4

Lesson Ideas  Students will use themed atlas maps to compare civilizations.

H D 6.5

Lesson Ideas After class discussions of Maya, Inca, Aztec, and Mississippian civilizations, the students will create graphic organizers to compare the four civilizations.  Students will complete a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the Mayan and the Aztec civilizations.  The students will determine by reading and note-taking the contributions each civilization has given to society.

Technology and Resources – http://www.mrdowling.com/603mesopotamia.html, http://www.harappa.com/har/har0.html

Technology and Resources – http://mayas.mrdonn.org/empire.html http://www.civilization.ca/civil/maya/mminteng.html http://www.pbs.org/opb/conquistadors/home.htm http://www.ology.amnh.org/archaeology/inca/index.html PS A 6.1

Lesson Ideas  The students will participate in a simulation of Chinese society. Students are assigned a Hsing (clan) and develop a banner of their beliefs, determine who the highest rank according to leadership has shown within the group, research calligraphy, Chinese kite flying, use of chopsticks, and virtues of each Hsing. (collaboration with team members)  The South American scrapbook, which includes labeling major landforms of a country, the culture of a country, weather of that particular country, landmarks of the country, and how that country got its independence. Cross Curriculum – Chinese, Art 21st Century Skills - collaboration, communication, and information gathering

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

98

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Compare cultural practices, products and perspectives of past civilizations in order to understand commonality and diversity of cultures. (cont.)

INDICATOR 7. Compare world religions and belief systems focusing on geographic origins, founding leaders and teachings including: a. Buddhism; b. Christianity; c. Judaism; d. Hinduism; e. Islam.

PS A 6.2

Lesson Ideas

 Students create graphic organizers of the 5 main religions comparing and contrasting the belief systems, geographic origins, leaders, and teachings.  The students will look at a world map with the origins of the 5 main religions and determine where each religion exists today.  The students will develop a compare and contrast paper between two religions.  The students will be given one of the following topics to research for each of the 5 main religions (holidays, ritual, costumes and traditions, major beliefs, origin and history, important people of the past and present). Students will present information orally.

Technology and Resources – http://www.mrdowling.com/605westr.htmlin http://www.mapsofwar.com/images/Religion.swf, Video “Basic Religious Beliefs” 21st Century Skills – diversity

Analyze examples of interactions between cultural groups and explain the factors that contribute to cooperation and conflict.

8. Explain factors that foster conflict or cooperation among countries: a. Language; b. Religion; c. Types of government; d. Historic relationships; e. Economic interests.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS B 6.3

Technology and Resources - Junior Scholastic magazine

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

99

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK GEOGRAPHY Identify on a map the location of major physical and human features of each continent.

INDICATOR 9. Place countries, cities, deserts, mountain ranges and bodies of water on the continents on which they are located.

GEO A 6.1

Lesson Ideas  The students label the countries for the continents of Central America, Caribbean Islands, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe.  Utilizing the Interactive Technology prepared maps, student will label accordingly. Technology and Resources – Interactive Technology, http://www.mapsofwar.com/images/Religion.swf http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html United Streaming (World Geography of South America) (Geography of the World: Europe…) Lesson Ideas  The students are given maps of specific continents and will locate the physical landforms on each map.  The students create fictitious maps using a minimum of 10 landforms. The students will present their information to the class.

"

Define and identify regions using human and physical characteristics.

10. Use coordinates of latitude and longitude to locate points on a world map.

GEO A 6.2

11. Explain the distribution patterns of economic activities and how changes in technology, transportation, communication and resources affect those patterns including: a. Agriculture; b. Mining; c. Fishing; d. Manufacturing.

GEO B 6.3

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

21st Century Skills - communication skills and information skills Lesson Ideas  The students will use latitude and longitude to locate landmarks, countries, and cities all over the world. Technology and Resources - http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html Lesson Ideas  The students will discuss the effects of both the United States economy and Mexico’s economy in relationship to the development of manufacturing. (Maquiladoras)  The students will discuss why early people settled along the Nile River in Egypt and how damming the river has affected the fertile soils of today.  The student’s research and complete “big maps” of Europe focusing on exportation of natural resources.

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

100

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Define and identify regions using human and physical characteristics. (cont.)

12. Identify and describe a variety of physical and human regions by analyzing maps, charts and graphs that show patterns of characteristics that define regions.

GEO B 6.4

Explain how the environment influences the way people live in different places and the consequences of modifying the environment.

13. Describe ways human settlements and activities are influenced by environmental factors and processes in different places and regions including: a. Bodies of water; b. Landforms; c. Climates; d. Vegetation; e. Weathering; f. Seismic activity.

GEO C 6.5

Technology and Resources - “Newsdepth” and Jr. Scholastic magazine

14. Describe ways in which human migration has an impact on the physical and human characteristics of places including: a. Urbanization; b. Desertification; c. Deforestation.

GEO C 6.6

Lesson Ideas  The students will choose one ancestor from each side of their family and interview them about their culture.

"

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas  Students compare and contrast the GDP, population, life expectancy, and literacy rate between major countries and the United States and make generalizations about the two. Technology and Resources – https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html

Technology and Resources – http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/habitat/index.asp 21st Century Skills – communication skills, and information skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

101

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how the environment influences the way people live in different places and the consequences of modifying the environment. (cont.)

Explain reasons that people, products and ideas move from place to place and the effects of that movement on geographic patterns.

"

ECONOMICS Explain how the endowment and development of productive resources affect economic decisions and global interactions.

INDICATOR 15. Describe ways humans depend on and modify the environment and the positive and negative consequences of the modifications including: a. Dam building; b. Energy production/usage; c. Agriculture; d. Urban growth. 16. Explain push and pull factors that cause people to migrate from place to place including: a. Oppression/Freedom b. Poverty/Economic opportunity; c. Cultural ties; d. Political conflicts; e. Environmental factors. 17. Identify and explain primary geographic causes for world trade including the uneven distribution of natural resources.

GEO C 6.7

18. Explain how the availability of productive resources and entrepreneurship affects the production of goods and services in different world regions.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas  Students view video of the building of Panama Canal and the positive impact it has had on the economy of Central America and the benefits to the world.  Students discuss China’s growing population and the stipulations the government has put on their society. Technology and Resources - video “The Building of the Panama Canal”, http://www.epa.gov/recyclecity/gameint.htm

GEO D 6.8

Lesson Ideas  Students choose one ancestor from each side of their family and interview them about their culture.

GEO D 6.9

Lesson Ideas  The students will look at resource maps and make inferences based on their observations.

E A 6.1

Lesson Ideas  Students will participate in the “Junior Achievement” program and view United Streaming: Understanding Economics. Technology and Resources - United Streaming: Understanding Economics, http://www.nationmaster.com/cat/eco-economy 21st Century Skills – Understanding US Economic Issues in Global Economy

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

102

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how the endowment and development of productive resources affect economic decisions and global interactions. (cont.) Explain why trade occurs and how historical patterns of trade have contributed to global interdependence.

"

"

Identify connections between government policies and the economy.

INDICATOR 19. Explain that most decisions involve tradeoffs and give examples.

E A 6.2

Lesson Ideas  Students will participate in the “Junior Achievement” program and view United Streaming: Understanding Economics. Technology and Resources - United Streaming Understanding Economics, http://www.nationmaster.com/cat/eco-economying Understanding Economics.

20. Explain why trade occurs when individuals, regions and countries specialize in what they can produce at the lowest opportunity cost and how this causes both production and consumption to increase. 21. Identify goods and services that are imported and exported and explain how this trade makes countries interdependent. 22. Describe how supply and demand helps to set the market-clearing price for goods and services and how prices reflect the relative scarcity of goods and services. 23. Distinguish between goods and services typically produced by the private sector and the public sector.

E B 6.3

21st Century Skills – Understanding US Economic Issues in Global Economy Lesson Ideas  Students will participate in the “Junior Achievement” program and view United Streaming: Understanding Economics. Technology and Resources - United Streaming: Understanding Economics, http://www.nationmaster.com/cat/eco-economy 21st Century Skills – Understanding US Economic Issues in Global Economy

E B 6.4

Lesson Ideas  Students will participate in the “Junior Achievement” program and view United Streaming: Understanding Economics. Technology and Resources - United Streaming: Understanding Economics

E B 6.5

21st Century Skills – Understanding US Economic Issues in Global Economy Lesson Ideas  Students will participate in the “Junior Achievement” program and view United Streaming: Understanding Economics. Technology and Resources - United Streaming: Understanding Economics 21st Century Skills – Understanding US Economic Issues in Global Economy

E C 6.6

Lesson Ideas  Students will participate in the “Junior Achievement” program and view United Streaming: Understanding Economics. Technology and Resources - United Streaming: Understanding Economics 21st Century Skills – Understanding US Economic Issues in Global Economy

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

103

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK GOVERNMENT Explain why people institute governments, how they influence governments, and how governments interact with each other.

"

"

Compare the defining characteristics of democracies, monarchies and dictatorships.

INDICATOR 24. Explain reasons for the creation of governments such as: a. Protecting lives, liberty and property; b. Providing services that individuals cannot provide for themselves. 25. Describe how the world is divided into countries that claim sovereignty over territory, and countries may be further divided into states or provinces that contain cities and towns. 26. Explain the ways that countries interact with each other including: a. Diplomacy; b. Treaties; c. International meetings and exchanges (e.g., United Nations); d. Military conflict. 27. Describe the defining characteristics of democracies, monarchies and dictatorships.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

GVT A 6.1

Lesson Ideas  The students will compare and contrast living in a democracy versus dictatorship.

GVT A 6.2

Lesson Ideas  The students will read and discuss European colonization of countries throughout the world.

GVT A 6.3

Lesson Ideas  The students will discuss how NAFTA has increased trade within North America and the impact it has had on the North American economy.

GVT C 6.4

Lesson Ideas  Given a list of characteristics, the student will determine the government.

Technology and Resources – http://www.mrnussbaum.com/countriescode2.htmworld

Technology and Resources – http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/government/index.htm

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

104

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Show the relationship 28. Explain how CRR between civic opportunities for citizens A participation and to participate in and 6.1 attainment of civic influence the political and public goals. process differ under various systems of government. Identify historical 29. Compare the rights CRR origins that influenced and responsibilities of B the rights U.S. citizens citizens living under 6.2 have today. various systems of government SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Analyze different 30. Use multiple sources SM perspectives on a to define essential A topic obtained from a vocabulary and obtain 6.1 variety of sources. information for a research project including: a. Almanacs; b. Gazetteers; c. Trade books; d. Periodicals; e. Video tapes; f. Electronic sources. Organize historical 31. Analyze information SM information in text or from primary and B graphic format and secondary sources in 6.2 analyze the order to summarize, information in order make generalizations and to draw conclusions. draw conclusions. " 32. Organize information SM using outlines and B graphic organizers. 6.3 Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Technology and Resources - Junior Scholastic magazine and “Newsdepth” video.

Lesson Ideas  Students will compare and contrast China’s government with the United States government.

Lesson Ideas  The students will use the internet and library as a resource for materials on various research projects including o The South American scrapbook, which includes labeling major landforms of a country, the culture of a country, weather of that particular country, landmarks of the country, and how that country got its independence. o Travel Europe fair which includes labeling major landforms of a country, holidays celebrated in that particular country, the religion of that country, the current government of that country, the language of that country, the currency of that country, major historical events of that country. Technology and Resources – Create a web page for each European country using the researched information. 21st Century Skills - communication and information skills Lesson Ideas  Students will choose one ancestor from each side of your family and interview them about their culture. Technology and Resources - http://www.nationmaster.com/statistics 21st Century Skills - communication and information skills Lesson Ideas  The students organize information with a variety of graphic organizers when presented with new material on different countries.

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

105

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 6 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK Organize historical information in text or graphic format and analyze the information in order to draw conclusions. (cont.) Present a position and support it with evidence and citation of sources. "

Work effectively in a group.

INDICATOR 33. Read and interpret pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs, circle graphs, tables and flow charts.

SM B 6.4

34. Complete a research project that includes a bibliography.

SM C 6.5

Lesson Ideas  Students will cite references for their Europe project using a bibliography.

35. Communicate a position on a topic orally or in writing and support the position with evidence.

SM C 6.6

Lesson Ideas  The students will complete a fictitious problem: the students research various problems happening today in the world. Each student’s develops a world problem within their country and writes how that problem will be solved with in their country.  The students will write to WVIZ on a topic presented in the “Newsdepth” video and their reaction to that particular news story.

36. Work effectively to achieve group goals: a. Engage in active listening; b. Provide feedback in a constructive manner; c. Help establish group goals; d. Take various roles within the group; e. Recognize contributions of others.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas  The students analyze at tables to compare economies between countries and make statements.  Students will read Junior Scholastic magazine human interest articles. Technology and Resources – http://www.nationmaster.com/statistics

SM D 6.7

21st Century Skills – critical thinking skills Lesson Ideas  Students will complete various group projects including Caravans, China Simulation, and Europe Fair (big maps). 21st Century Skills- collaboration skills, communication skills and information skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

106

GRADE 7

107

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Interpret relationships between events shown on multiple-tier time lines.

INDICATOR 1. Group events by broadly defined historical eras and enter onto multiple-tier time lines.

H A 7.1

Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, and Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator A  Create a timeline with a title and label the basic time period.  Label the major events and the years in which they occurred (ex. pyramids built).  Divide the timeline into different time periods for the same topic (ex. old kingdom, new kingdom).  Timelines may have many levels for different categories of events (ex. government, economics, inventions) and may assist in comparing different groups of people (ex. Egypt to Mesopotamia).  Assist students in understanding of the history of civilization in various parts of the world.  Use the timeline as a visual aid to help students to grasp the big picture of time and connections between civilizations in different parts of the world. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Visual learning and adaptability skills addressed through use of this timeline.  Critical thinking enhanced through the use of the timeline and discussion of connections and patterns of history.  Global awareness enhanced through the understanding of the history of civilization in various parts of the world. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Create a timeline at the start of the year.  Display in classroom and address it regularly when transitioning from one civilization to another. -Draw connections and point out overlaps between timelines for different groups.  Teacher-facilitated timeline explanation using the timeline as a visual aid to enhance communication, adaptability and visual learning skills.  Use when comparing different groups of people (ex. Egypt to Mesopotamia).  Use when transitioning between civilizations. (For example, point out that during the Golden Age of Greece, the Roman civilization was just being established) Enhancing an understanding of the history of globalization.  Use the timeline as a visual aid to help students to gain an understanding of the history of civilization in various parts of the world  Hang the timeline up in the room and keep it up for the remainder of the year. Refer back to it regularly, especially when transitioning between civilizations or historical eras. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Online Textbook at http://my.hrw.com

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

108

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR           

Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, Word, etc. https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons http://www.mrdowling.com http://www.ode.state.oh.us/GD/Templates/Pages/ODE/ODEPrimary.aspx?page=2&TopicRelationID=7 https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ode/ims/Default.asp?bhcp=1 http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=254&Itemid=120 http://www.ossrc.org/browse.php http://ehistory.osu.edu/world/TimeLineDisplay.cfm?Era_id=4 http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0001198.html Text, available workbooks, library books, pictures, modern-day objects, replicas of artifacts, giant, comprehensive Ancient History timeline for classroom.  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Mammouth Book of Whodunits” by Mike Ashley  *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Describe the political and social characteristics of early civilizations and their enduring impact on later civilizations.

2. Describe the enduring impact of early civilizations in India, China, Egypt, Greece and Rome after 1000 B.C. including: a. The development of concepts of government and citizenship; b. Scientific and cultural advancements; c. The spread of religions; d. Slavery and systems of labor.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

H B 7.2

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Individual or group exploration of the various events of the timeline. Exploration of the events can vary in depth depending on student ability. Recognition and discussion of the connections between civilizations and events may vary in depth and complexity depending on ability. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering Ancient Egypt, India, China, Greece, and Rome. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator B  When studying each civilization, explain how the people made a long-term impact on the world in the following categories: o Government (monarchy, democracy, feudalism). o Citizenship (rights and responsibilities). o Science (medicine, inventions, ideas). o Culture (art, architecture, daily life, etc.). o Religion (polytheistic, Hinduism). o Jobs/social classes/slavery. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Encourages creativity and innovation skills by recognizing the global benefit of historical contributions.  Global awareness enhanced by identifying the long-term impact of various innovations on the world.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) State Standards-Based

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

109

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 26th and 30th Dynasties”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  As each culture is addressed, point out major contributions and inventions that have impacted the world.  Draw connections between these contributions and the every-day lives of the students  Identify and discuss patterns of history and the impact of historic innovations on history.  ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 25th and 30th Dynasties” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Create models of various inventions or show modern-day examples of them.  Implement the use of various innovations from these societies throughout class activities.  Differentiated group work, presentations, individual exploration, and the use of student choice. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Online Textbook at http://my.hrw.com  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, Word, etc.  http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons  http://www.unitedstreaming.com  http://www.mrdowling.com  http://www.ode.state.oh.us/GD/Templates/Pages/ODE/ODEPrimary.aspx?page=2&TopicRelationID=7  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ode/ims/Default.asp?bhcp=1  http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=254&Itemid=120  http://www.ossrc.org/browse.php  Text, available workbooks, library books, pictures, modern-day objects, replicas of artifacts.  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 26th and 30th Dynasties”: o http://www.emuseum.mnsu.edu o http://www.metmuseum.org o http://www.livius.org o http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

110

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Describe the characteristics of feudal societies and the transition to the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe.

3. Describe the conditions that gave rise to feudalism, as well as political, economic and social characteristics of feudalism, in Asia and Europe.

H C 7.3

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated group work, presentations, individual exploration, and the use of student choice as class researches and explores various historical contributions and their impact on society. Products may range from pictures taken from magazines and websites, to detailed explanations of the depth of impact of various contributions on the world and directly on the lives of the students.  Differentiated Instructional Support taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 26th and 30th Dynasties”: o Utilize resources for the lesson at varying reading levels. o Allow students to use a variety of presentation modes such as drawing a pharaoh for visual/spatial learners, creating a skit or play for kinesthetic learners, developing a news report for verbal/linguistic learners, etc. o Challenge students to select additional topics for independent study or report and share with the class. o Have students work independently, in pairs or in heterogeneous groups to collect and display information on graphic organizers. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering European and Japanese Feudalism, Middle Ages, and the Renaissance/Reformation. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator C  When studying Feudalism describe: o What events and situations caused it to start? o The definition of this type of government. o The similarities and differences between Asian and European Feudalism o Different parts of Feudalism o Political (titles of leaders, who had what power) o Economic (did they trade? Were they self-sufficient?) o Social (social class structure) 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Knight or Samurai:

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

111

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Feudalism in Europe and Asia”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. o Identifying similarities and differences enhances students’ understanding of and ability to use knowledge. This process includes comparing, classifying, creating metaphors and creating analogies. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Teacher-facilitated group activity to incorporate collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills.  ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Knight or Samurai: Feudalism in Europe and Asia” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Online Textbook at http://my.hrw.com  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, Word, etc.  http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons  http://www.unitedstreaming.com  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  http://richgamer.com/game/4298-Feudalism  http://www.mrdowling.com  http://www.ode.state.oh.us/GD/Templates/Pages/ODE/ODEPrimary.aspx?page=2&TopicRelationID=7  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ode/ims/Default.asp?bhcp=1  http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=254&Itemid=120  http://www.ossrc.org/browse.php  Text, available workbooks, library books, pictures, modern-day objects, replicas of artifacts.  *Historical Fiction: o “Shogun” by James Clavell o “The Golden Sequence” by Martha E. Von Almedingen *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. * Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Knight or Samurai: Feudalism in Europe and Asia”: o Use heterogeneous grouping to link experts with novices. o For students who need assistance on the assessment, copy the matrix of class notes and highlight important information. o For students who require assistance with writing assignments, reduce the amount required, allow lists instead of Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

112

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

Describe the characteristics of feudal societies and the transition to the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe. (cont.)

INDICATOR

4. Explain the lasting effects of military conquests during the Middle Ages including: a. Muslim conquests; b. The Crusades; c. The Mongol invasions.

H C 7.4

paragraphs and substitute illustrations for writing. o In heterogeneous grouping, have experts function as peer teachers. o Challenge students to add a page to their book answering the question “Why did feudalism last longer in Japan?” Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while studying Ancient China (Mongols), Byzantium (Crusades), Islam/Arab (Muslim conquests), and Middle Ages (Crusades). Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator D  When studying the Middle Ages, explain the long-term impact of: o Muslim conquests o The Crusades o Mongol invasions 21st Century Skills to Address:  Information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades”: o Cooperative learning has a powerful effect on student learning. This includes:  Positive interdependence;  Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;  Group processing. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades” found at the following website: http://dnet01.ode.state.oh.us/ims.itemdetails/lessondetail.aspx?id=0907f84c805313db  Discuss the impact that the Muslim conquests had in the spread of Islam (for example, the Spanish Moors) and the present day evidence of the long-term cultural legacy.  Create comic strips of the major events of the Crusades.  Identify both the positive and negative ways the Mongols impacted those that they conquered. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  http://dnet01.ode.state.oh.us/ims.itemdetails/lessondetail.aspx?id=0907f84c805313db  http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons  http://www.unitedstreaming.com

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

113

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

 http://www.mrdowling.com  Text, available workbooks, library books, pictures, modern-day objects, replicas of artifacts.  Technology suggestions listed below were taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades”: o Use the Internet to supplement research materials. o Have students create a slide-show presentation showing the effects of the Crusades and post it on the school’s Web site.  *Historical Fiction: o “1066: The Year of the Conquest” by David Howarth o “The Earth is the Lord’s” by Taylor Caldwell o “The Black Rose” by Thomas Costain o “Blood Red Horse” by Kim Grant o “Alphabet of Dreams” by Susan Fletcher o “The Physician” by Noah Gordon o “The Three Students” by Haldene MacFall o “Knights of Arabia” by Marmaduke Picktall *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Describe the characteristics of feudal societies and the transition to the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe. (cont.)

5. Describe the impact of new ideas and institutions on European life including: a. The significance of printing with movable type; b. Major achievements in art, architecture and literature during the Renaissance; c. The Reformation.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

H C 7.5

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades: o Have students work individually, in pairs or in heterogeneous groups. o Provide resource materials on a wide range of reading levels. o Have students share research so that all students will have an opportunity to obtain the needed information. Provide copies of the research findings for students as needed. o Complete post-assessment responses orally, in writing or through the use of artwork. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering the Renaissance/Reformation. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator E  Describe the effect of European advancements including: o The importance of the printing press o Cultural advancements during the Renaissance (rebirth of art, etc.) o The Reformation (the change of the church) 21st Century Skills to Address:  Encourages creativity and innovation skills by recognizing the global benefit of historical contributions.  Global awareness enhanced by identifying the long-term impact of various innovations on the world.

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

114

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

 Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 25th and 30th Dynasties”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Explore the depth of the impact that the printing press has had on the world.  Draw connections between these contributions and the every-day lives of the students  Identify and discuss patterns of history and the impact of historic innovations on history  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 25th and 30th Dynasties” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Create models of various inventions or show modern-day examples of them.  Explore various facets of the Renaissance and Reformation, especially how this time period impacted the arts, the church, and exploration.  Differentiated group work, presentations, individual exploration, and the use of student choice. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Online Textbook at http://my.hrw.com  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, Word, etc.  http://drb.lifestreamcenter.net/Lessons  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  http://www.unitedstreaming.com  http://www.mrdowling.com  http://www.ode.state.oh.us/GD/Templates/Pages/ODE/ODEPrimary.aspx?page=2&TopicRelationID=7  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ode/ims/Default.asp?bhcp=1  http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=254&Itemid=120  http://www.ossrc.org/browse.php  Text, available workbooks, library books, pictures, modern-day objects, replicas of artifacts  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 25th and 30th Dynasties”: o http://www.emuseum.mnsu.edu o http://www.metmuseum.org o http://www.livius.org o http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk  *Historical Fiction: o “Private Renaissance” by Maria Bellonci o “Death of a Duchess” by Elizabeth Eyre o “The Agony and the Ecstasy” by Irving Stone Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

115

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

*Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students.

Describe the effects of interactions among civilizations during the 14th through the 18th centuries.

6. Describe the importance of the West African empires of Ghana, Mali and Songhay including: a. Trade routes; b. Products; c. The spread of the Arabic language; d. The spread of Islam.

H D 7.6

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated group work, presentations, individual exploration, and the use of student choice as class researches and explores the invention of the printing press and how this contribution impacted society. Products may range from pictures taken from magazines and websites, to detailed explanations of the depth of impact.  Differentiation ideas listed below was taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Renaissance in Ancient Egypt: the 25th and 30th Dynasties”: o Utilize resources for the lesson at varying reading levels. o Allow students to use a variety of presentation modes such as drawing a pharaoh for visual/spatial learners, creating a skit or play for kinesthetic learners, developing a news report for verbal/linguistic learners, etc. o Challenge students to select additional topics for independent study or report and share with the class. o Have students work independently, in pairs or in heterogeneous groups to collect and display information on graphic organizers. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering Ancient Africa, Islam/Arab and Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator F  Describe the importance of the Western African Empires (Ghana, Mali, and Songhay) including: o Trade (routes and products) o Cultural diffusion (Arabic language and Islam) 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. o Cooperative learning grouping has a powerful effect on student learning. This type of grouping includes the following elements:  Positive interdependence;  Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;  Group processing. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

116

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  http://www.wsu.edu  http://www.africa.upenn.edu/  Text, available workbooks, library books, pictures, modern-day objects, replicas of artifacts.  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires ”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. o Cooperative learning grouping has a powerful effect on student learning. This type of grouping includes the following elements:  Positive interdependence;  Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;  Group processing.  *Historical Fiction: o “A Bone from a Dry Sea” by Peter Dickenson *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Describe the effects of interactions among civilizations during the 14th through the 18th centuries. (cont.)

7. Describe the causes and effects of European exploration after 1400 including: a. Imperialism, colonialism and mercantilism; b. Impact on the peoples of sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

H D 7.7

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires”: o Have students work with a peer tutor, a written outline or visual aids. o Have students select an independent study project related to the West African empires and present findings to the class. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator when covering Ancient Africa and the Age of Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator G  When studying European Exploration after 1400 A.D. explain: o Causes (ex. Religious persecution, trade) o Effects (ex. Imperialism, colonialism, and mercantilism) o Impact on other peoples 21st Century Skills to Address:  Critical thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology during

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

117

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

active research.  Note taking skills utilized as research is recorded.  Individual writing and communication skills, as well as critical thinking and self-direction enhanced through position paper.  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, ICT literacy, and people skills addressed through group work and group presentation. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Implement the New York Times Learning Network Teacher Connections lesson on “Examining the Effects of Colonialism on Peoples Around the World” posted at the following website: http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/20030604wednesday.html?searchpv=learning_lessons  This lesson includes a group activity, research, note taking, an individual position paper, and a group presentation. *Note: This lesson plan is not a reviewed posting and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before being implemented in the classroom. * Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  http://www.ossrc.org/resource_detail.php?rec=2857  http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/20030604wednesday.html?searchpv=learning_lessons  The following websites are the direct resources listed in the New York Times Learning Network Teacher Connections lesson on “Examining the Effects of Colonialism on Peoples Around the World”: o http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/1503 o http://www.historyofindia.com/ o http://www.investindia.com/newsite/index.htm  *Historical Fiction: o “A Bone from a Dry Sea” by Peter Dickenson *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. * Opportunities for Differentiation:  The following potential activities are taken directly from the New York Times Learning Network Teacher Connections lesson on “Examining the Effects of Colonialism on Peoples Around the World”: o Students will take part in a variety of activities and complete assignments that address multiple intelligences such as: journal responses, thoughtful participation in class discussions, thorough research in groups and accurate notes, and thoughtful completion of position papers based in fact. o Create a timeline illustrating the independence of a country in your assigned area of the world. When was independence granted? What was happening in this country at the time? What was happening in the imperialist Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

118

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

o o o o o PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Compare cultural 8. Analyze the practices, products and relationships among perspectives of past cultural practices, civilizations in order to products and understand perspectives of early commonality and civilizations. diversity of cultures.

PS A 7.1

country at this time? What people or organizations were involved in the imperialist movement? What attempts were made at independence, and how successful were these? Write a report about a famous explorer, such as Christopher Columbus, Vasco de Gama, Marco Polo, Francisco Pizarro, or Zheng He. What did they do? What impact did their travels have on the peoples with whom they interacted? Create a poster highlighting the history and culture of Portugal, including language, music, dance, religion, etc. Create a photo journal illustrating the effects of colonialism in your homeland's society. Find examples in street names, family names, historic sites, clothing, food and religion. Create a map of colonial India. Which countries had colonies in India? When were they occupied? How long did each occupation last? Read the "Poisonwood Bible" by Barbara Kingsolver or "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe and write a brief report explaining the effects of colonialism on an African nation.

Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator H  Compare and contrast the different civilizations studied including their: o Cultures o Trade o Points of view 21st Century Skills to Address:  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills address through group activity.  Critical thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology.  Global awareness and media literacy skills will be enhanced as students recognize and explore connections between civilizations of the past with current events, and especially, their daily lives. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Throughout the year, continually draw attention to connections and similarities between various civilizations studies.  Additionally, point out connections to the lives of the students as often as possible. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Online Textbook: http://my.hrw.com  *Historical Fiction:

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

119

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Compare cultural practices, products and perspectives of past civilizations in order to understand commonality and diversity of cultures. (cont.)

9. Explain how the Silk Road trade and the Crusades affected the cultures of the people involved.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS A 7.2

Opportunities for Differentiation:  When making connections and recognizing similarities between civilizations of the past and cultures of the present, the depth of student exploration and teacher expectation may vary based on individual student abilities.  The teacher is encouraged to pose questions of varying levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy when facilitating discussion of the connections between civilizations studied and present-day cultures. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering Ancient China and the Middle Ages. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator I  Explain how the cultures involved were impacted by: o The Silk Road trade o The Crusades 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades”: o Cooperative learning has a powerful effect on student learning. This includes:  Positive interdependence;  Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

120

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

 Group processing.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road”: o Nonlinguistic representations help students think about and recall knowledge. o Creating graphic organizers; o Making physical models; o Generating mental pictures; o Drawing pictures and pictographs; o Engaging in kinesthetic activity. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology suggestions listed below were taken directly from the ODE State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades”: o Use the Internet to supplement research materials. o Have students create a slide-show presentation showing the effects of the Crusades and post it on the school’s Web site.  Technology resources and activities listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road”: o During the Day One sights and sounds activity, images of the Silk Road can be displayed from an electronic encyclopedia or an online encyclopedia. Infohio.org provides access to an online encyclopedia for use by Ohio schools. These images can be shown via the computer or printed on overhead transparencies. If proper supplies or technology are not available, this activity can be done using images in student textbooks or on posters. o Have students use word processing software to type and print paragraphs for the post-assessment activity. o Supplement classroom resources with Internet access for student research. o Access further information and lesson ideas on the Silk Road from the following Web sites: http://www.silkroadproject.org : http://www.askasia.org  *Historical Fiction: o “1066: The Year of the Conquest” by David Howarth o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “Warden of the Smoke and Bells” by Richard Llewellyn o “The Chinese Gold Murders” by Robert Van Gulik Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

121

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

o “Heike Story” by Yoshinkawa Eiji o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Explain how contact between different cultures impacts the diffusion of belief systems, art, science, technology, language and forms of government.

10. Give examples of contacts among different cultures that led to the changes in belief systems, art, science, technology, language or systems of government.

PS C 7.3

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades: o Have students work individually, in pairs or in heterogeneous groups. o Provide resource materials on a wide range of reading levels. o Have students share research so that all students will have an opportunity to obtain the needed information. Provide copies of the research findings for students as needed. o Complete post-assessment responses orally, in writing or through the use of artwork.  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road”: o Assign pairs of students to research a city. Provide students with a variety of resources at varying ability levels including pictures, print, Internet access and video. o Allow student to share their information using a variety of presentation modes including oral, visual, tactile, etc. o Challenge students to complete an independent study in which they research how trade on the Silk Road affected a culture of interest and share information learned with the class. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator J  Cultural Diffusion  Explain how contact between different civilizations led to changes in: o Religion o Art o Science o Technology o Language o Government 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the important aspects of what they are learning.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

122

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR o o o o o o

Nonlinguistic representations help students think about and recall knowledge. This includes the following: Creating graphic representations (organizers); Making physical models; Generating mental pictures; Drawing pictures and pictographs; Engaging in kinesthetic activity.

Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China”: o Have students use the Internet to access information about the research topics. o Have students use word processing and slid show software to prepare and share presentations.  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

123

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

Explain how contact between different cultures impacts the diffusion of belief systems, art, science, technology, language and forms of government. (cont.)

INDICATOR

11. Describe the cultural and scientific legacies of African, Greek, Roman, Chinese, Arab and European civilizations.

PS C 7.4

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China”: o Have students work in heterogeneous groups to conduct research and presentation activities. o Have students use graphic organizers to take notes during research and to prepare for presentation to the class. o Allow students to choose the presentation style of interest including visual, oral, kinesthetic, drama, etc. o Challenge students to further research or complete an independent study on a specific scientific or cultural legacy of China or Africa based on their interests. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering Ancient China, Greece, Rome, Africa, Islam/Arab, Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator K  For each civilization studied, describe their cultural (art, architecture) and scientific (medicine, astronomy) contributions to the world. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Timeless Treasures”: o Cooperative learning groups have a powerful effect on student learning. This type of grouping includes the following elements:  Positive interdependence;  Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;  Group processing.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China ”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the important aspects of what they are learning. o Nonlinguistic representations help students think about and recall knowledge. This includes the following:  Creating graphic representations (organizers);  Making physical models;  Generating mental pictures;  Drawing pictures and pictographs;  Engaging in kinesthetic activity. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Timeless Treasures” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

124

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Timeless Treasures”: o Have students visit online museums. o Have students take digital pictures of things at home or in the community to use in their slides. o Have students use presentation software to create slides for the post-assessment.  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China”: o Have students use the Internet to access information about the research topics. o Have students use word processing and slide show software to prepare and share presentations.  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis o “A Bone from a Dry Sea” by Peter Dickenson *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. * Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Timeless Treasures”: o Have students work independently, in pairs or in heterogeneous groups for research activity and slide presentation. o Provide students pictures of objects that we use every day and have them make connections to early civilizations. Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

125

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR o o

Adjust scoring guides to place more emphasis on illustrations or written descriptions depending on student needs. Challenge students to further research a person, place, event or invention from an ancient civilization of their interest and share with the class.  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Legacies of Africa and China”: o Have students work in heterogeneous groups to conduct research and presentation activities. o Have students use graphic organizers to take notes during research and to prepare for presentation to the class. o Allow students to choose the presentation style of interest including visual, oral, kinesthetic, drama, etc. o Challenge students to further research or complete an independent study on a specific scientific or cultural legacy of China or Africa based on their interests. GEOGRAPHY Identify on a map the location of major physical and human features of each continent.

12. For each of the societies studied, identify the location of significant physical and human characteristics on a map of the relevant region.

GEO A 7.1

Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator L  For each civilization, identify major features on a map including: o Physical features o Human features (man made). 21st Century Skills to Address:  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills address through group activity.  Critical thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology.  Skills Support listed below was taken from the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries”: o Inferential, analytical and critical thinking skills enhanced. o Map skills enhanced. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Implement the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries” found at the following site: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/03/g68/assessbound.html *This lesson is also aligned with National Geography Standards! *Note: This lesson plan is not a reviewed posting and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before being implemented in the classroom. * Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

126

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

 http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/03/g68/assessbound.html  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries”: o http://www.askasia.org/ o http://mapmachine.nationalgeographic.com o http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/atlas/?Parent=asia&Mode=d&SubMode=w

Identify on a map the location of major physical and human features of each continent. (cont.)

13. On a map, identify places related to the historical events being studied and explain their significance.

GEO A 7.2

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries”: o Have students choose a modern Asian country and determine the different kingdoms and/or empires that have controlled its area in the past. (Be sure to include areas in Central Asia such as Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.) o Have students consider: What difference might that history make to the people in these areas today? What are the various historic experiences that citizens can draw on as they celebrate their past? Which of the epics or kingdoms have they chosen to celebrate and why? Which aspects of their history do they seem to have decided to forget? Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator M  On a map for each civilization, identify places where main events happened and explain why the location is significant. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Creativity and Innovation skills enhanced.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage”: o Nonlinguistic representations, including drawing pictures and pictographs, help students think about and recall knowledge. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage”: o Internet access can be used to conduct research. o Word processing or publishing software can be used in the creation of picture books.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

127

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

Define and identify regions using human and physical characteristics.

INDICATOR

14. Describe changes in the physical and human characteristics of regions that occur over time and identify the consequences of such changes.

GEO B 7.3

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage”: o Allow students to work independently, in pairs or heterogeneous groups to complete the pre-assessment outline map. o Provide a variety of resources including pictures, print, internet and video for students to research places along Mansa Musa’s journey. o Challenge students to report on the salt and gold trade. Instruct students to include a map of trade routes. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator N  Describe short and long-term changes in the environment and how they impacted the people of that area. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills address through group activity.  Critical thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology.  Skills Support listed below was taken from the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries”: o Inferential, analytical and critical thinking skills enhanced. o Map skills enhanced. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Implement the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries” found at the following site: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/03/g68/assessbound.html *This lesson is also aligned with National Geography Standards. *Note: This lesson plan is not a reviewed posting and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before being implemented in the classroom. * Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries”: o http://www.askasia.org/ o http://mapmachine.nationalgeographic.com o http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/atlas/?Parent=asia&Mode=d&SubMode=w

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

128

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

Explain how the environment influences the way people live in different places and the consequences of modifying the environment.

INDICATOR

15. Use physical and historical maps to analyze the reasons that human features are located in particular places.

GEO C 7.4

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the National Geographic Expeditions Lesson Plan entitled “Assessing Political Boundaries”: o Have students choose a modern Asian country and determine the different kingdoms and/or empires that have controlled its area in the past. (Be sure to include areas in Central Asia such as Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.) o Have students consider: What difference might that history make to the people in these areas today? What are the various historic experiences that citizens can draw on as they celebrate their past? Which of the epics or kingdoms have they chosen to celebrate and why? Which aspects of their history do they seem to have decided to forget? Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator O  Use physical and historical maps to explain why human (man made) features were built in certain places. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Location, Location, Location”: o Inquiry-based learning helps students become resourceful, effective investigators and problem solvers. o Research reports that with effective teacher facilitation, student-centered inquiry projects can reverse patterns of underachievement. o Inquiry-based projects can build learning communities that foster communication skills, interpretive abilities and an understanding of issues from a variety of perspectives. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Location, Location, Location” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology suggestion listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Location, Location, Location”: o Have students use Web sites with Geographic Information Systems technology to create maps that show the locations of particular physical and human features. Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Location,

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

129

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

Explain reasons that people, products and ideas move from place to place and the effects of that movement on geographic patterns.

INDICATOR

16. Describe the geographic factors and processes that contribute to and impede the diffusion of people, products and ideas from place to place including: a. Physical features; b. Culture; c. War; d. Trade; e. Technological innovations.

GEO D 7.5

Location, Location”: o Have students work independently, in pairs or cooperative groups. o Encourage the use of a variety of resources including print, video, internet, interview, etc. o Challenge students to create charts and graphs comparing the location of human features, physical features and population. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator P  Describe the geographic features of the area being studied.  Explain how these features effected the following: o Cultural diffusion (the spread of art, religion, inventions, etc.) o War o Trade (products and routes) o Technological advancements 21st Century Skills to Address:  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills address through group activity.  Critical thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology.  Global awareness and media literacy skills will be enhanced as students recognize and explore connections between civilizations of the past with current events, and especially, their daily lives. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Throughout the year, continually draw attention to connections and similarities between various civilizations studies.  Additionally, point out connections to the lives of the students as often as possible.  Examples should cover a variety of topics showing the many ways that cultural diffusion can occur.  Examples should cover a variety of topics showing the many ways that cultural diffusion can impact the lives of people involved.  The teacher is encouraged to address both the short-term and long-term impact of cultural diffusion. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Online Textbook: http://my.hrw.com Opportunities for Differentiation:  When making connections and recognizing similarities between civilizations of the past and cultures of the present, the

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

130

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

depth of student exploration and teacher expectation may vary based on individual student abilities.  The teacher is encouraged to pose questions of varying levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy when facilitating discussion of the connections between civilizations studied and present-day cultures.  Examples should cover a variety of topics in an effort to address varying student interests. ECONOMICS Explain how the endowment and development of productive resources affect economic decisions and global interactions.

17. Compare the endowment of productive resources in world regions and explain how this endowment contributed to specialization, trade and interdependence in ancient times.

E A 7.1

Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered: Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator Q  Give examples of the resources found in the area of study.  Explain how these resources contributed to: o Specialization (making a specific product) o Trade o Interdependence (depending on other people to get what they need/want)  Compare this information to other civilizations. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Survive Or Not”: o Nonlinguistic representations help students think about and recall knowledge. This includes the following:  Creating graphic organizers;  Making physical models;  Generating mental pictures;  Drawing pictures and pictographs;  Engaging in kinesthetic activity. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Survive Or Not” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Online Textbook at http://my.hrw.com  Technology suggestions listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Survive Or Not”: o Have students visit online museum displays to see the archaeological evidence of trade in ancient times. o Use Internet connections to contact anthropologists or archaeologists with any questions that arise about the availability or use of productive resources in ancient times.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

131

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

Explain why trade occurs and how historical patterns of trade have contributed to global interdependence.

INDICATOR

18. Describe the growth of cities and the establishment of trade routes in Asia, Africa and Europe; the products and inventions that traveled along these routes (e.g., spices, textiles, paper, precious metals and new crops); and the role of merchants.

E B 7.2

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Survive Or Not”: o Group students carefully to provide support for students struggling with vocabulary or concepts. Allow students to work together on worksheets, monitoring progress to be sure that all students in the group are involved in the discussion and research project. o Provide a variety of materials for groups to construct multiple models of trade goods for their fictional society. o Assign roles for groups during the trade simulation activity to ensure that all students are involved. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering Ancient Mesopotamia, China, Greece, Rome, Africa, Middle Ages, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator R  When studying Asia, Africa, and Europe, describe the following: o Trade routes o City growth along these routes o The products and inventions that spread o And the role of merchants. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road”: o Nonlinguistic representations help students think about and recall knowledge. o Creating graphic organizers; o Making physical models; o Generating mental pictures; o Drawing pictures and pictographs; o Engaging in kinesthetic activity. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road”: o During the Day One sights and sounds activity, images of the Silk Road can be displayed from an electronic

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

132

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

encyclopedia or an online encyclopedia. Infohio.org provides access to an online encyclopedia for use by Ohio schools. These images can be shown via the computer or printed on overhead transparencies. If proper supplies or technology are not available, this activity can be done using images in student textbooks or on posters. o Have students use word processing software to type and print paragraphs for the post-assessment activity. o Supplement classroom resources with Internet access for student research. o Access further information and lesson ideas on the Silk Road from the following Web sites: http://www.silkroadproject.org : http://www.askasia.org  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. * Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Effects of the Silk Road”: o Assign pairs of students to research a city. Provide students with a variety of resources at varying ability levels including pictures, print, Internet access and video. o Allow students to share their information using a variety of presentation modes including oral, visual, tactile, etc. o Challenge students to complete an independent study in which they research how trade on the Silk Road affected a culture of interest and share information learned with the class.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

133

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK GOVERNMENT Compare the defining characteristics of democracies, monarchies and dictatorships.

INDICATOR 19. Compare direct and representative democracy using examples of ancient Athens, the Roman republic and the United States today.

GVT C 7.1

Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering Ancient Greece and Rome. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator S  When studying Ancient Greece and Rome, compare and contrast the two types of democracy: o Direct democracy o Representative democracy.  Compare these to the United States government (representative democracy). 21st Century Skills to Address:  Global awareness enhanced through the recognition of the impact of early democracies on democratic governments throughout the world today.  Communication and information and civic literacy skills enhanced through a written position paper on public policy.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic”: o Nonlinguistic representations or graphic organizers help students think about and recall knowledge. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology suggestions listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic”: o Have students use software to create a flow chart showing the structure of each government and its relationship to its citizens. o Visit government Web sites. o Library specialist can aid classroom teacher in selecting history books and online resources.  *Historical Fiction: o “Nobody’s Princess” by Esther M. Friesner o “Troy” by Adele Geras o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Roman Nights” by Ron Burns

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

134

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

o “The Robe” by Lloyd Douglas o “Locadio’s Apprentice” by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Search the Seven Hills” by Barbara Hambly o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis o “The Etruscans” by Mika Waltari *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Compare the defining characteristics of democracies, monarchies and dictatorships. (cont.)

20. Describe the essential characteristics of the systems of government found in city-states, kingdoms and empires from ancient times through the Middle Ages

GVT C 7.2

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic”: o Group students heterogeneously to allow for student interaction with peers. o Have students create illustrations defining each of the vocabulary words. o Have students research the voting regulations and processes in each of the governments studied. Students should prepare a presentation to share this information with the class. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator T  Describe the following types of government: o City-states o Kingdoms o Empires 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the Discovery Education lesson plan entitled “Rome’s Rise to Power: The Republic”: o Research and note taking allow cultivation of information skills and personal productivity and responsibility. o Writing comparison-contrast piece of writing, especially with the use of a word processor will enhance critical thinking skills and should improve information and communications technology literacy. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Implement the Discovery Education lesson plan entitled “Rome’s Rise to Power: The Republic” found at the following website: http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/risetopower/index.html *Note: This lesson plan is not a reviewed posting and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before being implemented in the classroom. *

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

135

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology suggestions listed below were taken directly from the Discovery Education lesson plan entitled “Rome’s Rise to Power: The Republic”: o http://www.carlos.emory.edu/ o http://www.larth.it/index_eng.htm o http://atschool.eduweb.co.uk/nettsch/time/romans.html  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. * Opportunities for Differentiation:  Offer a Venn Diagram as an alternative to the writing assignment.  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the Discovery Education lesson plan entitled “Rome’s Rise to Power: The Republic”: o Choice of two approached to the writing process. o Extend the assignment by asking students to comment on how both the Roman system in the period under examination and the current U.S. system differ from what Plato had in mind for a government when he wrote The Republic. If you haven’t already, you may want to show at this point the documentary Plato’s Republic, available from our School Store. Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

136

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

 A Touch of Livy - Give students an appreciation of the history of history by reading to them selected paragraphs about this period of Roman history written by Livy in his History of Rome a few centuries later.  The Census - During this period, Rome classified its citizens on the basis of the census. Discuss with students what the uses of a U.S. census are in the 21st century. How are people classified, and why? Credit to: Christine LaPlaca Burrows, former high school history teacher and current freelance educator. CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Show the relationship 21. Explain how the CRR between civic participation of citizens A participation and differs under monarchy, 7.1 attainment of civic and direct democracy and public goals. representative democracy.

Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered. (Ancient Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, and Feudalism (Japanese and European). Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator U  Explain how life is different for citizens (their involvement in the government) under the following types of government: o Monarchy o Direct democracy o Representative democracy 21st Century Skills to Address:  Civil Literacy enhanced through the identification of the roles of citizens under various types of government.  Students may be encouraged to become civically engaged.  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills address through group activity.  Critical thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the use of technology. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  As various types of government are discussed multiple facets of the systems should be addressed.  The rights, roles and responsibilities of citizens under various types of government should be discussed when studying each type of government.  Additionally, similarities and differences should be addressed and frequently be referred to as different types of governments are covered.  Graphic organizers are strongly encouraged. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  The Academic Youth Policy Forum addresses “Creating Academically Proficient and Civically Engaged StudentsThrough the No Child Left behind Act (Part 2)” at the following address: http://www.aypf.org/forumbriefs/2004/fb022004.htm  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

137

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Identify historical origins that influenced the rights U.S. citizens have today.

22. Describe the rights found in the Magna Carta and show connections to rights Americans have today.

CRR B 7.2

Opportunities for Differentiation:  The use of graphic organizers is strongly encouraged for students with special needs.  Take the lesson a step further by creating, allowing opportunities for students to explore and evaluate their own rights, roles, and responsibilities as citizens/members of our society. Encourage students to take on a positive and more active role in society and to be civically engaged. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator while covering the Middle Ages and the Age of Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator V  When studying the Magna Carta (a government document from the Middle Ages in Europe): o Describe the rights it gives to the people involved. o Point out similarities in rights Americans have today. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Creativity, innovation, problem solving, and critical thinking skills enhanced with the use of the suggestion for differentiation listed below.  Skills Support listed below was taken from the History Works Lesson Plan entitled “Comparing the Founding Documents”: o Group work promotes collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills. o Written paper promotes critical thinking, information and communications technology literacy enhanced through the writing process and the use of technology. o Creation of a matrix enhances visual/special skills and critical thinking skills.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

138

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Implement the History Works Lesson Plan entitled “Comparing the Founding Documents” found at the following website: http://www.historyworksohio.org/classroom/plan.cfm?id=10 *Note: This lesson plan is not a reviewed posting and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before being implemented in the classroom. * Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology resource listed below was taken directly from the History Works Lesson Plan entitled “Comparing the Founding Documents”: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/index.html Opportunities for Differentiation:  As an extension, students may be challenged with creating a document granting rights to members of a hypothetical society. SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Organize historical 23. Describe historical information in text or events and issues from graphic format and the perspectives of analyze the information people living at the time in order to draw in order to avoid conclusions. evaluating the past in terms of today’s norms and values.

SM B 7.1

Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered. (Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator W  When studying a civilization, look at main things that happen from the point of view of people living during that time period. (Keep in mind that in our culture today, we might look at those same things in a different way.) 21st Century Skills to Address:  Global awareness enhanced through the recognition of the impact of early democracies on democratic governments throughout the world today.  Communication and information and civic literacy skills enhanced through a written position paper on public policy.  Creativity and Innovation skills enhanced.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic”: o Nonlinguistic representations or graphic organizers help students think about and recall knowledge.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage”: o Nonlinguistic representations, including drawing pictures and pictographs, help students think about and recall knowledge.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires”:

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

139

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR o o

Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. Cooperative learning grouping has a powerful effect on student learning. This type of grouping includes the following elements:  Positive interdependence;  Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;  Group processing.

Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology suggestions listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic”: o Have students use software to create a flow chart showing the structure of each government and its relationship to its citizens. o Visit government Web sites. o Library specialist can aid classroom teacher in selecting history books and online resources.  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage”: o Internet access can be used to conduct research. o Word processing or publishing software can be used in the creation of picture books.  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. o Cooperative learning grouping has a powerful effect on student learning. This type of grouping includes the following elements:  Positive interdependence; Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

140

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

 Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;  Group processing.  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. * Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “To Be or Not to Be Democratic”: o Group students heterogeneously to allow for student interaction with peers. o Have students create illustrations defining each of the vocabulary words. o Have students research the voting regulations and processes in each of the governments studied. Students should prepare a presentation to share this information with the class.  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Mansa Musa’s Pilgrimage”: o Allow students to work independently, in pairs or heterogeneous groups to complete the pre-assessment outline map. o Provide a variety of resources including pictures, print, internet and video for students to research places along Mansa Musa’s journey. o Challenge students to report on the salt and gold trade. Instruct students to include a map of trade routes.  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “A Golden Age: Three West African Empires”: Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

141

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR o o

Present a position and support it with evidence and citation of sources.

24. Compare multiple viewpoints and frames of reference related to important events in world history.

SM C 7.2

Have students work with a peer tutor, a written outline or visual aids. Have students select an independent study project related to the West African empires and present findings to the class. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered. (Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator X  Compare the points of view of various groups of people within the same civilization (ex. different social classes) that may have different opinions than the other groups. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades”: o Cooperative learning has a powerful effect on student learning. This includes:  Positive interdependence;  Face-to-face promotive interaction;  Individual and group accountability;  Interpersonal and small group skills;  Group processing. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades”: o Use the Internet to supplement research materials. o Have students create a slide-show presentation showing the effects of the Crusades and post it on the school’s Web site.  *Historical Fiction: o “The Eight” by Katherina Neville o “Timeline” by Michael Creighton o “The Egyptian Cinderella” by Shirley Climo o “Mara, Daughter of the Nile” by Eloise McGraw

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

142

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

o *Show the documentary “Nefertiti Resurrected” o “The Dragon of the Ishtar Gate” by L. Sprague DeCamp o “Gilgamesh, King of Urk” by Thomas Mielke o *Show the Movie “Little Buddha” o “Winter Cherry” by Kenneth Westmacott Lin o “The Samurai: A Novel” by Julia Kristeva o “Tiger, Tiger” by Lynne Reid Banks o “The King Must Die” by Mary Renault o “The Children’s Homer” by Patrick Colum o “The Greek News” by Anton Powell o “Spartacus” by Howard Fast o “Silver Pigs” by Lundsey Davis *Note: The historical fiction resources are not reviewed postings and therefore must be reviewed and determined appropriate by individual educators before recommending them to students. *

Work effectively in a group.

25. Establish guidelines, rules and time lines for group work.

SM D 7.3

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Group activity  Student choice of product  Differentiated Instructional Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “East Meets West: Effects of the Crusades”: o Have students work individually, in pairs or in heterogeneous groups. o Provide resource materials on a wide range of reading levels. o Have students share research so that all students will have an opportunity to obtain the needed information. Provide copies of the research findings for students as needed. o Complete post-assessment responses orally, in writing or through the use of artwork Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered. (Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator Y  Help to write guidelines, rules, and time lines for working in groups in class throughout the year. (i.e. help from every group member, fair amounts of time needed, group goals, staying on topic, etc.) 21st Century Skills to Address:  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills address through group activity.  Critical thinking, information and communications and personal responsibility will accompany the implementation of the rules within the groups.  Self-awareness, civil responsibility and critical thinking skills will b enhanced as students reflect on group and individual performance.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

143

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  Although the teacher may suggest rules that may be effective, students are to establish the guidelines and rules that they will be responsible for following during group activity. The creating of these rules may be done as a whole group intended to be used and followed throughout the year or reevaluated and rewritten in individual groups during various activities.  Use a poster to display the rules if they are to be followed consistently throughout the year.  Be sure to allow students to collaborate and determine their own rules in a democratic fashion so as to encourage ownership and self-directed behaviors. Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  http://www.jhu.edu/virtlab/misc/Group_Rules.htm

Work effectively in a group. (cont.)

26. Reflect on the performance of a classroom group in which one has participated including the contribution of each member in reaching group goals.

SM D 7.4

Opportunities for Differentiation:  The groups that students work with, implement rules with and reflect on will vary greatly throughout the school year. Groups may be heterogeneous, homogeneous, based on ability, based on interest, and randomly assigned at times.  Some students may need assistance creating and implementing group rules. The class may want to develop their own consistent rules, continuously rewrite rules with new groups, or take teacher suggestions for rules that may be most effective. Civilizations Covered:  Address this indicator for all civilizations and major eras covered. (Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Africa, Islam/Arab, Feudalism (Japanese and European), Middle Ages, Renaissance/Reformation, Exploration/Expansion. Explanation of Indicator: Revised Indicator Z  After working in a group, look back and describe: o Your personal contribution o The contribution of each of the other members of the group o The success of reaching group goals. 21st Century Skills to Address:  Collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem solving, leadership, and people skills address through group activity.  Critical thinking, information and communications and personal responsibility will accompany the implementation of the rules within the groups.  Self-awareness, civil responsibility and critical thinking skills will b enhanced as students reflect on group and individual performance.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Effects of the Silk Road”: o Nonlinguistic representations help students think about and recall knowledge. They include the following:

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

144

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

 Creating graphic organizers;  Making physical models;  Generating mental pictures;  Drawing pictures and pictographs;  Engaging in kinesthetic activity.  Skills Support listed below was taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Knight or Samurai: Feudalism in Europe and Asia”: o Summarizing and note taking are two of the most powerful skills to help students identify and understand the most important aspects of what they are learning. o Identifying similarities and differences enhances students’ understanding of and ability to use knowledge. This process includes comparing, classifying, creating metaphors and creating analogies. Methods/Suggestions for Implementation:  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Effects of the Silk Road” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Knight or Samurai: Feudalism in Europe and Asia” found at the following website: https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp Technology-Based Resources and Other Resources:  Interactive Technology, Internet, Power Point, etc.  http://www.ode.state.oh.us  https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Search/GSASearchResults.asp  Group Reflection Questionnaire  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Effects of the Silk Road”: o During the Day One sights and sounds activity, images of the Silk Road can be displayed from an electronic encyclopedia or an online encyclopedia. Infohio.org provides access to an online encyclopedia for use by Ohio schools. These images can be shown via the computer or printed on overhead transparencies. If proper supplies or technology are not available, this activity can be done using images in student textbooks or on posters. o Have students use word processing software to type and print paragraphs for the post-assessment activity. o Supplement classroom resources with Internet access for student research.  Access further information and lesson ideas on the Silk Road from the following Web sites: o http://www.silkroadproject.org o http://www.askasia.org  Technology resources listed below were taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Knight or Samurai: Feudalism in Europe and Asia”: o Utilize computers with Internet access to supplement classroom resources. o Have students produce picture books using word processing or publishing software.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

145

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 7 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Opportunities for Differentiation:  Differentiated Instructional Support taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “The Effects of the Silk Road”: o Assign pairs of students to research a city. Provide students with a variety of resources at varying ability levels including pictures, print, Internet access and video. o Allow students to share their information using a variety of presentation modes including oral, visual, tactile, etc. o Challenge students to complete an independent study in which they research how trade on the Silk Road affected a culture of interest and share information learned with the class.  Differentiated Instructional Support taken directly from the State Standards-Based Lesson Plan “Knight or Samurai: Feudalism in Europe and Asia”: o Use heterogeneous grouping to link experts with novices. o For students who need assistance on the assessment, copy the matrix of class notes and highlight important information. o For students who require assistance with writing assignments, reduce the amount required, allow lists instead of paragraphs and substitute illustrations for writing. o In heterogeneous grouping, have experts function as peer teachers. o Challenge students to add a page to their book answering the question “Why did feudalism last longer in Japan?”

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

146

GRADE 8

147

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Interpret relationships between events shown on multiple-tier time lines. Describe the effects of interactions among civilizations during the 14th through the 18th centuries.

INDICATOR 1. Select events and construct a multiple-tier time line to show relationships among events.

H A 8.1

2. Describe the political, religious and economic aspects of North American colonization including: a. Reasons for colonization, including religion, desire for land and economic opportunity; b. Key differences among the Spanish, French and British colonies; c. Interactions between American Indians and European settlers, including agricultural and cultural exchanges, alliances and conflicts; d. Indentured servitude and the introduction and institutionalization of slavery; e. Early representative governments and democratic practices that emerged, including town meetings and colonial assemblies; f. Conflicts among colonial powers for control of North America.

H D 8.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will construct a multi-tier timeline (using technology) of the events leading up to the Revolutionary War. Through class discussion, students will orally state relationships among these events. Technology and Resources: http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/materials/timeline/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and Problem Solving skills, Information Literacy

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research the 13 colonies using a teacher prepared information chart (colony, founder, year founded, purpose, economy, religion, government, labor system and agricultural and geographic features). Students will use library resources and Internet sites.  Students will write an essay on the impact of colonization on the Native Americans.  Students will draw the route of the triangular trade and write an essay on the positive and negative effects of the Columbian Exchange.  Students will analyze primary sources in order to understand colonial slavery and indentured servitude. Technology and Resources: http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/learning_history/servitude_slavery/ss_servitude.cfm PowerPoint Presentation on Colonial Government PowerPoint Presentation: History of the Slave Trade Article: Rivalry Between France and England in the New World; students will read and orally discuss. United Streaming Video: http://www.unitedstreaming.com Dark Passages (Segment: Beginning of Slave trade), websites listed in Resources Fiction: The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare, The Deerslayer by James Fenimore Cooper, Cast 2 Shadows by Ann Rinaldi 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Information Literacy

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

148

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the causes and consequences of the American Revolution, with emphasis on both Colonial and British perspectives.

"

INDICATOR 3. Identify and explain the sources of conflict which led to the American Revolution, with emphasis on the perspectives of the Patriots, Loyalists, neutral colonists and the British concerning: a. The Proclamation of 1763, the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, the Tea Act and the Intolerable Acts; b. The Boston Tea Party, the boycotts, the Sons of Liberty and petitions and appeals to Parliament. 4. Explain the results of important developments of the American Revolution including: a. A declaration of American independence; b. Character and significance of the military struggle in the North in the early years of the war and the shift of the battle to the South after 1779; c. Creation of state constitutions; d. Impacts on women, African-Americans and American Indians.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H E 8.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will take on the role of a newspaper reporter for the Boston Gazette. They will write 2 articles about the Boston Massacre; one that is written from the point of view of a Patriot and one from the point of view of a Loyalist.  Students will identify the causes of the American Revolution and identify corresponding effects using a Cause/Effect Diagram.  Students will draw political cartoons illustrating their point of view regarding events leading to the American Revolution. Technology and Resources: Info Ohio Library: Video: Taxation without Representation, United Streaming: Countdown to Independence: Cause of the American Revolution, Video Series: The American Revolution Fiction: Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

H E 8.4

Lesson Ideas:  Students will read the Declaration of Independence in small groups and identify the grievances listed.  Students will complete chart: Strengths and Weaknesses of Military Forces: United States and Britain; follow up questions: According to your chart, who should have won the Revolutionary War? Why? Why do you think the Revolutionary War was won by the colonists?  Students will work in small groups and create a classroom constitution.  Discussion of states’ constitutions and how it affected African Americans, Native Americans and Women’s rights. Technology and Resources: Copy of Declaration of Independence and United Streaming: Declaration of Independence: The Foundation of Ideas for a New Age Video Series: The American Revolution Fiction: The American Revolutionaries: A History in Their Own Words by Milton Meltzer 21st Century Skills: Creativity and Innovation Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Leadership and Responsibility, Communication and Collaboration Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

149

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Explain the political and economic challenges faced by the United States after the Revolutionary War and the actions that resulted in the adoption of the U.S. Constitution.

5. Explain major domestic problems faced by the leaders of the new republic under the Articles of Confederation including: a. Maintaining national security; b. Creating a stable economic system; c. Dealing with war debts; d. Collecting revenue; e. Defining the authority of the central government.

H F 8.5

"

6. Explain the challenges in writing and ratifying the U.S. Constitution including: a. Issues debated during the convention resulting in compromises (i.e., the Great Compromise, the Three-Fifths Compromise and the compromise over the slave trade); b. The Federalist/AntiFederalist debate; c. The debate over a Bill of Rights.

H F 8.6

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a two-column chart and list the powers granted to each government; Powers of the Confederation Government and Powers of the Constitutional Government.  Students will identify from this chart the problems facing the nation under the Articles of Confederation.  Students will participate in a simulation game illustrating the problems that caused the failure of the Articles of Confederation. See website listed. Technology and Resources: http://www.col-ed.org/cur/sst/sst192.txt 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare/contrast the New Jersey and Virginia Plan. They will take on the role of a supporter of one of these plans and engage in a class debate.  Students will create a newsletter from the viewpoint of a Federalist or Anti-Federalist.  Students will analyze the Bill of Rights and each amendment. They will choose 2 or 3 amendments and write an editorial about the importance of including a Bill of Rights in the Constitution. Technology and Resources: United Streaming: Liberty’s Kids: “We the People” United Streaming: American History: Foundation of American Government 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Communication and Collaboration Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

150

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Explain the political and economic challenges faced by the United States after the Revolutionary War and the actions that resulted in the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. (cont.)

7. Describe the actions taken to build one country from 13 states including: a. The precedents established by George Washington, including the cabinet and a twoterm presidency; b. Alexander Hamilton’s actions to create a financially strong country, including the creation of a national bank; c. The establishment of an independent federal court system.

H F 8.7

Analyze the causes and consequences of the American Civil War.

8. Describe and analyze the territorial expansion of the United States including: a. Northwest Ordinance; b. The Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition; c. Westward movement including Manifest Destiny; d. The Texas War for Independence and the Mexican-American War.

H G 8.8

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Before and Beyond the Constitution: What Should a President Do? Students will gather a list of accomplishments of George Washington in his tenure as the first president of the United States from the textbook and other sources.  Students will examine Article III of the Constitution and discuss its powers.  Students will watch a featured segment of video: Alexander Hamilton American Experience (PBS). Students will answer questions related to video. Technology and Resources: http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=458 http://www.congresslink.org/print_basics_histmats_constitution_art3.htm http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/hamilton/tguide/index.html http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/hamilton/tguide/index.html

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a four-page pamphlet advertising these movements and its impact on U.S. Expansion. Technology and Resources: United Streaming: America Under Thomas Jefferson: The Louisiana Purchase and Lewis and Clark (See Teacher’s Guide and Blackline Masters) United Streaming: Westward Expansion: The Pioneer Challenge Video: American Westward Expansion Fiction: Streams to the River, River to the Sea by Scott O’Dell, This Vast Land by Stephen E. Ambrose, The Prairie by James Fenimore Cooper, The Ox-Bow Incident by Walter Van Tilburg Clark 21st Century Skills: Creativity and Innovation Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

151

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze the causes and consequences of the American Civil War. (cont.)

INDICATOR 9. Explain causes of the Civil War with emphasis on: a. Slavery; b. States’ rights; c. The different economies of the North and South; d. The extension of slavery into the territories, including the Dred Scott Decision and the Kansas-Nebraska Act; e. The abolitionist movement and the roles of Frederick Douglass and John Brown; f. The addition of new states to the Union and their impact on the balance of power in the Senate, including the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850; g. The emergence of Abraham Lincoln as a national figure in the Lincoln-Douglas debates, the presidential election of 1860, and the South’s secession.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H G 8.9

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete chart on factors that divided the North and the South. (Factors: Slavery, Economy, Abolitionist Movement).  Students will analysis Primary Documents: Ripley Anti-Slavery Minutes and engage in discussion questions. http://www.historyworksohio.org/classroom/activity.cfm?id=1  Students will read Road to Freedom; Historical Background and discuss the subject of slavery from the perspective of the Republican and Democratic Parties - http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=864 (see classroom resources; Road to Freedom). Technology and Resources: http://www.historyworksohio.org/classroom/activity.cfm?id=1 United Streaming: American Civil War, The Causes of the War and Civil War: Conflict between the North and the South, The Monroe Doctrine and the Missouri Compromise (search title and get Teacher’s Guide and Blackline Masters) Video: Civil War Fiction: The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Shades of Gray by Carolyn Reeder 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

152

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze the causes and consequences of the American Civil War. (cont.)

"

INDICATOR 10. Explain the course and consequences of the Civil War with emphasis on: a. Contributions of key individuals, including Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant; b. The Emancipation Proclamation; c. The Battle of Gettysburg. 11. Analyze the consequences of Reconstruction with emphasis on: a. President Lincoln’s assassination and the ensuing struggle for control of Reconstruction, including the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson; b. Attempts to protect the rights of and enhance opportunities for the freedmen, including the basic provisions of the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution; c. The Ku Klux Klan and the enactment of black codes.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H G 8.10

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a timeline of the significant battles of the Civil War.  Students will complete the Contribution Chart of significant individuals during the Civil War.  Students will study the Emancipation Proclamation and summarize in an essay its impact and effects.  Students will research a battle from the prospective of a journalist. They will write a five-paragraph report using Microsoft Publisher. Technology and Resources: United Streaming: Life and Times of Abraham Lincoln (Teacher’s Guide and Blackline Masters) and Civil War http://www.sdst.org/shs/library/civilwarwq.html Fiction: Come Juneteenth by Ann Rinaldi, Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt, Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane

H G 8.11

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Information Literacy. Initiative and Self-Direction Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a Graphic Organizer on Congress and Reconstruction.  Students will analyze newspaper cartoons of the KKK. They will examine two illustration and answer guided questions.  Students will view PowerPoint presentation on the Reconstruction Period.  Students will create an advertisement for either the 13th, 14th or 15th Amendment. Technology and Resources: Graphic Organizer, newspaper cartoons, http://www.historicaldocuments.com/KuKluxKlanHistory,htm Fiction: Up From Slavery by Booker Washington, Sounder by William Armstrong 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Skills, Information Literacy, Social and Cross-Cultural Skills, Creativity and Innovation Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

153

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Analyze examples of 12. Trace the development interactions between of religious diversity in the cultural groups and colonies, and analyze how explain the factors the concept of religious that contribute to freedom has evolved in the cooperation and United States. conflict.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

PS B 8.1

Lesson Idea:  Students will read from text information on the 3 major regions: New England, Middle and Southern. They will create charts comparing and contrasting the diversity of religion in these regions.  In small groups, students will research a significant person who demonstrated religious diversity and present their research to the class. http://www.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/allam/16071783/religion.htm  Students will read a primary source; “Religion As Cause of Revolution” and complete the visual organizer (SOAP – Subject, Objective, Audience, Perspective) http://maass.nyu.edu/resources/r1/lesson_plans/religion.html Technology and Resources: Library sources, Internet research, website above

"

"

13. Describe and explain the social, economic and political effects of: a. Stereotyping and prejudice; b. Racism and discrimination; c. Institutionalized racism and institutionalized discrimination.

14. Analyze how contact between white settlers and American Indians resulted in treaties, land acquisition and Indian removal.

PS B 8.2

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills Lesson Ideas:  Understanding Stereotypes and Prejudice Lesson, http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/stereotypes/  Students will analyze the Brown v. Board of Education Court Case and discuss its impact on racism.  Lesson Title: Understanding Stereotypes – http://school.discovery.com/lessonplans/programs/stereotypes  Have Minorities Gained Acceptance,  http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Social_Studies/US_History/USH0011.html Technology and Resources: United Streaming: Civil Rights: The Long Road to Equality and Freedom: A History of US Democracy And Struggles Fiction: New Boy by Julian Houston, Face Relations: 11 Stories About Seeing Beyond Color by Marilyn Singer, Native Son by Richard Wright, Freedom’s Children: Young Civil Rights Activists Tell Their Own Stories by Ellen Levine

PS B 8.3

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Communication and Collaboration Skills, Social and Cross-Cultural Skills, Flexibility and Adaptability, Initiative and Self-Direction Lesson Ideas:  Students will assess treaties and land acquisition through oral discussion and its impact on Native Americans.  Students will read article Collision Over Land. They will role play territorial invasion and problem solve to resolve conflict. Technology and Resources: Article Collision Over Land United Streaming: Native America: Removal Video; Teacher’s Guide and Blackline Masters and American Values in Conflict 21st Century Skills: Communication and collaboration Skills, Creativity and Innovation Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

154

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR 15. Analyze the economic, geographic, religious and political factors that contributed to: a. The enslavement of Africans in North America; b. Resistance to slavery.

PS B 8.4

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16. Describe the historical limitations on participation of women in U.S. society and their efforts to gain equal rights.

PS B 8.5

Explain how contact between different cultures impacts the diffusion of belief systems, art, science, technology, language and forms of government.

17. Explain how the diverse peoples of the United States developed a common national identity.

PS C 8.6

18. Compare places and regions in the United States, as they existed prior to 1877 with the same places and regions today to analyze changes in land use and population, political, social and economic characteristics.

GEO B 8.1

Analyze examples of interactions between cultural groups and explain the factors that contribute to cooperation and conflict. (cont.)

GEOGRAPHY Define and identify regions using human and physical characteristics.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Idea:  Through oral discussion, students will compare slavery in the 13 colonies and identify factors that led to slavery.  Students will read about Stono Rebellion and discuss slave resistance. Technology and Resources: American Slavery: The Southern Plantation Way of Life (see Teacher’s Guide and Blackline Masters) Fiction: Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe 21st Century Skills: Communication and Collaboration Lesson Idea:  Students will select a significant woman from the 1700-1900’s and present an oral report on their contribution in obtaining equality for women. Technology and Resources: Website: http://library.thinkquest.org/3776/Social%20Studies%20Category.html Fiction: Uncommon Faith by Trudy B. Krisher, 33 Things Every Girls Should Know about Women’s History: From Suffragettes to Skirt Lengths to the Era by Tonya Bolden 21st Century Skills: Communication and Collaboration, Information Literacy, Productivity and Accountability Lesson Idea:  Students will design an advertising brochure encouraging Europeans to come to their English Colony. Through oral discussion, students will evaluate the impact of diverse cultures and its role in nationalism.  Students will read articles in newspaper about immigration and discuss answers to teacher directed questions.  Students will research the background of their ancestors and write a summary Technology and Resources: Library books, Internet, United Streaming Video: American Diversity, http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Social_Studies/US_History/USH0008.html Fiction: The Escape from Home by Avi; So Far from Home: The Diary of Mary Driscoll by Barry Denenberg 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Creativity and Innovation Skills, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills Lesson Idea:  Students will compare historical maps from various time periods and assess changes in population, political, social and economic characteristics. Through oral discuss, students will evaluate reasons for the changes.  Students will identify a region by defining its distinguishing characteristics using maps and other resources; explain how and why regions change; describe the relationships and interactions among regions; and analyze the influences and effects of regional labels and images (for example, the Sun Belt states attract tourists, retirees, and new businesses). Technology and Resources: Maps (textbook) and Jr. Scholastic www.onlineatlas.us www.mapsofworld.com/usa/thematic-maps/usa-population-map.html 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

155

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how the environment influences the way people live in different places and the consequences of modifying the environment. Explain reasons that people, products and ideas move from place to place and the effects of that movement on geographic patterns. ECONOMICS Explain how the endowment and development of productive resources affect economic decisions and global interactions. Explain why trade occurs and how historical patterns of trade have contributed to global interdependence. "

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

19. Analyze how physical characteristics of the environment influenced population distribution, settlement patterns and economic activities in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries. 20. Explain how colonization, westward expansion, immigration and advances in transportation and communication changed geographic patterns in the United States.

GEO C 8.2

21. Explain how the uneven distribution of productive resources influenced historic events such as the Civil War.

E A 8.1

22. Discuss how mercantilism and the establishment of colonies led to increased global trading during the 17th and 18th centuries. 23. Explain the purpose and effects of trade barriers such as tariffs enacted before the Civil War.

E B 8.2

Lesson Idea:  Students will analyze physical maps and through oral discussion explain how environment influences population density. Technology and Resources: Physical and Population Maps www.mapsofworld.com/usa/thematic-maps/usa-population-map.html 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Communication and Collaboration Skills

GEO D 8.3

Lesson Idea:  After viewing videos, students will articulate changes in geographic patterns as a result of movement. Technology and Resources: United Streaming: Westward Expansion (Activities: Anticipation Guide and Cloze Evaluation) Immigration to the United States 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Communication and Collaboration Skills

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a web (graphic organizer) illustrating the productive resources of the North and South. Using this information, students will articulate the reasons for the uneven distribution and its effects. 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Communication and Collaboration

E B 8.3

Lesson Idea:  Students will create a concept map showing the impact of Mercantilism. Technology and Resources: The Impact of the Global Economy (Holt Video DVD Series), http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/score_lessons/market_to_market/pages/activities.html 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking, Information Literacy Lesson Ideas:  Limiting Trade Lesson http://ecedweb.unomaha.edu/lessons/feoga.htm  Students will read Primary Source: President Jackson’s Proclamation Regarding Nullification and answer respective questions related to document. Technology and Resources: http://ecedweb.unomaha.edu/lessons/feoga.htm 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Communication and Collaboration Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

156

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify connections between government policies and the economy.

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GOVERNMENT Explain why people institute governments, how they influence governments, and how governments interact with each other.

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INDICATOR 24. Explain how lack of power to regulate the economy contributed to the demise of the Articles of Confederation and the creation of U.S. Constitution. 25. Explain how governmental protection of property rights and regulation of economic activity impacted the development of the U.S. economy.

E C 8.4

26. Analyze the principles of self-government and natural rights expressed in the Declaration of Independence and their relationship to Enlightenment ideas.

GVT A 8.1

27. Explain how political parties developed as a result of attempts to resolve issues in the early years of the United States including: a. Payment of debt; b. Establishment of a national bank; c. Strict or loose interpretation of the Constitution; d. Support for England or France.

GVT A 8.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Idea:  Students will create a strengths/weaknesses chart on the Article of Confederation. Using information from this chart, students will articulate the reasons for the failure of the Articles of Confederation. Technology and Resources: United Streaming Video: Are We To Be A Nation? 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration

E C 8.5

Lesson Idea:  Students will do a critical analysis of the Bill of Rights  Lesson: How has the Constitution shaped the economic system in the United States? http://ecedweb.unomaha.edu/lessons/fecg1.htm Technology and Resources: http://ecedweb.unomaha.edu/lessons/fecg1.htm 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will identify the natural rights listed in the Declaration of Independence.  Activity: A Declaration of Our Rights: Students will work in small groups and write a list of their “unalienable rights” and responsibilities they have to protect these rights.  Students will read about Enlightenment figures (John Locke) and how their philosophies impacted the idea of selfgovernment. Technology and Resources: United Streaming Video: The American Revolution: From Colonies to the Constitution, Shaping the New Nation (See Teacher’s Guide and Blackline Masters) 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Flexibility and Adaptability, Initiative and Self-Direction Lesson Idea:  Students will create a compare/contrast diagram of the Democratic-Republican views of Thomas Jefferson to the Federalist views of Alexander Hamilton.  Students will take the position of a Federalist or Anti-Federalist and write a newspaper editorial from their point of view.  Students will participate in the activity Home-Made Political Parties; http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/Social_Studies/US_Government/GOV0014.html Technology and Resources: United Streaming Video: An American Nation Begins: 1789-1792 (See Teacher’s Guide and Blackline Masters) 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Creativity Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

157

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Explain how the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, and the Northwest Ordinance have provided for the protection of rights and the long-term future of a growing democracy.

28. Explain how events and issues demonstrated the need for a stronger form of governance in the early years of the United States: a. Shays’s Rebellion; b. Economic instability; c. Government under the Articles of Confederation.

GVT B 8.3

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29. Explain the political concepts expressed in the U.S. Constitution: a. Representative democracy; b. Federalism; c. Bicameralism; d. Separation of powers; e. Checks and balances.

GVT B 8.4

30. Explain how the U.S. Constitution protects the rights of citizens, regulates the use of territory, manages conflict and establishes order and security.

GVT B 8.5

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Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas  Students will create a Cause/Effect Chart on Shay’s Rebellion and the economic instability of the country.  Students will create strengths/weaknesses charts on the Articles of Confederation and make recommendations to the 2nd Continental Congress for improvements. 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a flowchart identifying the system of checks and balances between the Executive, Legislative and Judicial Branches.  Students will write an essay explaining representation in the Senate and House of Representatives. Technology and Resources: United Streaming: Understanding the Constitution: Creating the Federal Government 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration

Lesson Idea:  In-depth study of the Constitution; Bill of Rights, Articles 1-7 and Amendments 11-27.  Students will read various situations and analyze practical applications of a law as described in the Constitution. Technology and Resources: Washington Courts (http://www.courts/wa/gov) Search for Judges in the Classroom: No Vehicles in the Park Lesson 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Information Literacy, Leadership and Responsibility

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

158

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Explain how the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, and the Northwest Ordinance have provided for the protection of rights and the long-term future of a growing democracy. (cont.)

31. Explain how specific provisions of the United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, limit the powers of government in order to protect the rights of individuals with emphasis on: a. Freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition; b. Right to trial by jury and the right to counsel; c. Due process and equal protection of the laws.

GVT B 8.6

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32. Explain how the Northwest Ordinance established principles and procedures for the orderly expansion of the United States.

GVT B 8.7

Lesson Ideas:  In-depth study of the Constitution; Bill of Rights, Articles 1-7 and Amendments 11-27  Students will write a classroom Bill of Rights.  Students will analysis significant Supreme Court Cases such as Tinker v. Des Moines  Students will read Rights in Conflict Case Studies in small group. They will identify which rights are in conflict in the situation and decide as a group how to solve the conflict.  Guest Speaker: Local Lawyer will discuss and role-play with students a Supreme Court Case on freedom of speech. Technology and Resources: Rights in Conflict Case Studies, Washington Courts (http://www.courts/wa/gov) search for Judges in the Classroom Lesson: Rights in Conflict; United Streaming – American Values in Conflict 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Leadership and Responsibility, Flexibility and Adaptability, Initiative and Self-Direction

Lesson Ideas:  Students will view the primary source document Ordinance of the Northwest Territory (1787). Students will use the document to understand how the land was to be governed and specific laws regarding rights of peoples, including Native Americans. Student will complete Primary Source Analysis. Technology and Resources: http://historyworks.ohio.org/classroom/plan-moesc.cfm?id-20 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and problem Solving Skills; Communication and Collaboration

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33. Describe the process by which a bill becomes a law.

GVT B 8.8

Lesson Idea:  Students will draw a flowchart illustrating the process of how a bill becomes a law.  Students will research a current bill and in Congress and follow its process, http://www.gpoaccess.gov/bills/index.html Technology and Resources: http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/articles/government/howabillbecomesalaw.htm http://bensguide.gpo.gov/6-8/lawmaking/index.html http://www.gpoaccess.gov/bills/index.html 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

159

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Show the relationship 34. Show the relationship CRR between civic between participating in A participation and civic and political life and 8.1 attainment of civic the attainment of and public goals. individual and public goals including: a. The Sons of Liberty and Committees of Correspondence/ American independence; b. The Underground Railroad and the abolitionist movement/Abolition of slavery.

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35. Explain how the opportunities for civic participation expanded during the first half of the 19th century including: a. Nominating conventions; b. Expansion of the franchise; c. Active campaigning.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

CRR A 8.2

Lesson Idea:  Students will take on the role of a famous political leader or a presenter. The presenter will write a speech to be given at a testimonial about this famous person. The famous person will write an acceptance speech. Technology and Resources: http://www.milforded.org/schools/calfpen/jcox/wq/revwar.html 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Leadership and Responsibility, Flexibility and Adaptability, Initiative and Self-Direction

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a flow chart that shows the process for electing a U.S. President from the primary elections through inauguration day.  Students will design and illustrate a political cartoon that shows the candidate campaigning. Technology and Resources: http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/content/3775 http://people.howstuffworks.com/political-convention.htm 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

160

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify historical origins that influenced the rights U.S. citizens have today.

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INDICATOR 36. Evaluate the role of historical figures and political bodies in furthering and restricting the rights of individuals including: a. Jefferson and the contradiction between the ideals of the Declaration of Independence and his role as a slave owner; b. State constitutional conventions and the disenfranchisement of free blacks; c. Jackson and his role in Indian removal; d. Frederick Douglass and the abolitionist movement; e. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and women’s rights.

CRR B 8.3

37. Show connections between the rights and responsibilities of citizenship including: a. Voting and staying informed on issues; b. Being tried by a jury and serving on juries; c. Having rights and respecting the rights of others.

CRR B 8.4

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will write a newspaper editorial convincing readers to abolish slavery.  Students will read primary source - Indian Removal and answer responsive questions to article.  Students will read information on ownership of slaves by major figures (Jefferson, Lincoln, Washington, etc) and analyze their views. http://www.nas.com/~lopresti/ps.htm  Students will create a set of biographical trading cards (8) on historical figures and their impact on furthering the rights of individuals. Technology and Resources: http://www.nas.com/~lopresti/ps.htm http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/printlessons.cgi/Virtual/Lessons/Social_Studies/US_History/USH0046.html 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills, Information Literacy

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a poster advertising the rights and responsibilities of a United States citizen.  Students will investigate an issue, form an opinion and present their views in a class wide caucus. Technology and Resources: Civic Books http://bensguide.gpo.gov/6-8/citizenship/responsibilities.html http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/citizenship/rights.html 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Information Literacy, Creativity and Innovation Skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

161

SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 8 INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Analyze different 38. Compare accuracy and perspectives on a point of view of fiction topic obtained from a and nonfiction sources variety of sources. about a particular era or event.

Present a position and support it with evidence and citation of sources.

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Work effectively in a group.

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39. Construct a historical narrative using primary and secondary sources.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

SM A 8.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will read a fictional article and a primary source article on the Boston Massacre. They will summarize the event according to the point of view of the article. Technology and Resources: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb3033/is_200411/ai_n20344247

SM C 8.2

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Information Literacy, Lesson Ideas:  Students will take on the role of a famous political leader or a presenter. The presenter will write a speech to be given at a testimonial about this famous person. The famous person will write an acceptance speech. Technology and Resources: Internet (research) http://www.lib.washington.edu/subject/History/RUSA/

40. Write a position paper or give an oral presentation that includes citation of sources.

41. Organize and lead a discussion.

42. Identify ways to manage conflict within a group.

SM C 8.3

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Information Literacy, Creativity and Innovation Skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will prepare and deliver a 2 minute-persuasive speech on a topic or issue of their choice. Technology and Resources: Library and Internet resources

SM D 8.4

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Information Literacy, Creativity and Innovation Skills Lesson Ideas:  During group work, each student will be given the opportunity to be the leader of the group and be responsible for leading the discussion.

SM D 8.5

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills, Leadership and Responsibility, Productivity and Accountability Lesson Ideas:  In small groups, students will be presented with scenarios and they will brainstorm ways to resolve conflicts within a group. Technology and Resources: http://disputeresolution.ohio.gov/schools/contentpages/styles.htm 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. Communication and Collaboration, Creativity and Innovation Skills, Productivity and Accountability

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

162

WORLD HISTORY

163

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Explain connections between the ideas of the Enlightenment and changes in the relationships between citizens and their governments. "

Explain the social, political and economic effects of industrialization.

INDICATOR 1. Explain how Enlightenment ideas produced enduring effects on political, economic and cultural institutions, including challenges to religious authority, monarchy and absolutism.

2. Explain connections among Enlightenment ideas, the American Revolution, the French Revolution and Latin American wars for independence.

3. Explain the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution with emphasis on: a. How scientific and technological changes promoted industrialization in the textile industry in England; b. The impact of the growth of population, rural-to-urban migrations, growth of industrial cities, and emigration out of Europe; c. The changing role of labor and the rise of the union movement; d. Changes in living and working conditions for the early industrial working class, especially women and children; e. The growth of industrialization around the world.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

H A 9.1

Lesson Ideas:  Have the students create a list of the enlightened thinkers and philosophies. Have them research how those thoughts have changed and impacted politics, economics and cultural institutions today.  Students will utilize the internet to find historical examples of challenges enlighten thinkers made to authority, monarchies and absolutism. Technology/Resources - http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761571679/Enlightenment_Age_of.html

H A 9.2

21st Century Skills: critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Students will take the enlightened ideas and find the connections/strands of each revolution. Students will create a chart showing the traits of each revolution.  Using the internet, students will create a chart looking at modern conflicts and how the enlightenment philosophies fit in. Technology/Resources - http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761571679/Enlightenment_Age_of.html

H B 9.3

21st Century Skills: critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Students will be divided into groups with each one being assigned a specific aspect of the industrial revolution. Students must explain the cause and effect. Groups will present this information via power point or Interactive Technology. Technology/Resources - http://www.runet.edu/~wkovarik/envhist/4industrial.html 21st Century Skills: teamwork

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

164

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze the reasons that countries gained control of territory through imperialism and the impact on people living in the territory that was controlled. "

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Connect developments related to World War I with the onset of World War II.

INDICATOR 4. Describe the political, economic and social roots of imperialism.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

H C 9.4

Lesson Ideas:  The student will define imperialism, give historical examples of imperialism, and select a modern day country or region that they would practice imperialism, and explain why using outside research done on the internet. Technology/Resources - http://www.michaelparenti.org/Imperialism101.html 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

5. Analyze the perspectives of the colonizers and the colonized concerning: a. Indigenous language; b. Natural resources; c. Labor; d. Political systems; e. Religion. 6. Explain the global impact of imperialism including: a. Modernization of Japan; b. Political and social reform in China; c. Exploitation of African resources. 7. Analyze causes and effects of World War I with emphasis on: a. Militarism, imperialism, nationalism and alliances; b. The global scope, outcomes and human costs of the war; c. The role of new technologies and practices including the use of poison gas, trench warfare, machine guns, airplanes, submarines and tanks; d. The Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

H C 9.5

Lesson Ideas:  Divide students will be divided into 2 groups (colonizers and colonized) and explain how each of the issues (indigenous language; natural resources, labor, political systems, religion) affected their group and how they would deal with them. Technology/Resources - http://www.michaelparenti.org/Imperialism101.html 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

H C 9.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a list of conditions that were present in those areas to encourage imperialism. They will also create a list of how these areas are faring today and the effect of imperialism. Student will discuss potential solutions. Technology/Resources - http://www.michaelparenti.org/Imperialism101.html

H D 9.7

21st Century Skills: critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze timelines leading up to the war. Student will analyze maps of Europe before and after the war.  Students will write a research paper on topic of choice on WWI (3 pages with at least two internet sources).  Students will analyze charts/graphs showing economic and human costs of the war. Technology/Resources - http://www.firstworldwar.com/ 21st Century Skills: organization

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

165

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Connect developments related to World War I with the onset of World War II. (cont.)

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Analyze connections between World War II, the Cold War and contemporary conflicts.

INDICATOR 8. Analyze the causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution including: a. The lack of economic, political and social reforms under the tsars; b. The impact of World War I; c. The emergence of Lenin, Stalin and the Bolsheviks; d. The rise of communism in Russia. 9. Assess the global impact of post-World War I economic, social and political turmoil including: a. Disarmament; b. Worldwide depression; c. Colonial rebellion; d. Rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Europe and Asia. 10. Analyze the causes of World War II including: a. Appeasement; b. Axis expansion; c. The role of the Allies. 11. Analyze the consequences of World War II including: a. Atomic weapons; b. Civilian and military losses; c. The Holocaust and its impact; d. Refugees and poverty; e. The United Nations; f. The establishment of the state of Israel.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

H D 9.8

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a list of conditions that contributed to the Russian Revolution, compare these factors with current Russia. Compare and contrast Lenin with Stalin (role play each in class).  Student will create a chart, describing communism in Russia and why it is successful.  Predict the Future: Students will write a prediction of where communism will be 20 years from now and why, based on what is going on in the world today. Technology/Resources - http://www.firstworldwar.com/ 21st Century Skills: organization/creativity

H D 9.9

Lesson Ideas:  Divide the class into 3 groups assigning each one with economic, social, and political turmoil. Students will discuss role that they played in leading up to WWII. Technology/Resources - http://www.firstworldwar.com/ 21st Century Skills: organization

H D 9.10

Lesson Ideas:  Students will assume the role of the allies and explain why they selected their course of action and then explain to their classmates what they would have done based on the facts. Students will also provide examples of today where appeasement is being practiced and why it is being allowed. Technology/Resources - http://www.firstworldwar.com/

H E 9.11

21st Century Skills: organization Lesson Ideas:  Students will take each one of the consequence and rank them according what they feel has had the most impact on the world to the least and site examples to support their argument (use internet for this information). Students will then change a consequence, based on current information. Technology/Resources - http://www.firstworldwar.com/ 21st Century Skills: organization

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

166

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze connections between World War II, the Cold War and contemporary conflicts. (cont.)

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INDICATOR 12. Analyze the impact of conflicting political and economic ideologies after World War II that resulted in the Cold War including: a. Soviet expansion in Eastern Europe; b. The division of Germany; c. The emergence of NATO and the Warsaw Pact; d. The Chinese Communist Revolution. 13. Examine social, economic and political struggles resulting from colonialism and imperialism including: a. Independence movements in India, Indochina and Africa; b. Rise of dictatorships in former colonies. 14. Explain the causes and consequences of the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War including: a. The arms build-up; b. Ethnic unrest in the Soviet Union; c. Independence movements in former Soviet satellites; d. Global decline of communism. 15. Examine regional and ethnic conflict in the post-Cold War era including: a. Persistent conflict in the Middle East; b. Ethnic strife in Europe, Africa and Asia.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

H E 9.12

Lesson Ideas:  Students will each be assigned a region of the world and analyze the developments in that region, past to present. Students will also discuss whether any of these situations could have been avoided and how things would have changed, based on this course of action. Technology/Resources - http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/timeline/ww2time.htm 21st Century Skills: academic

H E 9.13

Lesson Ideas:  Students will identify on a map, the areas of the world with dramatic population increases and GDP. They will discus these current social and political issues. Technology/Resources - http://www.neravt.com/left/hotspots/global.html 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

H E 9.14

Lesson Ideas:  Student will create a timeline of the Cold War, analyze charts and graphs, and create a chart where the students list all of the pros/cons of the Cold War. The class will discuss where communism is today and where it is going in the future. Technology/Resources - http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/coldwar.htm 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

H E 9.15

Lesson Ideas:  Each student will be assigned a region of the world and required to create a newspaper of that area highlighting the events that have transpired since the Cold War using the internet or publication master. Technology/Resources - http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/coldwar.htm 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

167

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Analyze the influence 16. Analyze examples of how of different cultural people in different cultures view perspectives on the events from different actions of groups. perspectives including: a. Creation of the state of Israel; b. Partition of India and Pakistan; c. Reunification of Germany; d. End of apartheid in South Africa. Analyze the consequences of oppression, discrimination and conflict between cultures.

Analyze the ways that contacts between people of different cultures result in exchanges of cultural practices.

PS A 9.1

Lesson Ideas:  Each student will be assigned a different country or region of the world. They will complete a written report explaining how that country or region’s culture views events including the creation of the state of Israel, partition of India and Pakistan, reunified Germany, end of apartheid in South Africa. Technology/Resources - http://www.neravt.com/left/hotspots/global.html 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

17. Analyze the results of political, economic, and social oppression and the violation of human rights including: a. The exploitation of indigenous peoples; b. The Holocaust and other acts of genocide, including those that have occurred in Armenia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Iraq.

PS B 9.2

18. Explain how advances in communication and transportation have impacted: a. Globalization; b. Cooperation and conflict; c. The environment; d. Collective security; e. Popular culture; f. Political systems; g. Religion.

PS C 9.3

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

Lesson Ideas:  Students will watch videos about each of the conflicts. They will compare and contrast conditions. They also need to come up with a non-violent solution.  Discuss human rights violators in modern times and explain why it still goes on and what role should the US play. Technology/Resources - http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/holocaust/timeline.html 21st Century Skills: creativity

Lesson Ideas:  The student will create a power point/Interactive Technology presentation that explains the impact of communication and transportation on society. Technology/Resources - http://www.globalization101.org/ 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

168

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK GEOGRAPHY Analyze the cultural, physical, economic and political characteristics that define regions and describe reasons that regions change over time.

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INDICATOR 19. Interpret data to make comparisons between and among countries and regions including: a. Birth rates; b. Death rates; c. Infant mortality rates; d. Education levels; e. Per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP). 20. Explain how differing points of view play a role in conflicts over territory and resources. 21. Explain how political and economic conditions, resources, geographic locations and cultures have contributed to cooperation and conflict.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF . GEO A 9.1

Lesson Ideas:  The student will analyze different maps, charts, graphs and complete a written explanation.  Research what role the US, international organization and the UN play in these. Technology/Resources - http://www.un.org/ 21st Century Skills: academic

GEO A 9.2

Lesson Ideas:  The students will each be assigned a different conflict in the world, research that conflict using the internet and debate the issue. Technology/Resources - http://www.un.org/

GEO A 9.3

21st Century Skills: academic Lesson Ideas:  The student will be given a list of key resources. They must find out where each comes from, who uses them, relationship that those countries have, and how the have dealt with each other in the past and future. Technology/Resources - http://www.un.org/

Analyze geographic changes brought about by human activity using appropriate maps and other geographic data.

22. Explain the causes and consequences of urbanization including economic development, population growth and environmental change.

GEO B 9.4

21st Century Skills: academic Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze maps of the world population; list the most populated cities and list contributing factors. Students will list the good and bad things that go along with large population. They will also create a list of cities/countries that they think will be growing and explain why.

Analyze the patterns and processes of movement of people, products and ideas.

23. Analyze the social, political, economic and environmental factors that have contributed to human migration now and in the past.

GEO C 9.5

Technology/Resources - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_by_population 21st Century Skills: creative thinking/academic Lesson Ideas:  Divide student into groups with each one being responsible for explaining human’s migration. Students will create a time line looking at the different continents, the population migrations and present their findings to the class. Technology/Resources - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_by_population 21st Century Skills: creative thinking/academic

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

169

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK ECONOMICS Compare how different economic systems answer the fundamental economic questions of what goods and services to produce, how to produce them, and who will consume them. "

"

Explain how the U.S. government provides public services, redistributes income, regulates economic activity, and promotes economic growth and stability.

INDICATOR 24. Describe costs and benefits of trade with regard to: a. Standard of living; b. Productive capacity; c. Usage of productive resources; d. Infrastructure.

E A 9.1

25. Explain how changing methods of production and a country’s productive resources affect how it answers the fundamental economic questions of what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce. 26. Analyze characteristics of traditional, market, command and mixed economies with regard to: a. Private property; b. Freedom of enterprise; c. Competition and consumer choice; d. The role of government. 27. Analyze the economic costs and benefits of protectionism, tariffs, quotas and blockades on international trade.

E A 9.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare and contrast the wealthiest and poorest nation in the world in regards to standard of living, productive capacity, usage of productive resources and infrastructure. Students will create a plan for how the lower countries could catch up the wealthiest using modern techniques and companies. Technology/Resources - http://www.nationmaster.com/index.php 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

E A 9.3

Lesson Ideas:  The student will be assigned a group of traditional, market, command, or mixed economics. They will create a list of the major characteristics. They must also develop a list of conditions needed for their system to work. Technology/Resources - http://www.economywatch.com/world_economy/ 21st Century Skills: academic

E B 9.4

Lesson Ideas:  The students will role play a company owner and the economic costs and benefits of protectionism, tariffs, quotas and blockades on international trade and their business. They will present this in a speech format trying to convince classmates whether they should use any of these techniques. Technology/Resources - http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9061595/protectionism 21st Century Skills: creativity

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

170

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK GOVERNMENT Analyze the differences among various forms of government to determine how power is acquired and used. "

INDICATOR 28. Explain how various systems of governments acquire, use and justify their power.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

GV T B 9.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will list the major government types and where they are practiced today, using the internet for research. They must explain power structures. The students will also look at timelines to give them historical perspective of the country. Technology/Resources - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_system_of_government 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

29. Analyze the purposes, structures and functions of various systems of government including: a. Absolute monarchies; b. Constitutional monarchies; c. Parliamentary democracies; d. Presidential democracies; e. Dictatorships; f. Theocracies.

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Analyze the 30. Analyze and evaluate the differences among influence of various forms of various forms of citizen action on public policy government to including: determine how power a. The French Revolution; is acquired and used. b. The international movement to abolish the slave trade and slavery; c. The Russian Revolution; d. The independence movement in India; e. The fall of communism in Europe; f. The end of apartheid.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

GV T B 9.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will be assigned one of the system and deliver a persuasive speech highlighting the benefits of that system. They must discuss where it is practiced today, where it was practiced in the past, and the pluses/minuses of it. The class will vote at the end on which system they think is the best. Technology/Resources - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_system_of_government 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

CR R A 9.1

Lesson Ideas:  The students will create a chart listing the major traits of the events and define the citizen involvement. Technology/Resources - http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/ http://www.barnsdle.demon.co.uk/russ/rusrev.html 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

171

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze the differences among various forms of government to determine how power is acquired and used. (cont.)

"

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF .

31. Describe and compare opportunities for citizen participation under different systems of government including: a. Absolute monarchies; b. Constitutional monarchies; c. Parliamentary democracies; d. Presidential democracies; e. Dictatorships; f. Theocracies.

CR R A 9.2

32. Analyze how governments and other groups have used propaganda to influence public opinion and behavior.

CR R A 9.3

Lesson Ideas:  The students will create a Venn diagram for the systems of government. Students will develop a Citizenship Handbook using procure software in which they will explain how a citizen can participate under each system. Technology/Resources - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_system_of_government 21st Century Skills: creativity/critical thinking

Lesson Ideas:  The students will look at a number of different examples of propaganda and discuss why they were or weren’t success. Students will create propaganda (poster, power point, letter, video, and etc) and share it with the class. Technology/Resources - http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/propa.html http://www.teacheroz.com/WWIIpropaganda.htm 21st Century Skills: creativity/critical thinking

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Evaluate the reliability 33. Detect bias and propaganda and credibility of in primary and secondary sources. sources of information.

"

Evaluate the reliability and credibility of sources. (cont.)

SM A 9.1

34. Evaluate the credibility of sources for: a. Logical fallacies; b. Consistency of arguments; c. Unstated assumptions; d. Bias.

SM A 9.2

35. Analyze the reliability of sources for: a. Accurate use of facts; b. Adequate support of statements; c. Date of publication.

SM A 9.3

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  The students will read a variety of primary and secondary sources. They will write a reflective summary on the influence of the work. Technology/Resources - http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/propa.html http://www.teacheroz.com/WWIIpropaganda.htm 21st Century Skills: creativity/critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  The students will read articles together and as a group, they will determine if based on logical fallacies; consistency of arguments; unstated assumptions; bias. (using internet to check up on the writing) Technology/Resources - http://www.cnn.com/ 21st Century Skills: critical thinking/teamwork Lesson Ideas:  The students will be provided paragraphs, charts, graphs, (some being true and some being false) and, with the use of internet, they will validate that the information given to them is true of false. Technology/Resources - http://www.cnn.com/ 21st Century Skills: critical thinking/teamwork

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

172

SOCIAL STUDIES WORLD HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK INDICATOR Use data and evidence 36. Develop and present a to support or refute a research project including: thesis. a. Collection of data; b. Narrowing and refining the topic; c. Construction and support of the thesis.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

REF .

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

SM B 9.4

Lesson Ideas:  The students will write a persuasive paper about WWII. They will be required to utilize at least five sources, clearly defining one significant aspect of the war. Technology/Resources - http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

173

UNITED STATES HISTORY

174

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Explain the social, political and economic effects of industrialization.

"

INDICATOR 1. Explain the effects of industrialization in the United States in the 19th century including: a. Changes in work and the workplace; b. Immigration and child labor and their impact on the labor force; c. Modernization of agriculture; d. Urbanization; e. The emergence of a middle class and its impact on leisure, art, music, literature and other aspects of culture.

H B 10.1

2. Analyze the impact of industrialization and the modern corporation in the United States on economic and political practices with emphasis on: a. Laissez-faire policies; b. Monopolies; c. Standard of living.

H B 10.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete research on the working/social classes of the late 1800s. From the research create “A Day in Your Life” story. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://facstaff.bloomu.edu/mhickey/fall%202007%20west%20civ%20wk%207.htm http://www.archaeolink.com/19th_century_american_industrial.htm http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/hum_303/socialism.html 21st Century Skills - Work ethic/dependability: diligence and consistency, willingness to work hard Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Time management skills: reducing wasted effort, focusing energy on what is important

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze editorial cartoons on business, labor and the role of the government.  They will role-play key players during industrialization. Students will have to state their opinion on such issues as laissez-faire, monopolies and standard of living. They will also have to justify their opinion. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://elections.harpweek.com/ http://www.harpweek.com/09Cartoon/SelectThemeReturn.asp?Theme=Theme&TopicID=125&Topic=Labor 21st Century Skills - Interpersonal skills: cooperation, bringing people together, listening, encouraging others Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

175

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the social, political and economic effects of industrialization. (cont.)

"

INDICATOR 3. Analyze the reasons for the rise and growth of labor organizations in the United States (i.e., Knights of Labor, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations) including: a. Unregulated working conditions; b. Laissez-faire policies toward big business; c. Violence toward supporters of organized labor.

4. Explain the goals and outcomes of the late 19th and early 20th century reform movements of Populism and Progressivism with emphasis on: a. Urban reforms; b. Conservation; c. Business regulation and antitrust legislation; d. The movement for public schooling; e. The regulation of child labor.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H B 10.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will describe the violent events that erupted during the Homestead Mill union strike in 1892 and write a summary or complete a cause and effects chart of the strike. Students will then research what are the current concerns of unions and compare and contrast it to those of the late 1800s.  Students will complete a list of both pros and cons for a laissez-faire policy. Discussion to follow. Students will also be given a current corporation and determine how it would be effected by a truly laissez-faire policy to an economy with strict regulations. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://ehistory.osu.edu/osu/mmh/PittsburghSurvey/Homestead/default.cfm http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/sfeature/mh_letters.html http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/sfeature/meet_andrews.html http://loc.harpweek.com/LCPoliticalCartoons/IndexDisplayCartoonMedium.asp?SourceIndex=People&IndexTe xt=Fisk%2C+James&UniqueID=33&Year=1870 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/1900/peopleevents/pande10.html

H B 10.4

21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Work ethic/dependability: diligence and consistency, willingness to work hard Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a web diagram about the platform of the Populist Party.  Students will create a campaign slogan and banner for the Populist Party.  Students will complete a metaphorical comparison of The Wizard of Oz and Populism.  Students will role-play a campaign consultant for the Republican, Democrat or Populist Party during the 1896 election. Devise a strategy for your party to win the presidency.  Students will read an excerpt from The Jungle and list the evidence that demonstrates a need for regulation. Technology/Resources – Textbook, The Jungle, http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module12/intro_pop1.html http://projects.vassar.edu/1896/1896home.html http://www.multied.com/elections/1896.html http://www.uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/national.php?f=0&year=1896 http://www.halcyon.com/piglet/Populism.htm http://www.amphigory.com/oz.htm 21st Century Skills - Self-motivation/initiative: taking on new tasks without being directed by others Academic/learning skills: willingness to continue learning Creativity: finding solutions, being resourceful and inventive

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

176

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze the reasons that countries gained control of territory through imperialism and the impact on people living in the territory that was controlled.

INDICATOR 5. Trace the development of the United States as a world power with emphasis on: a. The Spanish-American War; b. U.S. imperialism in the Far East, South Pacific, Caribbean and Central America.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H C 10.5

Lesson Ideas:  Students will have a classroom debate on the isolationist philosophy of the United States.  Students will create a commemorative coin for the Monroe Doctrine.  Students will categorize the overseas actions by the United States to become a world power. Determine whether each action fell under the philosophy of the Monroe Doctrine and later Roosevelt Corollary. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/1898/intro.html http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/bryan.htm http://www.annenbergclassroom.org/Downloads/LessonPlans/World%20Bully%20or%20World%20Leader.pdf 21st Century Skills - Creativity: finding solutions, being resourceful and inventive Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Interpersonal skills: cooperation, bringing people together, listening, encouraging others

Connect developments related to World War I with the onset of World War II.

6. Trace the development of the United States as a world power with emphasis on: a. The decision to enter into World War I; b. President Wilson’s Fourteen Points; c. The Treaty of Versailles; d. The decision of the United States not to participate in the League of Nations.

H D 10.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a decision tree on whether the U.S. should enter WWI.  Students will label a map of the Allied Powers, Central Powers and neutral nations during WWI.  Have students write a speech from the perspective of a peace advocate in 1938. The speech will assess the impact of post-World War I economic, social and political events on the prospects for continued peace.  Students will debate whether the U.S. should have entered into the League of Nations.  Students will analyze editorial cartoons on Wilson’s 14 Points and the Treaty of Versailles. Technology/Resources – Textbook, www.worldwar1.com http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=62 http://library.thinkquest.org/CR0215466/treaty_of_versailles.htm http://memory.loc.gov/cgibin/query/S?ammem/nfor:@field(SOURCE%[email protected](Lodge,%20Henry%20Cabot,%201850-1924)) 21st Century Skills - Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

177

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Connect developments related to World War I with the onset of World War II. (cont.)

Analyze connections between World War II, the Cold War and contemporary conflicts.

INDICATOR 7. Analyze the impact of U.S. participation in World War II, with emphasis on the change from isolationism to international involvement including the reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor.

8. Explain how the Cold War and related conflicts influenced U.S. foreign policy after 1945 with emphasis on: a. The Marshall Plan; b. Communist containment, including the Truman Doctrine, Berlin Blockade and Cuban Missile Crisis; c. The Korean War and the Vietnam War.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H D 10.7

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a series of slogans that describe the political stance of the United States both before and after Pearl Harbor.  Students will list the reasons and actions the U.S. took to remain neutral and in a second column list the acts and actions that pulled America into WWII.  Students will label a map of the major battles the U.S. was in and label it with the date and victor. Complete a summary afterwards. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/pearlhbr/pearlhbr.htm http://www.history.navy.mil/branches/teach/pearl/infamy/infamy6.htm http://www.authentichistory.com/ww2/news/19411207-8.html http://www.whitehousehistory.org/04/subs/04_b_1941.html http://www.goforbroke.org/learning/learning_teachers_lesson_world.asp

H E 10.8

21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Creativity: finding solutions, being resourceful and inventive Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a list of questions for significant people during the Cold War. Students will then roleplay these people to write the answers.  Students will identify the problems created by the Cold War both internationally and domestically.  Students will identify, define and rank the events of the Cold War from those that brought us closest to nuclear war to those that helped the situation thaw out.  Students will create a cause and effect table of the major events of the Vietnam War. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/days/bay_of_pigs.html http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/vietnam/index.html http://www.dailysoft.com/berlinwall/index.html http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/vietnam/index.html http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/media/fourteen_days_in_october.pdf http://www.trumanlibrary.org/whistlestop/study_collections/korea/large/onepeople.htm http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/marshall/marsh2.htm http://www.trumanlibrary.org/teacher/doctrine.htm http://www.historyworksohio.org/classroom/plan-moesc.cfm?id=3 21st Century Skills - Problem-solving skills: systematically identifying and tackling problems Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

178

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify major historical patterns in the domestic affairs of the United States during the 20th century and explain their significance.

"

INDICATOR 9. Analyze the major political, economic and social developments of the 1920s including: a. The Red Scare; b. Women’s right to vote; c. African-American migrations from the South to the North; d. Immigration restrictions, nativism, race riots and the reemergence of the Ku Klux Klan; e. The Roaring Twenties and the Harlem Renaissance; f. Stock market speculation and the stock market crash of 1929. 10. Analyze the causes and consequences of major political, economic and social developments of the 1930s with emphasis on: a. The Great Depression; b. The Dust Bowl; c. The New Deal.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H F 10.9

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a critical-thinking group discussion on what caused the Great Depression.  Students will compare and contrast immigration restrictions, nativism, race riots and the reemergence of the Ku Klux Klan with the current state of immigration and race relations.  Students will compare and contrast Prohibition to the current “War on Drugs” by the U.S. Government. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/YourScrapbook?scrapid=18065 http://www.lawlessdecade.net/20.htm http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/exploring/harlem/facesmain_text.html http://marketplace.publicradio.org/features/crash_1929/index.html http://www.columbia.edu/itc/history/odonnell/w1010/edit/migration/migration.html http://www.coe.unt.edu/TeacherTools/webquests/mccarthyism/mccarthyism.htm http://www.edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=438 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others Teamwork/collaboration: working in a group to accomplish goals

H F 10.10

Lesson Ideas:  Students will make a chart listing examples of F.D.R.’s relief recovery and reform plans, which also list the problems they attempted to solve.  Students will create similes of how sick the American nation was in the 1930s.  Students will evaluate the reform programs of the New Deal to determine whether they have had an overall positive or negative effect on our country. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.michigan.gov/hal/0,1607,7-160-17451_18670_18793-53511--,00.html http://www.slideshare.net/ccarter333/fdrs-new-deal/ http://www.slideshare.net/ccarter333/opposition-to-the-new-deal http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/lessons/97/depress/lesson2.html http://www.econedlink.org/lessons/index.cfm?lesson=EM558 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Creativity: finding solutions, being resourceful and inventive

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

179

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify major historical patterns in the domestic affairs of the United States during the 20th century and explain their significance. (cont.)

"

"

INDICATOR 11. Analyze the impact of U.S. participation in World War II with emphasis on: a. Events on the home front to support the war effort, including industrial mobilization, women and minorities in the workforce; b. The internment of Japanese-Americans.

H F 10.11

12. Explain major domestic developments after 1945 with emphasis on: a. Postwar prosperity in the United States; b. McCarthyism; c. The space race; d. Immigration patterns.

H F 10.12

13. Trace social unrest, protest and change in the United States including: a. Antiwar protest during the Vietnam War; b. The counterculture movement; c. The women’s liberation movement.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze posters created by the Government for the war effort. Identify the underlying motives and themes in them.  Students will debate whether reparations are necessary for the Japanese-Americans interned during World War II. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.historyworksohio.org/HWII/classroom/activity.cfm?id=62 http://www.historyworksohio.org/HWII/classroom/activity.cfm?id=76 http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/japanese-relocation/ 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Interpersonal skills: cooperation, bringing people together, listening, encouraging others Lesson Ideas:  Students will chart the programs that were implemented or resisted by the presidents of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Students should also state how effectively each president represented the political party with which he was affiliated. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.historyworksohio.org/HWII/classroom/activity.cfm?id=103 http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/mccarthy-telegram/ http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/sputnik-memo/

H F 10.13

21st Century Skills - Time management skills: reducing wasted effort, focusing energy on what is important Organizational skills: managing tasks, efficiency, timeliness, and productivity Lesson Ideas:  Students will make inferences as to the characteristics of those that participated in past protest movements. Complete a profile of a protestor.  Students will determine which protest movement in our history that you would have wanted to participate in. In an essay share your thoughts on why you chose that movement over two other movements. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://omp.ohiolink.edu/OMP/NewDetails?oid=3621707 http://www.brownielocks.com/sixtieswarsongs.html http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/sistersof77/movement.html 21st Century Skills - Work ethic/dependability: diligence and consistency, willingness to work hard Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

180

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify major historical patterns in the domestic affairs of the United States during the 20th century and explain their significance. (cont.)

INDICATOR 14. Analyze the origins, major developments, controversies and consequences of the civil rights movement with emphasis on: a. Brown v. Board of Education; b. Changes in goals and tactics of leading civil rights advocates and organizations; c. The linkages between the civil rights movement and movements to gain justice for other minority groups.

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Analyze the influence 15. Describe how the of different cultural perspectives of cultural perspectives on the groups helped to create actions of groups. political action groups such as: a. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP); b. National Organization for Women (NOW); c. American Indian Movement (AIM); d. United Farm Workers.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H F 10.14

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze data of average annual earnings of different minority groups. Lesson: Trace the changes to the various civil rights movements.  Students will analyze data of the percentage of high school and college graduates for different minority groups. Determine what events had a significant impact on the changes in graduation rates. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.historyworksohio.org/classroom/activity.cfm?id=48 http://www.historyworksohio.org/HWII/classroom/activity.cfm?id=8 http://www.historyworksohio.org/HWII/classroom/activity.cfm?id=26 http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/brown-v-board/ 21st Century Skills - Problem-solving skills: systematically identifying and tackling problems Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations

PS A 10.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare and contrast political action groups related to culture groups by doing an activity such as a Venn diagram. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.ufw.org/_page.php?menu=research&inc=research_history.html http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/45a/267.html https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S02_BA_L10_I01_01.pdf 21st Century Skills - Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

181

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Analyze the influence of different cultural perspectives on the actions of groups. (cont.)

16. Analyze the perspectives that are evident in AfricanAmerican, American Indian and Latino art, music, literature and media and how these contributions reflect and shape culture in the United States.

PS A 10.2

Analyze the consequences of oppression, discrimination and conflict between cultures.

17. Explain how Jim Crow laws legalized discrimination based on race.

PS B 10.3

18. Analyze the struggle for racial and gender equality and its impact on the changing status of minorities since the late 19th century.

PS B 10.4

19. Explain the effects of immigration on society in the United States: a. Housing patterns; b. Political affiliation; c. Education system; d. Language; e. Labor practices; f. Religion.

PS C 10.5

"

Analyze the ways that contacts between people of different cultures result in exchanges of cultural practices.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Through research student will list how our daily lives have incorporated perspectives from different cultures. From this research make predictions on what further changes we will embrace in the future. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.liunet.edu/cwis/cwp/library/aavaahp.htm http://www.pbs.org/jazz/index.htm 21st Century Skills - Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others Problem-solving skills: systematically identifying and tackling problems Lesson Ideas:  Students will make a detailed list of how the daily life of an African American was impacted by Jim Crow laws. Determine how that would affect one’s feelings, outlook on life and relationship with his/her country. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.jimcrowhistory.org/ http://www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/maps.html http://www.ferris.edu/news/jimcrow/what.htm 21st Century Skills - Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others Teamwork/collaboration: working in a group to accomplish goals Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare the salary differences between genders and races. Determine what effects this has on these groups. Research 5 major corporations and categorize the top-level management into a racial and gender bar graph. Make inferences from this data. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.diversityatwork.com.au/node/394 http://www.springerlink.com/content/q257r003194h7565/ 21st Century Skills - Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others Organizational skills: managing tasks, efficiency, timeliness, and productivity Lesson Ideas:  Through research of current trends, students will predict where the United States society will be in the distant future due to the effects of immigration. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/national/longterm/meltingpot/meltingpot.htm http://www.mla.org/map_main http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/activity/immigration/ 21st Century Skills - Self-motivation/initiative: taking on new tasks without being directed by others Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

182

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK GEOGRAPHY Analyze the cultural, physical, economic and political characteristics that define regions and describe reasons that regions change over time.

Analyze geographic changes brought about by human activity using appropriate maps and other geographic data.

Analyze the patterns and processes of movement of people, products and ideas.

INDICATOR 20. Explain how perceptions and characteristics of geographic regions in the United States have changed over time including: a. Urban areas; b. Wilderness; c. Farmland; d. Centers of industry and technology.

GEO A 10.1

21. Describe how changes in technology, transportation and communication affect the location and patterns of economic activities and use of productive resources.

GEO B 10.2

22. Analyze the geographic processes that contributed to changes in American society including: a. Industrialization and post-industrialization; b. Urbanization and suburbanization; c. Immigration.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze demographic data and distinguish countries based on demographic differences between them. They will develop and test hypotheses about the sources of demographic differences. They will compare information they find on the United States and other countries that vary from industrialized to third world. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/10/g912/region.html http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/04/g912/place.html http://www.pbs.org/johngardner/chapters/5b.html 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Teamwork/collaboration: working in a group to accomplish goals Lesson Ideas:  Students will read Wired, Zapped, and Beamed, 1960's through 1980's and Digitally Networked, 1990's Through Today, articles on the history of television and how it evolved due to technological improvements such as satellites. Students will then make predictions on what the future holds for television and how that will impact the economy and their lives. Technology/Resources – Textbook, Wired, Zapped, and Beamed, 1960's through 1980's and Digitally Networked, and 1990's Through Today, http://www.dallasfed.org/research/pubs/agtech.html http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cold.war/experience/technology/

GEO C 10.3

21st Century Skills - Academic/learning skills: willingness to continue learning Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Lesson Ideas:  Students will make inferences from maps that show the: a) Population of cities before, during and after industrialization. b) Population of cities and outlying areas before and after suburbanization.  Students will make inferences from charts that show the flow of immigrants to the United States. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.migrationinformation.org/datahub/maps.cfm http://www.pbs.org/perilousfight/home_front/americans_on_the_move/ http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/landing.cfm;jsessionid=f830521611182349067638?migration=9&bhc p=1 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Interpersonal skills: cooperation, bringing people together, listening, encouraging others

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

183

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK ECONOMICS Compare how different economic systems answer the fundamental economic questions of what goods and services to produce, how to produce them, and who will consume them.

INDICATOR 23. Evaluate the effects of specialization, trade and interdependence on the economic system of the United States.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

E A 10.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze images and statistics to determine the impact of resources upon a world region's standard of living.  Students will complete the reading charting the trade routes of the future: towards a borderless economy. Students will restate the article in an outline form. Afterwards, students will make inferences on how they will be personally impacted by the changing economics of the future including globalization. Technology/Resources – Textbook, “Charting the trade routes of the future: towards a borderless economy”, http://sorrel.humboldt.edu/~economic/econ104/protect/ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/6279679.stm http://www.wto.org/English/news_e/pres97_e/pr77_e.htm 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Problem-solving skills: systematically identifying and tackling problems

"

24. Analyze the development and impacts of labor unions, farm organizations and business organizations on the U.S. economy.

E A 10.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will explore the two different types of franchises, analyze the pros and cons between starting a franchise business verses a privately owned business and will apply what they have learned by selecting an American franchise they think would be an appropriate new business they might start in your local community.  Students will view The Fight in the Fields, the story of Cesar Chavez and the farmworkers’ struggles. Students will compare this movement and leader to determine how his actions rank compared to such notable figures as Dr. King and Gandhi. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.pbs.org/itvs/fightfields/ Video - The Fight in the Fields, http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/histryotln/reform.htm 21st Century Skills - Multicultural skills: appreciating differences in the customs and beliefs of others Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations

Explain how the U.S. government provides public services, redistributes income, regulates economic activity, and promotes economic growth and stability.

25. Demonstrate how U.S. governmental policies, including taxes, antitrust legislation and environmental regulations affect individuals and businesses.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

E B 10.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a cause an effect table on government actions that impacted the economy: (examples Sherman Antitrust Act, Clayton Antitrust Act, The Clean Air Act) Technology/Resources – Textbook,

http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/oecon/chap2.htm http://www.oag.state.ny.us/business/antitrust.html 21st Century Skills - Teamwork/collaboration: working in a group to accomplish goals Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

184

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how the U.S. government provides public services, redistributes income, regulates economic activity, and promotes economic growth and stability. (cont.)

"

GOVERNMENT Analyze the evolution of the Constitution through postReconstruction amendments and Supreme Court decisions.

"

INDICATOR 26. Explain the reasons for the creation of the Federal Reserve System and its importance to the economy.

E B 10.4

27. Analyze the impact of the Great Depression and World War II on the economy of the United States and the resulting expansion of the role of the federal government.

E B 10.5

28. Examine the U.S. Constitution as a living document by analyzing its evolution through amendments and Supreme Court decisions including: a. Plessy v. Ferguson; b. Brown v. Board of Education; c. Regents of the University of California v. Bakke.

GVT A 10.1

29. Explain why the 19th and 26th Amendments were enacted and how they affected individuals and groups.

GVT A 10.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will perform an Internet search on the current actions of the Federal Reserve. Technology/Resources - http://stlouisfed.org/publications/pleng/default.html http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/frseries/frseri3.htm http://www.federalreserveeducation.org/fed101/structure/ 21st Century Skills - Time management skills: reducing wasted effort, focusing energy on what is important Self-motivation/initiative: taking on new tasks without being directed by others Lesson Ideas:  Students will debate whether the New Deal or World War II had a greater impact on getting the United States out of the Great Depression. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/us34.cfm http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe40s/money_11.html http://www.colorado.edu/AmStudies/lewis/west/depresstime.pdf 21st Century Skills - Interpersonal skills: cooperation, bringing people together, listening, encouraging others Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze the readings Federalist #78 and Anti-Federalist #78 and restate in your own words to understand the initial thoughts on our judicial branch.  Students will Pick a court case (or amendment) and discuss its history, trace its evolution, and tie it to current events of today. Technology/Resources - Textbook , http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0101289.html http://www.constitution.org/ussc/usscdeci.htm 21st Century Skills - Problem-solving skills: systematically identifying and tackling problems Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Lesson Ideas:  Students will make a list of the opportunities and changes one can have due to gaining suffrage.  Students will complete a cause and effect table on the 19th and 26th Amendments. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.pbs.org/stantonanthony/ http://hti.osu.edu/opper/display.cfm?id=16 21st Century Skills - Creativity: finding solutions, being resourceful and inventive Problem-solving skills: systematically identifying and tackling problems

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

185

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Analyze the 30. Describe the ways in CRR differences among which government policy A various forms of has been shaped and set by 10.1 government to the influence of political determine how power parties, interest groups, is acquired and used. lobbyists, the media and public opinion with emphasis on: a. Extension of suffrage; b. Labor legislation; c. Civil rights legislation; d. Military policy; e. Environmental legislation; f. Business regulation; g. Educational policy.

"

31. Explain how civil disobedience differs from other forms of dissent and evaluate its application and consequences including: a. Women’s suffrage movement of the late 1800s; b. Civil rights movement of the 1960s; c. Student protests during the Vietnam War.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

CRR A 10.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research how a part of our society has changed due to the efforts of interest groups, political parties, media and public opinion. A prediction of the future status of the selected part of society will also be completed. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://ehistory.osu.edu/osu/mmh/ohiodry/brdsds.cfm http://www.historyworksohio.org/HWII/classroom/activity.cfm?id=47 http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpedu/features/timeline/depwwii/unions/unions.html http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAhuac.htm http://people.virginia.edu/~abw3j/345gc/Home.html 21st Century Skills - Academic/learning skills: willingness to continue learning Time management skills: reducing wasted effort, focusing energy on what is important

Lesson Ideas:  Students will write a how-to manual on civil disobedience using the methods from our past. Technology/Resources – Textbook, https://ims.ode.state.oh.us/ODE/IMS/Lessons/Web_Content/CSS_LP_S06_BA_L10_I02_01.pdf http://www.infoplease.com/spot/civilrightstimeline1.html http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/learning_history/vietnam/vietnam_music.cfm http://content.lib.washington.edu/protestsweb/index.html 21st Century Skills - Leadership skills: taking responsibility and guiding others Work ethic/dependability: diligence and consistency, willingness to work hard

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

186

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how individual rights are relative, not absolute, and describe the balance between individual rights, the rights of others, and the common good.

"

REF.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

32. Explain the considerations and criteria commonly used in determining what limits should be placed on specific rights including: a. Clear and present danger; b. Compelling government interest; c. National security; d. Libel or slander; e. Public safety; f. Equal opportunity

CRR B 10.3

Lesson Ideas:  Have students respond to what the government should do in hypothetical situations regarding different rights. Students will also compose their own situations for fellow classmates to appraise.

33. Analyze instances in which the rights of individuals were restricted including: a. Conscientious objectors in World War I; b. Immigrants during the Red Scare; c. Intellectuals and artists during the McCarthy Era; d. African-Americans during the civil rights movement.

CRR B 10.4

INDICATOR

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Technology/Resources http://www.law.washington.edu/streetlaw/lessons/Tort%20Hypotheticals%20and%20Answers.pdf http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0829656.html 21st Century Skills - Interpersonal skills: cooperation, bringing people together, listening, encouraging others Creativity: finding solutions, being resourceful and inventive

Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare and contrast the Patriot Act and actions done on the home front by the government during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to the restriction of rights done during the Red Scare, World War I and the civil rights movement. Technology/Resources – Textbook, http://www.crf-usa.org/bria/bria19_4a.htm http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/mccarthyism.html http://www.quotationspage.com/special.php3?file=w971123 21st Century Skills - Self-motivation/initiative: taking on new tasks without being directed by others

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

187

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES HISTORY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Evaluate the reliability 34. Determine the and credibility of credibility of sources by sources. considering the following: a. The qualifications and reputation of the writer; b. Agreement with other credible sources; c. Recognition of stereotypes; d. Accuracy and consistency of sources; e. The circumstances in which the author prepared the source. " 35. Critique evidence used to support a thesis. Use data and evidence to support or refute a thesis.

36. Analyze one or more issues and present a persuasive argument to defend a position.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

SM A 10.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will give an oral report on a current issue. They will utilize information they find at opposing interest groups. They will determine the credibility, bias and accuracy of each side’s information. Technology/Resources - http://www.multcolib.org/homework/sochc.html http://www.sdst.org/shs/library/issues.html www.procon.org 21st Century Skills - Time management skills: reducing wasted effort, focusing energy on what is important Self-motivation/initiative: taking on new tasks without being directed by others

SM A 10.2 SM B 10.3

Technology/Resources - http://www.chesapeake.edu/asc/writing/CritiqueHandout.pdf 21st Century Skills - Critical Thinking: analyzing and evaluating situations Lesson Ideas:  Students will research a current issue and develop a persuasive argument. They will have to defend their position against another classmate. Technology/Resources - http://projects.edtech.sandi.net/staffdev/tpss99/processguides/persuasive.html http://www.multcolib.org/homework/sochc.html http://www.sdst.org/shs/library/issues.html www.procon.org 21st Century Skills - Time management skills: reducing wasted effort, focusing energy on what is important Self-motivation/initiative: taking on new tasks without being directed by others

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

188

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

189

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Explain patterns of historical continuity and change by challenging arguments of historical inevitability.

Use historical interpretations to explain current issues.

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

1. Challenge arguments of historical inevitability by giving examples of how different choices could have led to different consequences (e.g., choices made during the Civil War, choices relating to immigration policy, or choices made during the Cuban Missile Crisis).

H A 12.1

2. Analyze primary source material to see if a historical interpretation is supported.

H B 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research relevant events such as Watergate, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the use of atomic weapons, Plessy v. Ferguson, etc. and examine how history has been affected by the choices made regarding them. Resources and Technology: http://america.eb.com/, class textbook, http://auth.grolier.com/login/go_login_page.html 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and Problem Solving skills, Information Literacy

Lesson Ideas:  Students will obtain primary sources such as editorials, policy statements, legal documents, newspaper reports, and editorial cartoons. These primary sources are analyzed for a close-up look at the past and a connection with current issues. Resources and Technology: http://ars.sirs.com/denied?sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-portal-res%3Fid=SOH1360-09999, http://cagle.msnbc.com/politicalcartoons/ 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical thinking and Problem-solving skills

"

3. Analyze cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation including the influence of ideas, the role of chance and individual and collective action.

H B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will take the position of a Senator who must vote on a foreign aid bill and write a speech supporting or opposing foreign aid. They should consider the benefits and drawbacks of providing aid and the public opinion on foreign aid. Resources and Technology: http://voinovich.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Contact.ContactForm , http://brown.senate.gov/contact/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and Problem-solving skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

190

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Analyze how issues 4. Identify the perspectives may be viewed of diverse cultural groups differently by various when analyzing current cultural groups. issues.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

PS A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will select an issue in the upcoming presidential election (or in an off-election year, choose an issue that was stressed during the election and look at the present day impact) and research how it impacts diverse cultural groups. Issues could be the economy, the war in Iraq, the rising cost of health care, to name a few.  Students will write an essay on: Do you favor increasing or decreasing the number of immigrants allowed into the U.S.? Consider the benefits and challenges of diversity. Resources and Technology: http://find.galegroup.com/ovrc/start.do?prodId=OVRC&userGroupName=chag15532 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical thinking and Problem-solving skills, Multicultural skills

"

5. Analyze proposed solutions to current issues from the perspectives of diverse cultural groups.

PS A 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will create a chart that illustrates how diverse cultural groups feel about candidates’ statements on current issues. Resources and Technology: http://www.gallup.com/poll/8776/Blacks-Hispanics-Eye-Run-White-House.aspx , http://www.asianamericansforobama.com/home/2007/01/index.html , http://politics.nytimes.com/electionguide/2008/issues/abortion/index.html 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/collaboration, Information Literacy, Creativity, Multicultural skills

Identify the causes of political, economic and social oppression and analyze ways individuals, organizations and countries respond to resulting conflicts.

6. Analyze ways countries and organizations respond to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity (e.g., English only/bilingual education, theocracies/religious freedom, immigration quotas/open immigration policy, single-sex schools/coeducation).

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research and debate the pros and cons of specific ways organizations and countries have responded to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity.  Students will examine and discuss laws and court cases that have impacted diverse groups in the United States. Resources and Technology: http://find.galegroup.com/ovrc/start.do?prodId=OVRC&userGroupName=chag15532 , http://www.orphansofrwanda.org/ , http://www.darfurgenocide.org/ 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Multicultural skills, Critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

191

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Identify the causes of political, economic and social oppression and analyze ways individuals, organizations and countries respond to resulting conflicts. (cont.)

7. Evaluate the effectiveness of international governmental organizations (e.g. United Nations, European Union, World Court and Organization of American States), multinational corporations, and nongovernmental organizations (Amnesty International, Red Cross and World Council of Churches) in the global arena.

PS B 12.4

Explain the role of diverse cultural institutions in shaping American society.

8. Evaluate the role of institutions in guiding, transmitting, preserving and changing culture.

PS C 12.5

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research and debate the pros and cons of specific ways organizations and countries have responded to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity.  Students will participate in the Model United Nations Program. Resources and Technology: http://web.ebscohost.com/src/results?vid=3&hid=15&sid=98e91947-e330-4058b0eb-f03f142a2e61%40sessionmgr103 , http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/modelun/index.asp 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Multicultural skills, Critical thinking

Lesson Ideas:  Students will discuss how political campaigns target diverse cultural groups and institutions. Resources and Technology: http://www.gallup.com/poll/8776/Blacks-Hispanics-Eye-Run-White-House.aspx , http://www.asianamericansforobama.com/home/2007/01/index.html , http://politics.nytimes.com/electionguide/2008/issues/abortion/index.html 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Interpersonal skills, Multicultural skills

GEOGRAPHY

Explain how the character and meaning of a place reflect a society’s economics, politics, social values, ideology and culture.

9. Explain how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, government policy, current values and ideals as they design and build specialized buildings, neighborhoods, shopping centers, urban centers and industrial parks.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

GEO A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will investigate ways local governments promote the public good. Resources and Technology: Chagrin Valley Times, Chagrin Sun Newspaper, News Herald, Plain Dealer 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

192

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Evaluate the consequences of geographic and environmental changes resulting from governmental policies and human modifications to the physical environment.

"

Use appropriate data sources and geographic tools to analyze and evaluate public policies.

ECONOMICS Analyze how scarcity of productive resources affects supply, demand, inflation and economic choices.

INDICATOR 10. Describe the intended and unintended effects of human modifications to the physical environment and weigh the costs and benefits of alternative approaches to addressing environmental concerns (e.g., alternative sources of energy, mass transportation systems, or farmland and wetland preservation). 11. Analyze policies and programs for natural resource use and management considering possible trade-offs between environmental quality and economic growth.

GEO B 12.2

12. Use appropriate data sources and tools to gather, manipulate, interpret and communicate geographic information related to civic/global issues.

GEO C 12.4

13. Compare how values and beliefs influence economic decisions in different communities.

E A 12.1

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will view Al Gore receiving the Nobel Prize for his work on raising awareness to Global Warming. Resources and Technology: http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/ , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_environmental_organizations 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking

GEO B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will evaluate an elected officials decision to support an issue because of personal beliefs or because of the voice of his/her constituents. Resources and Technology: http://www.ontheissues.org/default.htm , http://www.2decide.com/table.htm , http://www.ontheissues.org/Senate/Senate.htm 21st Century Skills: Problem-solving skills, Critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Students will identify those individuals or groups that provide information to elected officials (White House Staffers, interest groups, and government agencies). Resources and Technology: http://www.whitehouse.gov/government/off-descrp.html , http://www.house.gov/ 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning skills, Information Literacy

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze examples of why different communities make the economic decisions they make i.e. building a shopping mall, giving tax abatements, preserving a small town atmosphere.

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

193

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how voluntary worldwide trade, specialization and interdependence among countries affect standards of living and economic growth.

Analyze the role of fiscal and regulatory policies in a mixed economy. "

GOVERNMENT Evaluate, take and defend positions about issues concerning the alignment of the characteristics of American democracy with realities in the United States today.

INDICATOR 14. Identify reasons for and the impacts of multinational economic organizations: a. Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC); b. European Monetary Union; c. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA); d. World Trade Organization (WTO); e. World Bank. 15. Analyze economic policy decisions made by governments that have resulted in intended and unintended consequences.

E C 12.5

16. Identify public policies that may cost more than the benefits they generate, assess who enjoys the benefits, who bears the cost and explain why the policies exist.

E D 12.7

17. Identify and analyze an issue related to domestic or foreign policy in the United States (e.g., human rights, intervention in conflicts between other countries, or health care).

GVT A 12.1

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will discuss how international trade promotes healthy economies. Resources and Technology: http://planning.co.cuyahoga.oh.us/blog/labels/Chagrin%20Falls.html , http://www.city.cleveland.oh.us/government/departments/commdev/cdneigdev/cdndtaxabatement.html 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Multicultural skills, Problem-solving skills

E D 12.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will examine economic policy, laws and policies identifying consequences. Resources and Technology: http://my.econedlink.org/cyberteach/ , http://www.treas.gov/offices/economicpolicy/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will evaluate the government practice of “pork-barrel spending”.  Students will share “interest group” specific issues.  Students will discuss environmental government policies. Resources and Technology: http://www.cagw.org/site/PageServer?pagename=policy_Pork_Barrel_Spending , http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Teamwork/collaboration, Academic/learning skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a researched debate, or research paper on a topic mutually agreed upon between teacher and student. APA style format will be used for title page, abstract, citations and bibliography page. Students are also required to use turnitin.com with this assignment. Resources and Technology: http://www.turnitin.com/static/home.html , Writers Inc. 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Creativity, Academic/learning skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

194

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Evaluate, take and defend positions about issues concerning the alignment of the characteristics of American democracy with realities in the United States today. (cont.) Explain how the U.S. Constitution has evolved including its philosophical foundations, amendments and court interpretations.

Analyze how citizens participate in the election process in the United States.

INDICATOR 18. Explain how individuals and groups, both governmental and nongovernmental, influence domestic and foreign policy and evaluate how these actions reflect characteristics of American democracy. 19. Explain the key arguments made for and against the ratification of the Constitution and illustrate how those arguments influence contemporary political debate.

20. Identify and analyze issues related to the election process in the United States (e.g., election board policies, technology used in elections, media reporting of election results).

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. GVT A 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will assess individual interest-group agendas and their ability to affect the implementation of government policy.  Students will examine the role of the media in American democracy. Resources and Technology: , http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ , http://web.ebscohost.com/src/results?vid=2&hid=117&sid=17b0cf64-1c8e-48e7-9d925cd741f93c26%40sessionmgr2

GVT B 12.3

21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Information Literacy Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare the philosophies of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists in the ratification of the Constitution.  Students will create a timeline on the development of the concept of individual rights in American political history. Resources and Technology: http://library.thinkquest.org/11572/creation/framing/feds.html , http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson_index.asp , http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/materials/timeline/

GVT C 12.4

21st Century Skills: Problem-solving skills, Critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  As a class, create an overall plan for elections by deciding upon nominating methods, election administration and campaign financing.  Students will present a plan designed to identify reasons for low voter turnout and solutions to each reason for nonvoting.  Students will analyze our school elections as an authentic experience. Resources and Technology: Student council results, http://hnn.us/articles/1161.html , http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0763629.html , http://www.pbs.org/elections/kids/educators.html 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Teamwork/collaboration, Problem- solving skills

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Evaluate various 21. Practice forms of civic CRR means for citizens to discussion and participation A take action on a consistent with the ideals of 12.1 particular issue. citizens of a democratic republic: a. Persuasive speech; b. Panel discussion; c. Debate. Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  Students will participate in a persuasive debate. Resources and Technology: http://find.galegroup.com/ovrc/start.do?prodId=OVRC&userGroupName=chag15532 , debate rubric 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning skills, Information Literacy, Critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

195

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Evaluate various means for citizens to take action on a particular issue. (cont.)

"

"

"

"

INDICATOR 22. Evaluate policies that have been proposed as ways of dealing with social changes resulting from new technologies (e.g., censorship of the media, intellectual property rights, or organ donation). 23. Analyze relationships and tensions between national sovereignty and international accords and organizations (e.g., international agreements on environmental issues, trade agreements, arms agreements, European Union or NATO). 24. Explain and demonstrate knowledge of federal and Ohio freedom of information and open meeting laws.

CRR A 12.2

25. Explain how to file a request for public information using either the appropriate federal or Ohio freedom of information statute. 26. Prepare a plan of action that defines a community issue and suggest alternative solutions or courses of action based on appropriate criteria.

CRR A 12.5

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Current issues articles from the internet, newspapers, or magazines will be used regularly to connect the textbook with everyday life. Resources and Technology: http://www.chagrin-falls.k12.oh.us/cfhs/library/researchdatabases.htm , Newsweek, Plain Dealer 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical thinking

CRR A 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will be assessed on relevant International Relations terms. Topics covered are, collective security, economic interdependence, environmental interdependence, and U.S. relations with other countries.  Students will examine Newsweek magazine to gain a current understanding of international relations. Resources and Technology: Newsweek, http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com/search/assetDetail.cfm?guidAssetID=50312234-C985-4831-AD924F2B4246D39D 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning skills, Information Literacy, Interpersonal skills

CRR A 12.4

Lesson Ideas:  Students will read documents, define or list main ideas of public meeting laws. They will discuss in class the relevance and importance of these laws. Resources and Technology: http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/5902-2-01 , http://www.ohioworkforce.org/docs/jobseekers/Freedom%20of%20Information%20Act.pdf 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills, Flexibility/adaptability Lesson Ideas:  Using local politicians as a source of information, students will file a request for public information. Resources and Technology: local councilperson or lawyer 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning skills, Creativity, Problem-solving skills

CRR A 12.6

Lesson Ideas:  In a cooperative learning setting students will be given a community topic. Students will brainstorm a plan of action. Examples; passing a school levy, building a skateboarders park, changing the curfew. Resources and Technology: copy of village constitution, attend a council meeting to see how it works, talk to Mayor or Superintendent of schools 21st Century Skills: Team/collaboration, Critical thinking, Time management skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

196

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Evaluate various means for citizens to take action on a particular issue. (cont.)

"

Explain how the exercise of a citizen’s rights and responsibilities helps to strengthen a democracy.

INDICATOR 27. Analyze the causes, consequences and possible solutions to persistent, contemporary and emerging world problems (e.g. health, security, resource allocation, economic development or environmental quality). 28. Analyze how democracy, the free flow of information, global economic interdependence, or human rights movements can cause change within a country.

CRR A 12.7

29. Compare elements, proceedings and decisions related to the right to a fair trial in criminal and civil courts and describe alternatives to litigation for maintaining order and resolving conflicts within the U.S. legal system including: a. Mediation; b. Arbitration; c. Alternative dispute resolution; d. Plea-bargaining.

CRR B 12.9

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain and evaluate 30. Obtain and evaluate information from pub- information from public lic records and other records and other resources resources related to a related to a public policy public policy issue. issue.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will present policy papers designed to address the issues of health, security, resource allocation, economic development and environmental quality of select nations. Resources and Technology: http://ochaonline.un.org/ , http://find.galegroup.com/srcx/start.do?prodId=SRC1&userGroupName=chag15532 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning skills, Literacy Information, Critical thinking

CRR A 12.8

Lesson Ideas:  Students will examine the steps that led to the end of the U.S.S.R. as covered in the chapter on comparing political and economic systems. Resources and Technology: http://web.ebscohost.com/src/results?vid=2&hid=2&sid=1a6e5f30-09de-489db41e-0156c3da6d5e%40sessionmgr8 , http://web.ebscohost.com/src/results?vid=4&hid=12&sid=1a6e5f30-09de489d-b41e-0156c3da6d5e%40sessionmgr8 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will define the relevant terms listed in the indicator and examine a chart on the legal process. Resources and Technology: http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/legalotln/ , http://usinfo.state.gov/dhr/democracy/u.s._legal_system.html 21st Century Skills: Flexibility/adaptability, Self-motivation/initiative

SM A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will discuss and defend a position regarding a current item on the ballot. Resources and Technology: Authentic ballot text, http://www.sos.state.oh.us/sos/ElectionsVoter/CurrentElection.aspx , http://blog.cleveland.com/openers/2007/10/strip_club_regulations_wont_be.html 21st Century Skills: Interpersonal skills, Information Literacy, Critical thinking

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

197

SOCIAL STUDIES UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Obtain and evaluate information from public records and other resources related to a public policy issue. (cont.) Work in groups to analyze an issue and make decisions.

"

INDICATOR 31. Research an issue or topic by gathering, recording, evaluating and interpreting relevant data.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. SM B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a research paper and debate. Resources and Technology: rubric on both, Writers Inc., Turnitin.com 21st Century Skills: Time management skills, Information Literacy, Critical thinking

32. Build consensus within a group by: a. Finding points of agreement; b. Identifying points individuals are willing to concede; c. Making sure that all voices are heard; d. Attempting to understand the view of others. 33. Engage in group work on issues-analysis and decision-making: a. Identify a problem or dilemma; b. Analyze the interests, values and points of view; c. Identify causes of the problem or dilemma; d. Propose alternative solutions; e. Formulate a position or course of action; f. Evaluate the consequences of the action taken.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

SM D 12.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will work cooperatively on topics of discussion. Resources and Technology: http://www.infohio.org/er/secure/ebsco.asp , http://ars.sirs.com/denied?sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-portal-res%3Fid=SOH1360-0-9999 , http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/chag15532 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/collaboration, Leadership skills, Interpersonal skills

SM D 12.7

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete critical thinking scenarios. Resources and Technology: http://www.infohio.org/er/secure/ebsco.asp , http://ars.sirs.com/denied?sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-portal-res%3Fid=SOH1360-0-9999 , http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/chag15532 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills, Academic learning skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

198

ECONOMICS

199

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Explain patterns of historical continuity and change by challenging arguments of historical inevitability.

"

Use historical interpretations to explain current issues.

INDICATOR 1. Evaluate the limitations and the opportunities that result from decisions made in the past including: a. Electoral College; b. Direct election of senators; c. Income tax; d. Length of terms of elected and appointed officials. 2. Challenge arguments of historical inevitability by giving examples of how different choices could have led to different consequences (e.g., choices made during the Civil War, choices relating to immigration policy, or choices made during the Cuban Missile Crisis). 3. Analyze primary source material to see if a historical interpretation is supported.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

H A 11.1

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role that special interest groups play in election processes and how they affect government spending. Resources and Technology: http://www.leg.state.mn.us/lrl/links/special.asp 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

H A 12.1

Lesson ideas:  Students will be able to take historical economic decisions and be asked whether they agree with the decisions. Resources and Technology: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amlawith 21st Century Skills: creativity

H B 12.2

Lesson ideas:  The students will be able to look at certain economic primary documents and make corrections based on what they know now. Resources and Technology: http://www.lib.washington.edu/subject/History/RUSA/ 21st Century Skills: problem-solving

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Analyze how issues 4. Choose a government policy may be viewed or program and analyze how it differently by various has affected and been received cultural groups. by one or more racial, ethnic or religious groups: a. Indian policies; b. Immigration laws; c. Segregation policies; d. Selective service laws. Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS A 11.1

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role the Patriot Act plays in labor and discuss the role that immigrants play in the work force. Students will determine the role of the minimum wage. Resources and Technology: http://www.aclu.org/safefree/resources/17343res20031114.html 21st Century Skills: interpersonal skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

200

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze how issues may be viewed differently by various cultural groups. (cont.) "

Identify the causes of political, economic and social oppression and analyze ways individuals, organizations and countries respond to resulting conflicts. "

"

INDICATOR 5. Identify the perspectives of diverse cultural groups when analyzing current issues.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. PS A 12.1

Lesson ideas:  Student will discuss current economic issues on a daily basis with use of Interactive Technology and internet. Resources and Technology: http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/

6. Analyze proposed solutions to current issues from the perspectives of diverse cultural groups.

PS A 12.2

7. Identify causes of prejudice and demonstrate ways in which legal protections (including constitutional amendments and civil rights legislation) prevent and reduce discrimination.

PS B 11.2

8. Identify and analyze governmental policies that enable individuals of different cultures to participate in the U.S. society and economy including: a. Naturalization; b. Voting rights; c. Racial integration; d. Affirmative action. 9. Analyze ways countries and organizations respond to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity (e.g., English only/bilingual education, theocracies/religious freedom, immigration quotas/open immigration policy, single-sex schools/coeducation).

PS B 11.3

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

21st Century Skills: academic/learning Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss current employment procedures dealing with different ethnic groups. Resources and Technology: http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/ 21st Century Skills: academic/learning Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role that the government has played in protecting laborers (Employment Act of 1946 and other child labor laws). Resources and Technology: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1272/is_n2618_v125/ai_18856940 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

Lesson ideas:  Students will be assigned groups to research each issue and look at how that issue has impacted the US economy now and historically. Students will also be required to look at other countries economies and how they have dealt with them. Resources and Technology: http://www.whitehouse.gov/ 21st Century Skills: teamwork/collaboration

PS B 12.3

Lesson ideas:  Students should discuss the impact that international conflicts have on the prices of products as well as the US dependency on the world for labor and materials. Resources and Technology: http://www.whitehouse.gov/ 21st Century Skills: academic/learning

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

201

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Identify the causes of political, economic and social oppression and analyze ways individuals, organizations and countries respond to resulting conflicts. (cont.)

10. Evaluate the effectiveness of international governmental organizations (e.g., United Nations, European Union, World Court and Organization of American States), multinational corporations, and nongovernmental organizations (e.g., Amnesty International, Red Cross and World Council of Churches) in the global arena.

PS B 12.4

Explain the role of diverse cultural institutions in shaping American society.

11. Explain how the United States has been affected politically, economically and socially by its multicultural diversity (e.g., work force, new ideas and perspectives, and modifications to culture).

PS C 11.4

12. Evaluate the role of institutions in guiding, transmitting, preserving and changing culture.

PS C 12.5

"

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson ideas:  Students will compare and contrast the different currencies of the world, why each of them is in the position that they are, and where they will be in the future. Resources and Technology: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

Lesson ideas:  Students will compare and contrast US today with the past (50 years, 25 years). They will create a chart with the pros and cons of having multicultural diversity in the US. Resources and Technology: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb3463/is_199801/ai_n8242904 21st Century Skills: flexibility

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role of cultures in economics and how these roles have changed over time. Students will also analyze how international business has changed our economy. Resources and Technology: http://www.international-business-center.com/ 21st Century Skills: academic/learning

GEOGRAPHY Evaluate the consequences of geographic and environmental changes resulting from governmental policies and human modifications to the physical environment.

13. Analyze and evaluate the consequences of a governmental policy that affects the physical characteristics of a place or region.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

GEO B 11.2

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role that minimum wage and labor union policies play in attracting business/industries to a particular place. Resources and Technology: http://www.progressiveu.org/205840-why-labor-unions-want-to-raiseminimum-wage 21st Century Skills: multicultural skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

202

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Evaluate the consequences of geographic and environmental changes resulting from governmental policies and human modifications to the physical environment. (cont.) "

ECONOMICS Analyze how scarcity of productive resources affects supply, demand, inflation and economic choices. "

"

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

14. Describe the intended and unintended effects of human modifications to the physical environment and weigh the costs and benefits of alternative approaches to addressing environmental concerns (e.g., alternative sources of energy,

GEO B 12.2

15. Analyze policies and programs for natural resource use and management considering possible trade-offs between environmental quality and economic growth.

GEO B 12.3

16. Explain the effects of shortages, surpluses and government-enforced controls on prices.

E A 11.1

Lesson ideas:  Students will be able to list and discuss current environmental/green techniques people are using to be eco-friendly and create a list of what must be sacrificed. Additionally, they will create a list of what other countries use and the sacrifices/effects it has had on them. Resources and Technology: http://es.epa.gov/ncer/science/tse/ 21st Century Skills: creativity

Lesson ideas:  Students will be given list of natural resources and how we could live without them. Students will create a list of resources that the US is dependent on, the effect our dependency has on the environment and possible alternatives. Resources and Technology: http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?navtype=SUandnavid=NATURAL_RESOURCES 21st Century Skills: creativity Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role that supply and demand plays on shortages and surplus with the use of charts, graphs, PowerPoint presentations, and Interactive Technology presentations. Students will discuss how price ceilings and basements affect prices. Resources and Technology: http://www.energy.gov/about/timeline2002.htm

17. Explain ways that people respond to incentives when allocating their scarce resources in their roles as producers, consumers, savers, workers and investors. 18. Explain the impact of inflation on economic behavior.

E A 11.2

21st Century Skills: academic/learning Lesson ideas:  Students will be given certain resources and must assume the role of a producer, consumer, saver, worker, and investor. Students will explain how that given resource affects them and their lives. Students will also look at the same info from another country’s perspective. 21st Century Skills: problem-solving

E A 11.3

Lesson ideas:  Students will use multiple PowerPoint/Interactive Technology presentations to show the effect inflation has on people as well as the global economy (use specific products like oil as examples). Resources and Technology: http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?navtype=SUandnavid=NATURAL_RESOURCES 21st Century Skills: academic/learning

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

203

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze how scarcity of productive resources affects supply, demand, inflation and economic choices. (cont.) "

INDICATOR 19. Compare how values and beliefs influence economic decisions in different communities.

20. Explain the impact of marginal cost/marginal benefit analysis on decision-making.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. E A 12.1

Lesson ideas:  Students will compare and contrast economic decision that other countries make in regards to basic economic issues like labor, manufacturing, human rights, etc. Resources and Technology: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html

E A 12.2

21st Century Skills: problem solving Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss how corporation take into account the role of marginal cost and where choose to locate their manufacturing base to meet those goals (discuss role that international business plays in these decisions). Resources and Technology: http://www.econmodel.com/classic/terms/mc.htm

"

Identify factors which inhibit or spur economic growth and cause expansions or recessions.

"

21. Select a current issue; identify the costs and benefits of various choices to determine the impact of personal and social economic decisions on the allocation of productive resources. 22. Describe the functions of the components that make up an economic system and describe the relationships among them including: a. Business; b. Productive resources; c. Financial institutions; d. Government; e. Consumers. 23. Identify factors that cause changes in economic growth including the effects of supply and demand on the labor market.

E A 12.3

21st Century Skills: academic/learning Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss Wal-Mart Corporation and the role they play regarding international business and companies and their overseas production. The use of videos will expose students to these issues. Resources and Technology: http://www.walmartstores.com/GlobalWMStoresWeb/navigate.do?catg=217 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

E B 11.4

Lesson ideas:  Students will create a business plan after considering the identified factors. Students should create a plan integrating globalization. Resources and Technology: http://www.sba.gov/smallbusinessplanner/index.html 21st Century Skills: teamwork/collaboration

E B 11.5

Lesson ideas:  Student will consider China as an example in a discussion of supply and demand of labor, defining the role that it plays in wages and the decision of corporations to move their operations overseas. Resources and Technology: http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?navtype=SUandnavid=NATURAL_RESOURCES 21st Century Skills: work ethic

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

204

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify factors which inhibit or spur economic growth and cause expansions or recessions. (cont.)

"

Explain how voluntary worldwide trade, specialization and interdependence among countries affect standards of living and economic growth. "

INDICATOR 24. Identify indicators that provide information to consumers on the current value or purchasing power of money with a focus on the: a. Consumer Price Index; b. Unemployment rate; c. Gross Domestic Product (GDP). 25. Use the circular flow model to explain the flow of money, goods, services and productive resources in the economy.

26. Explain how countries use their comparative advantage to produce goods and services for trade with other countries.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. E B 11.6

Lesson ideas:  Students will compare and contrast major countries in all of these categories with the use of charts and graphs. Students will discuss why each of them has the strengths and weakness that they do. Students will make educated predictions where they see these numbers going in the future. Resources and Technology: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

E B 12.4

Lesson ideas:  Students will present an example of the flow model and discuss how international business has altered or changed the model. Resources and Technology: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/toc/04_33/B3896magazine.htm

E C 11.7

21st Century Skills: teamwork/collaboration Lesson ideas:  Show a chart of the global GDP and discuss why each country has certain advantages and disadvantages in this situation. Resources and Technology: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP) 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

27. Explain the effects of specialization, interdependence and trade on the United States and other countries.

E C 11.8

Lesson ideas:  Students will identify certain industries and determine why they are flourishing globally, while not in the US. Students will discuss how the countries have become interdependent (Use certain products to demonstrate this). Resources and Technology: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/toc/04_33/B3896magazine.htm

"

28. Explain how changes in exchange rates affect consumers and producers.

E C 11.9

21st Century Skills: critical thinking Lesson ideas:  Students will analyze charts comparing the US dollar against other currencies, why the exchange rates vary and how this might affect both the United States and global economies. Students will predict the direction the exchange rate might move in the future. Resources and Technology: http://www.oanda.com/ 21st Century Skills: problem solving

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

205

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how voluntary worldwide trade, specialization and interdependence among countries affect standards of living and economic growth. (cont.)

Analyze the role of fiscal and regulatory policies in a mixed economy.

"

Analyze the role of fiscal and regulatory policies in a mixed economy. (cont.)

Explain the use of a budget in making personal economic decisions and planning for the future.

INDICATOR 29. Identify reasons for and the impacts of multinational economic organizations: a. Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC); b. European Monetary Union; c. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA); d. World Trade Organization (WTO); e. World Bank. 30. Analyze issues related to the use of different types of taxes to fund public goods and services including: a. Proportional tax; b. Progressive tax; c. Regressive tax. 31. Analyze economic policy decisions made by governments that have resulted in intended and unintended consequences.

E C 12.5

32. Identify public policies that may cost more than the benefits they generate, assess who enjoys the benefits, who bears the cost and explain why the policies exist. 33. Explain why incomes will differ in the labor market depending on supply and demand for skills, abilities and education levels.

E D 12.7

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role that multinational economic organizations have had on the global as well as the US economy. Students must rank organizations in order of their importance on the US and world economies and then discuss results. Resources and Technology: http://www.wto.org/ 21st Century Skills: teamwork/collaboration

E D 11.10

Lesson ideas:  Students will be divided into groups. Students will debate which one is the best alternative. Resources and Technology: http://www.ncpa.org/pi/taxes/tax7.html 21st Century Skills: teamwork/collaboration

E D 12.6

Lesson ideas:  Students select certain industries in the US and discuss how government assists or hinders them (minimum wage, tariffs, illegal immigrants, etc). Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/ 21st Century Skills: creativity Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role that certain government programs may play and their impact on taxpayers (compare with other countries and programs they use). Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/

E E 11.11

21st Century Skills: academic/learning Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss labor costs in US and other countries. They will identify why these factors play a role in income earned and true value of income. Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/ 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

206

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain the use of a budget in making personal economic decisions and planning for the future. (cont.) "

"

INDICATOR 34. Explain the role of individuals in the economy as producers, consumers, savers, workers and investors.

35. Explain the consequences of the economic choices made by individuals and the tools which they use to manage their financial resources including: a. Budgets; b. Savings; c. Investments; d. Credit; e. Philanthropy. 36. Describe how interest rates affect savers and borrowers.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. E E 11.12

Lesson ideas:  Students will assume the role of each of these topics both in the US and another country. Students will discuss the identified differences. Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/

E E 11.13

21st Century Skills: creativity Lesson ideas:  Students will divide up monetary amounts among the categories and defend the allocations. Students will use The Automatic Millionaire as the blueprint for this activity. Resources and Technology: Automatic Millionaire 21st Century Skills: organization

E E 11.14

Lesson ideas:  Students will define interest rates and list the affects on consumers. Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/ 21st Century Skills: academic/learning

GOVERNMENT Evaluate, take and defend positions about issues concerning the alignment of the characteristics of American democracy with realities in the United States today. "

37. Identify and analyze an issue related to domestic or foreign policy in the United States (e.g., human rights, intervention in conflicts between other countries, or health care).

GVT A 12.1

38. Explain how individuals and groups, both governmental and non-governmental, influence domestic and foreign policy and evaluate how these actions reflect characteristics of American democracy.

GVT A 12.2

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss how the US relates with other countries regarding how they treat their citizens and the role that plays with business interests of the US (China is good example). Resources and Technology: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html 21st Century Skills: teamwork/collaboration

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss the role that US and the US government has in the global economics in regards to how they protect individuals’ rights and how they protect American businesses. Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/ 21st Century Skills: academic/learning

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

207

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze how citizens participate in the election process in the United States.

INDICATOR 39. Explain the use of the initiative and referendum in the government of Ohio.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. GVT C 11.13

Lesson ideas:  Students will utilize a current event to provide an example of referendum in Ohio government. Resources and Technology: http://www.ohio.gov/ 21st Century Skills: self motivation

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Evaluate various 40. Choose an effective method means for citizens to of citizen participation in the take action on a policy process and identify the particular issue. level of government and person or agency with jurisdiction for a particular set of circumstances. " 41. Practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens of a democratic republic: a. Persuasive speech; b. Panel discussion; c. Debate. " 42. Evaluate policies that have been proposed as ways of dealing with social changes resulting from new technologies (e.g., censorship of the media, intellectual property rights, or organ donation). "

43. Analyze relationships and tensions between national sovereignty and international accords and organizations (e.g., international agreements on environmental issues, trade agreements, arms agreements, European Union or NATO).

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CRR A 11.2

Lesson ideas:  Students will take a particular economic cause and explain how they would deal with the issue (boycott, strike, etc). Resources and Technology: http://www.ohio.gov/

CRR A 12.1

21st Century Skills: creativity/critical thinking Lesson ideas:  Students will debate current economic issues, domestic or international. Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation/initiative

CRR A 12.2

Lesson ideas:  Students will explain the role of technology in everyday life. Students will create lists of what may affect our lives in the future. Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation/initiative

CRR A 12.3

Lesson ideas:  Students will create a list of international trade organizations and agreements and discuss their role. Students will predict where these agreements will be in 20 years. Resources and Technology: http://www.wto.org/ 21st Century Skills: creativity/critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

208

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Evaluate various means for citizens to take action on a particular issue. (cont.) "

"

"

"

Explain how the exercise of a citizen’s rights and responsibilities helps to strengthen a democracy.

INDICATOR 44. Explain and demonstrate knowledge of federal and Ohio freedom of information and open meeting laws. 45. Explain how to file a request for public information using either the appropriate federal or Ohio freedom of information statute. 46. Prepare a plan of action that defines a community issue and suggest alternative solutions or courses of action based on appropriate criteria. 47. Analyze the causes, consequences and possible solutions to persistent, contemporary and emerging world problems (e.g., health, security, resource allocation, economic development or environmental quality). 48. Analyze how democracy, the free flow of information, global economic interdependence, or human rights movements can cause change within a country. 49. Compare the rights of citizens and resident aliens.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. CRR A 12.4

CRR A 12.5

Lesson ideas:  Using the internet, students will research a current business issue and describe its significance. Resources and Technology: http://www.wto.org/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation/initiative Lesson ideas:  The student will be able to actually fill out a request for the information dealing with a current economic issue. Resources and Technology: http://www.ohio.gov/

CRR A 12.6

CRR A 12.7

21st Century Skills: critical thinking Lesson ideas:  The student will create a business plan for a community issue and submit it to the proper entity. Resources and Technology: http://www.ohio.gov/ 21st Century Skills: critical thinking Lesson ideas:  The student will select a current world problem, research and present to the class possible solutions to the problem. The class will rank the problems. Resources and Technology: http://www.wto.org/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

CRR A 12.8

Lesson ideas:  Students will discuss how the US has become dependent on foreign countries. Students will create a list of all the things the US must import from foreign countries and things that foreign countries import from us. Students will create a list of ways of lessening our interdependence. Resources and Technology: http://www.commerce.gov/

CRR B 11.4

21st Century Skills: academic Lesson ideas:  Students will divide into two groups (legal residence, illegal residences). They will look at roles that both play in our economy. In a collective bargaining situation they will compromise on a solution. Resources and Technology: http://www.whitehouse.gov/ 21st Century Skills: creative thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

209

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Explain how the exercise of a citizen’s rights and responsibilities helps to strengthen a democracy. (cont.)

"

INDICATOR 50. Explain the meaning and importance of each of the rights guaranteed under the Bill of Rights and how they are secured through: a. Legislation; b. The role of the judiciary in upholding rights; c. The role of citizens exercising their rights. 51. Compare elements, proceedings and decisions related to the right to a fair trial in criminal and civil courts and describe alternatives to litigation for maintaining order and resolving conflicts within the U.S. legal system including: a. Mediation; b. Arbitration; c. Alternative dispute resolution; d. Plea-bargaining.

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain and evaluate 52. Identify a current public information from policy issue and arguments public records and relative to the issue. other resources related to a public policy issue. "

53. Identify advocacy groups and obtain public policy information they produce.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. CRR B 11.5

Lesson ideas:  Students will select and research one of our rights provided in the Bill of Rights. They will provide a historical overview of the relevance of this right in a presentation to the class. Resources and Technology: http://www.wto.org/ 21st Century Skills: teamwork

CRR B 12.9

Lesson ideas:  The students will be assigned scenarios and after research, they will present to the class how they would deal with mediation, arbitration, alternative resolution, and plea- bargaining. Resources and Technology: http://www.adr.org/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

SM A 11.1

Lesson ideas:  Provide the student with current economic issues and after researching the issue, have them discuss. Resources and Technology: www.USA.com 21st Century Skills: critical thinking

SM A 11.3

Lesson ideas:  Using the internet for research, the students will identify advocacy groups based on an area of interest. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

210

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Obtain and evaluate information from public records and other resources related to a public policy issue. (cont.) "

Critique data and information to determine the adequacy of support for conclusions. "

"

"

INDICATOR 54. Adjust a research question or topic based on information obtained while conducting research.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. SM A 11.4

Lesson ideas:  Using the internet for research, students will clarify a research question or topic. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation.

55. Obtain and evaluate information from public records and other resources related to a public policy issue. 56. Choose a position on an issue and develop a rationale for that position.

SM A 12.1

SM B 11.5

Lesson ideas:  The students will use the Ohio and Federal websites to find pertinent public policy information. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation Lesson ideas:  The students will select a current economic issue and, using the internet for research, develop an argument in support of the issue. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/

57. Critique the conclusions drawn from survey and research data by questioning: a. Sample size; b. Demographics; c. The sponsoring organization; d. Logic of the conclusions reached.

SM B 11.6

58. Construct an action plan for presenting a position to the appropriate decision-making body.

SM B 12.2

59. Research an issue or topic by gathering, recording, evaluating and interpreting relevant data.

21st Century Skills: self-motivation Lesson ideas:  Students will analyze one survey or research project, identifying sample size, demographics, sponsoring organization and logic of conclusion. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

SM B 12.3

Lesson ideas:  After research, students will create a plan addressing their position on a current economic issue. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation Lesson ideas:  The student will complete a research project on current economic issues. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

211

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Develop a research project that identifies the various perspectives on an issue and explain a resolution of that issue. "

"

Work in groups to analyze an issue and make decisions.

"

INDICATOR 60. Identify appropriate tools for communicating a position on an issue (e.g., electronic resources, newsletters, letters to the editor, public displays and handouts).

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. SM C 11.7

Lesson ideas:  The students will use each of the following (electronic resources, newsletter, letters to the editor, etc) and present a report to the class about a current economic topic. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

61. Develop a research project and make formal presentations to the class and/or community members using: a. Key terms; b. Support for main ideas; c. Examples; d. Statistics and other evidence; e. Visual aids; f. Formal citation of sources. 62. Respond to questions and feedback about presentations knowledgeably and civilly

SM C 12.4

Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

SM C 12.5

63. Apply the processes of persuasion, compromise and negotiation to the resolution of conflicts and differences.

SM D 11.8

64. Build consensus within a group by: a. Finding points of agreement; b. Identifying points individuals are willing to concede; c. Making sure that all voices are heard; d. Attempting to understand the view of others.

SM D 12.6

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson ideas:  The students will be assigned an economic problem/issue to research and present to a group of staff and/or community members.

Lesson ideas:  The students will field questions after their presentations in a Q and A forum. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation Lesson ideas:  The students will role play different economic conflicts using the techniques of collective bargaining. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation Lesson ideas:  The students will role play different economic conflicts using the techniques of collective bargaining. Resources and Technology: http://clear.uhwo.hawaii.edu/CB-FAQ.html 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

212

SOCIAL STUDIES ECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Work in groups to analyze an issue and make decisions. (cont.)

INDICATOR 65. Engage in group work on issues-analysis and decisionmaking: a. Identify a problem or dilemma; b. Analyze the interests, values and points of view; c. Identify causes of the problem or dilemma; d. Propose alternative solutions; e. Formulate a position or course of action; f. Evaluate the consequences of the action taken.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. SM D 12.7

Lesson ideas:  The students will be assigned a global economic problem, research the topic and present to the class using any technological tool. Resources and Technology: http://www.csuchico.edu/~kfountain/ 21st Century Skills: self-motivation

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

213

SOCIOLOGY

214

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Explain patterns of historical continuity and change by challenging arguments of historical inevitability.

Use historical interpretations to explain current issues.

"

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

1. Challenge arguments of historical inevitability by giving examples of how different choices could have led to different consequences (e.g., choices made during the Civil War, choices relating to immigration policy, or choices made during the Cuban Missile Crisis). 2. Analyze primary source material to see if a historical interpretation is supported.

H A 12.1

3. Analyze cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation including the influence of ideas, the role of chance and individual and collective action.

H B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare and contrast how the three broad theoretical perspectives of functionalist, conflict, and interactionist, guide Sociologists’ work and help interpret their findings. Technology and Resources: http://www.soci.canterbury.ac.nz/resources/glossary/conflicp.shtml , http://www.delmar.edu/socsci/rlong/intro/perspect.htm , http://web.grinnell.edu/courses/soc/s00/soc11101/IntroTheories/IntroTheoriesIndex.html 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and Problem Solving skills, Academic/learning skills

H B 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze primary source reading segments. Technology and Resources: articles such as, The Sociological Imagination C. Wright Mills, “Cyberpunk” by McKenzie Wark, The Sacred Cow and the Abominable Pig by Marvin Harris 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and Problem Solving skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will identify the basic research methods that sociologists employ to collect data, or scientific information, on society and human behavior. Technology and Resources: http://www.ed.gov/index.jhtml, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/nvsr/nvsr.htm , http://www.monitoringthefuture.org/ , http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking and Problem-solving skills

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Analyze how issues 4. Choose a government policy may be viewed or program and analyze how it differently by various has affected and been received cultural groups. by one or more racial, ethnic or religious groups: a. Indian policies; b. Immigration laws; c. Segregation policies; d. Selective service laws. Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS A 11.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will compare: values and norms from country to country, gender roles from the past fifty years, interview parents/grandparents to determine which traditions they have practiced compared to current practice. Technology and Resources: Interviews with parents and grandparents 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, Information Literacy, Academic/learning skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

215

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze how issues may be viewed differently by various cultural groups. (cont.)

INDICATOR 5. Identify the perspectives of diverse cultural groups when analyzing current issues.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. PS A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will share weekly current event articles on chapter topics. Technology and Resources: Newsweek, Plain Dealer, News-Herald, http://www.chagrinfalls.k12.oh.us/cfhs/library/researchdatabases.htm 21st Century Skills: Self-motivation initiative, Critical thinking, Multicultural skills

"

6. Analyze proposed solutions to current issues from the perspectives of diverse cultural groups.

PS A 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will discuss how having different values and norms can bring about different ways of dealing with issues. Technology and Resources: http://www.propositionsonline.com/html/what_are_american_values_.html , http://www.tolerance.org/hidden_bias/index.html , http://www.cnn.com/studentnews/ 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, Interpersonal skills, Problem-solving

Identify the causes of political, economic and social oppression and analyze ways individuals, organizations and countries respond to resulting conflicts.

7. Identify causes of prejudice and demonstrate ways in which legal protections (including constitutional amendments and civil rights legislation) prevent and reduce discrimination.

PS B 11.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a multicultural awareness survey. The survey illustrates how perceptions of reality, and the “facts” we are taught through the media, the education system, and other sources of information, are often limited in depth or simply wrong.  Students will analyze “A Continuum of Intergroup Relations” and give examples of acceptance and rejection patterns of minority group treatment. Technology and Resources: http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/quiz/quiz.doc 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning skills, Multicultural skills, Critical thinking

"

8. Identify and analyze governmental policies that enable individuals of different cultures to participate in the U.S. society and economy including: a. Naturalization; b. Voting rights; c. Racial integration; d. Affirmative action.

PS B 11.3

Lesson Ideas:  While examining the chapter on Cultural Conformity and Adaptation, students will write a short essay, using the civil rights movement as an example, demonstrating how changes in values and beliefs can bring about changes in government policy.  Give examples from history of how patterns of minority group treatment and inter-group relations include legal protection. Technology and Resources: http://web.ebscohost.com/src/results?vid=3&hid=116&sid=a00dbd1e-617e-46c0a3a7-6e552bff64c2%40sessionmgr107 , http://student.britannica.com/comptons/article-204749/minority-groups 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills, Flexibility adaptability

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

216

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify the causes of political, economic and social oppression and analyze ways individuals, organizations and countries respond to resulting conflicts. (cont.) "

Explain the role of diverse cultural institutions in shaping American society.

"

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

9. Analyze ways countries and organizations respond to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity (e.g., English only/bilingual education, theocracies/religious freedom, immigration quotas/open immigration policy, single-sex schools/coeducation). 10. Evaluate the effectiveness of international governmental organizations (e.g., United Nations, European Union, World Court and Organization of American States), multinational corporations, and nongovernmental organizations (e.g., Amnesty International, Red Cross and World Council of Churches) in the global arena.

PS B 12.3

11. Explain how the United States has been affected politically, economically and socially by its multicultural diversity (e.g., work force, new ideas and perspectives, and modifications to culture).

PS C 11.4

12. Evaluate the role of institutions in guiding, transmitting, preserving and changing culture.

PS C 12.5

Lesson Ideas:  Research papers and debates on opposing viewpoints topics are required of students as part of this course. Technology and Resources: Writers Inc. and turnitin.com 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/collaboration, Leadership skills, Critical thinking

PS B 12.4

Lesson Ideas:  Students will share and discuss weekly-required current event articles. Technology and Resources: Newsweek, Plain Dealer, News-Herald, http://www.chagrinfalls.k12.oh.us/cfhs/library/researchdatabases.htm 21st Century Skills: Self-motivation initiative, Critical thinking, Multicultural skills

Lesson Ideas:  Guest speaker: international business.  Students will discuss the issue of how hiring individuals from diverse cultures can benefit a business. Technology and Resources: Making Differences Matter: A New Paradigm for Managing Diversity, Dr. David A. Thomas 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, Critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Students will evaluate the importance of “cultural pluralism” and “mixed salad” vs. “melting pot” in American society. Technology and Resources: http://www.tolerance.cz/courses/texts/melting.htm , http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/national/longterm/meltingpot/meltingpot.htm 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, Critical thinking

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

217

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK GEOGRAPHY Explain how the character and meaning of a place reflect a society’s economics, politics, social values, ideology and culture. Evaluate the consequences of geographic and environmental changes resulting from governmental policies and human modifications to the physical environment. "

Use appropriate data sources and geographic tools to analyze and evaluate public policies. "

INDICATOR 13. Explain how government decisions reflect a society’s values about land use (e.g., zoning, park development or toxic waste disposal).

14. Analyze and evaluate the consequences of a governmental policy that affects the physical characteristics of a place or region.

REF.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

GEO A 11.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze and share their opinions about the relationships between American cultural values and the purposes and policies of the U.S. government while examining the chapter on The Economy and Politics. Technology and Resources: http://www.fas.usda.gov/itp /Policy/NAFTA/nafta.asp , http://www.udel.edu/htr/Psc105/Texts/power.html

GEO B 11.2

21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will use provided internet links to conduct research on the ways in which different organizations are managing the effects of modernization. Students will write a profile of one specific organization. To help guide students, they will be provided with a sample profile of an organization of your choice to use as a template. Technology and Resources: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ , http://www.asu.edu/clas/nacts/bna/teaching/studer.pdf , http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2005/09/b1037455.html

15. Analyze policies and programs for natural resource use and management considering possible trade-offs between environmental quality and economic growth. 16. Compare and evaluate alternative public policies for the use of land and natural resources at all levels of government. 17. Use appropriate data sources and tools to gather, manipulate, interpret and communicate geographic information related to civic/global issues.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

GEO B 12.3

21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Creativity, Work ethic/dependability Lesson Ideas:  Students will read textbook and a few opposing viewpoint position papers on how American environmental values have changed. Technology and Resources: http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=5556 , http://www.brainerd.org/downloads/ecoAmerica%20AEVS%20Summary.pdf

GEO C 11.3

GEO C 12.4

21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will examine charts and graphs related to population and urban life. Technology and Resources: http://www.prb.org/ , http://www.census.gov/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic learning skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will review the concepts of mode, the mean, and the median. Technology and Resources: handout on mode, mean and median: measures of central tendency 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic learning skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

218

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK ECONOMICS Analyze how scarcity of productive resources affects supply, demand, inflation and economic choices.

INDICATOR 18. Compare how values and beliefs influence economic decisions in different communities.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

E A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will describe the Malthusian theory and demographic transition theory in terms of how each one views population change. What criticisms have been directed at each of these theories? Technology and Resources: http://cepa.newschool.edu/~het/profiles/malthus.htm , http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-60686/population , http://www.arcytech.org/java/population/popintro.html 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills, Academic/learning skills

"

Identify factors that inhibit or spur economic growth and cause expansions or recessions.

"

19. Select a current issue; identify the costs and benefits of various choices to determine the impact of personal and social economic decisions on the allocation of productive resources.

E A 12.3

20. Describe the functions of the components that make up an economic system and describe the relationships among them including: a. Business; b. Productive resources; c. Financial institutions; d. Government; e. Consumers

E B 11.4

21. Identify factors that cause changes in economic growth including the effects of supply and demand on the labor market.

E B 11.5

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a personal budget for the average income of a household in the community and do the same for a household living at the poverty level. Students will compare the two and report their findings. Technology and Resources: 2 blank personal budget sheets, http://www.census.gov/ , http://povertycenter.cwru.edu/ 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Work ethic/dependability, Multicultural skills Lesson Ideas:  When analyzing the economic institution in sociology, students will discuss how the different economic models of capitalism and socialism compare. Technology and Resources: http://www.lib.umich.edu/govdocs/foreign.html ,http://www.cesj.org/thirdway/comparison3rdway.htm 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning skills, Interpersonal skills

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research Adam Smith’s impact on capitalist thinking. Technology and Resources: http://www.adamsmith.org.uk/smith/quotes.htm , http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/commandingheights/shared/minitext/prof_adamsmith.html 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

219

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Identify factors that inhibit or spur economic growth and cause expansions or recessions. (cont.)

Explain how voluntary worldwide trade, specialization and interdependence among countries affect standards of living and economic growth.

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INDICATOR 22. Identify indicators that provide information to consumers on the current value or purchasing power of money with a focus on the: a. Consumer Price Index; b. Unemployment rate; c. Gross Domestic Product (GDP). 23. Explain how countries use their comparative advantage to produce goods and services for trade with other countries.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. E B 11.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will gain an understanding of employment patterns in society by looking at unemployment. Technology and Resources: http://www.bls.gov/cps/ , http://www.statistics.gov.uk/CCI/nugget.asp?ID=12 21st Century Skills: Creativity, Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills

E C 11.7

Lesson Ideas:  Students will write a short story set in a future in which market forces have joined together the countries of the world under one global economy. Stories should address broad themes, such as the nature of the economic system, national identity, trade, currency, languages, education, politics, and an assessment of today’s world order from the point of view of characters in the future. Volunteers will read their stories aloud to the class. Technology and Resources: http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762531.html , http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/EXTDEC/EXTDECPROSPECTS/EXTGBLPROSPECTSAP RIL/0,,menuPK:659178~pagePK:64218926~piPK:64218953~theSitePK:659149,00.html

24. Explain the effects of specialization, interdependence and trade on the United States and other countries.

E C 11.8

21st Century Skills: Work ethic/dependability, Creativity, Multicultural skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will write two or three paragraphs on how globalization of the economy and technology has affected the nature of work in the U.S. Students should consider competition from workers in foreign countries along with positive and negative effects on workers. Technology and Resources: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2004/el2004-12.html , http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/about/pdfs/globalization_challenge.pdf 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills

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25. Explain how changes in exchange rates affect consumers and producers.

E C 11.9

Lesson Ideas:  Students will discuss together how decline of the value of the U.S. dollar affects travel patterns, and employment. Technology and Resources: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/12/06/opinion/fenton/main659179.shtml , http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=2483 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills, Multicultural skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

220

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze the role of fiscal and regulatory policies in a mixed economy. (cont.)

GOVERNMENT Evaluate, take and defend positions about issues concerning the alignment of the characteristics of American democracy with realities in the United States today.

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

26. Identify public policies that may cost more than the benefits they generate, assess who enjoys the benefits, who bears the cost and explain why the policies exist.

E D 12.7

27. Analyze the actions of the U.S. government and evaluate the extent to which those actions reflect characteristics of American democracy and help to serve the public good.

GVT A 11.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will attend a city or town council meeting or district board meeting and take notes detailing their observations. Write a newspaper article covering the meeting and any decisions made at the meeting. Technology and Resources: a local council meeting 21st Century Skills: Work ethic/dependability, Organization skills, Problem-solving skills Lesson Ideas:  Have each student create a “recipe for American Value Pie”. Students should use the values discussed in our book as the ingredients. Rank the values, based on importance, to determine ingredient amounts. Students should also provide creative preparation instructions. Technology and Resources: http://www.propositionsonline.com/html/what_are_american_values_.html , http://web.ebscohost.com/src/results?vid=2&hid=3&sid=058bd4ad-db41-4ce1-a075d555574b8a4c%40sessionmgr2 21st Century Skills: Creativity, Academic/learning skills, Organization skills

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28. Explain, using examples, how the media and individuals influence the policy agenda and decision-making of government institutions.

GVT A 11.2

Lesson Ideas:  When discussing Racial and Ethnic Relations, students will discuss Swedish sociologist Gunnar Myrdal’s “an American dilemma” conclusion.  Students will demonstrate how they think new communication technologies have changed the norms and behaviors of certain groups in the United States? How has individual and societal behavior changed because of these new technologies? Technology and Resources: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/economics/laureates/1974/myrdal-bio.html , Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center, on technology 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills

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29. Identify and analyze an issue related to domestic or foreign policy in the United States (e.g., human rights, intervention in conflicts between other countries, or health care).

GVT A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will debate and complete research papers on identified issues.  Students will research and discuss weekly current event articles. Technology and Resources: http://www.chagrin-falls.k12.oh.us/cfhs/library/researchdatabases.htm , http://www.turnitin.com/static/index.html, daily news print 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Time management skills, Organization skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

221

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

Evaluate, take and defend positions about issues concerning the alignment of the characteristics of American democracy with realities in the United States today. (cont.) Explain how the U.S. Constitution has evolved including its philosophical foundations, amendments and court interpretations.

30. Explain how individuals and groups, both governmental and non-governmental, influence domestic and foreign policy and evaluate how these actions reflect characteristics of American democracy.

GVT A 12.2

31. Explain the philosophical foundations of the American political system as outlined in the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Federalist Papers with emphasis on the basic principles of natural rights.

GVT B 11.7

"

32. Explain how interpretations of the basic principles found in the U.S. Constitution have changed over time.

GVT B 11.9

Lesson Ideas:  Students will evaluate the relationships between American cultural values and the purposes and policies of the U.S. government.  Students will analyze why voter participation varies according to race, age, and education. Technology and Resources: http://www.udel.edu/htr/Psc105/Texts/power.html , http://americanhistory.si.edu/presidency/1_frame.html , http://www.sos.state.oh.us/ 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, Critical thinking, Academic/ learning skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will define how government policies have affected the lives of minority groups in the United States.  Students will compare positive and negative sanctions, (i.e. capital punishment). Technology and Resources: Chagrin Falls High School Student/Parent Handbook, http://www.nmsdcus.org/infocenter/facts%20and%20figures.html , http://www.jointcenter.org/DB/index.htm 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Multicultural skills, Interpersonal skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will write an essay describing how new values of your generation will affect aspects of American life. The essay should consider the effect of American values on economic decisions, motivations, and aspirations and should also consider the effect of American values on government policies and social institutions. Technology and Resources: http://www.drphil.com/articles/article/299 , http://www.psywww.com/resource/selfhelp.htm 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills

Analyze how citizens participate in the election process in the United States.

33. Explain the role of elections and political parties (including third parties) in facilitating the democratic process.

GVT C 11.11

Lesson Ideas: GVT A 12.2  Students will evaluate the relationships between American cultural values and the purposes and policies of the U.S. government.  Students will analyze why voter participation varies according to race, age, and education. Technology and Resources: : http://www.udel.edu/htr/Psc105/Texts/power.html , http://americanhistory.si.edu/presidency/1_frame.html , http://www.sos.state.oh.us/ 21st Century Skills: Leadership skills, Problem-solving skills, Organizational skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

222

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Evaluate various 34. Analyze historical and means for citizens to contemporary examples of take action on a citizen movements to bring particular issue. about political change (e.g., Mothers Against Drunk Driving [MADD], NOW, Common Cause, NAACP and Eagle Forum). " 35. Choose an effective method of citizen participation in the policy process and identify the level of government and person or agency with jurisdiction for a particular set of circumstances.

"

"

36. Practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens of a democratic republic: a. Persuasive speech; b. Panel discussion; c. Debate. 37. Evaluate policies that have been proposed as ways of dealing with social changes resulting from new technologies (e.g., censorship of the media, intellectual property rights, or organ donation).

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

CRR A 11.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will describe how the sources of social change can affect society.  In groups students will discuss how ethnocentrism, cultural lag, and vested interests produce resistance to social change in an educational setting. Share your discussion with the class. Technology and Resources: http://www.madd.org/ , http://www.now.org/ , http://www.commoncause.org/site/pp.asp?c=dkLNK1MQIwG&b=186966

CRR A 11.2

21st Century Skills: Interpersonal skills, Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will develop a plan of action that defines a community issue and suggests alternative solutions or courses of action based on established criteria.  Students will critically think about case studies presented on social issues. Technology and Resources: compile issues from local newspaper stories and community survey, 100% American by Ralph Linton, The Function of Fairy Tales by Bruno Bettelheim

CRR A 12.1

21st Century Skills: Time management skills, Problem-solving skills, Information Literacy Lesson Ideas:  Students will take part in persuasive speeches, panel discussions, and debates (all are requirements of this course). Technology and Resources: Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center, http://find.galegroup.com/srcx/start.do?prodId=SRC-1&userGroupName=chag15532 21st Century Skills: Organization skills, Time management skills, Problem-solving skills

CRR A 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will draw conclusions and infer how norms and behaviors of subculture groups change because of advances in science and technology.  Students will identify cause and effect of cultural changes and technology-cultural diffusion, and reformulation. Technology and Resources: http://find.galegroup.com/srcx/basicSearch.do;jsessionid=5A989566EBB5826D68CBEFFBDC149C3B , http://www.samurai-archives.com/cde.html 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Creativity, Multicultural skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

223

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Evaluate various means for citizens to take action on a particular issue. (cont.)

INDICATOR 38. Prepare a plan of action that defines a community issue and suggest alternative solutions or courses of action based on appropriate criteria.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. CRR A 12.6

Lesson Ideas: CRR A 11.2  Students will develop a plan of action that defines a community issue and suggests alternative solutions or courses of action based on established criteria.  Students will critically think about case studies presented on social issues. Technology and Resources: compile issues from local newspaper stories and community survey, 100% American by Ralph Linton, The Function of Fairy Tales by Bruno Bettelheim 21st Century Skills: Time management skills, Problem-solving skills, Information Literacy

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39. Analyze the causes, consequences and possible solutions to persistent, contemporary and emerging world problems (e.g., health, security, resource allocation, economic development or environmental quality).

CRR A 12.7

Lesson Ideas:  Students will examine how the nature versus nurture debate shapes public policy and our view of ourselves in such areas as violence, education, and general preference.  Students will read about Doctors Online, Responding to Terrorism, Economics and Immigration, and other contemporary topics, then brainstorm solutions and make generalizations and predictions. Technology and Resources: http://genealogy.about.com/cs/geneticgenealogy/a/nature_nurture.htm , http://www.livescience.com/health/060718_nature_nurture.html 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Academic/learning skills, Problem-solving skills

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40. Analyze how democracy, the free flow of information, global economic interdependence, or human rights movements can cause change within a country.

CRR A 12.8

Lesson Ideas:  Students will write a medium-length feature to appear in a fictional magazine on an anniversary related to events such as WW1, WW2, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, or the September 11 terrorist attacks. The feature should include visuals, such as charts, maps, drawings, or photographs. Technology and Resources: http://america.eb.com/ , http://www.marcopolo-education.org/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Time management skills, Creativity

Explain how the exercise of a citizen’s rights and responsibilities helps to strengthen a democracy.

41. Compare the rights of citizens and resident aliens.

CRR B 11.4

Lesson Ideas:  Students will locate cartoons and share them in cooperative groups. Students will consider if the messages conveyed by the cartoons have anything to do with citizen’s rights and responsibilities? Technology and Resources: http://cagle.msnbc.com/politicalcartoons/ , http://politicalhumor.about.com/library/bldailyfeed2.htm 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Teamwork/collaboration, Critical thinking

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

224

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

Explain how the exercise of a citizen’s rights and responsibilities helps to strengthen a democracy. (cont.)

42. Explain how citizenship includes the exercise of personal responsibility and active participation in a democracy including: a. Behaving in a civil manner; b. Being fiscally responsible; c. Accepting responsibility for the consequences of one’s actions; d. Practicing civil discourse; e. Becoming informed on public issues; f. Voting; g. Taking action on public issues; h. Providing public service; i. Serving on juries. 43. Compare elements, " proceedings and decisions related to the right to a fair trial in criminal and civil courts and describe alternatives to litigation for maintaining order and resolving conflicts within the U.S. legal system including: a. Mediation; b. Arbitration; c. Alternative dispute resolution; d. Plea-bargaining. SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain and evaluate 44. Identify a current public information from policy issue and arguments public records and relative to the issue. other resources related to a public policy issue. Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. CRR B 11.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will identify a conflict that is taking place at school or in the community. Students will write an explanation of how the four approaches of conflict resolution might be used to bring about a satisfactory resolution to the conflict. Students will conclude by discussing which approach is the most effective and why.  Students will locate and read the article “The Saints and the Roughnecks” by William Chambliss. Students will write a brief essay discussing how Chambliss used the control perspective to explain why the Roughnecks were labeled as deviant but the saints were not. Technology and Resources: compile issues from local newspaper stories and community survey, http://phobos.ramapo.edu/~jweiss/laws131/unit1/saints.htm 21st Century Skills: Problem-solving skills, Critical thinking, Work ethic/dependability

CRR B 12.9

Lesson Ideas:  Students will share their opinions about what factors they feel cause fluctuations in the crime rate? Describe the recent trends in crime statistics. Technology and Resources: http://www.bestplaces.net/crime/default.aspx , http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/ 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills

SM A 11.1

Lesson Ideas:  Using the Opposing Viewpoints resource site, students will research the arguments on various social issues. Technology and Resources: http://find.galegroup.com/ovrc/start.do?prodId=OVRC&userGroupName=chag15532 , http://www.procon.org/ 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Self-motivation/initiative, Academic/learning skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

225

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Critique data and information to determine the adequacy of support for conclusions.

"

INDICATOR

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

45. Critique the conclusions drawn from survey and research data by questioning: a. Sample size; b. Demographics; c. The sponsoring organization; d. Logic of the conclusions reached.

SM B 11.6

46. Research an issue or topic by gathering, recording, evaluating and interpreting relevant data.

SM B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze, evaluate and interpret charts and graphs. Technology and Resources: http://www.prb.org/ , http://www.census.gov/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Academic/learning skills, Flexibility/adaptability

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a research paper using APA documentation style. Technology and Resources: http://www.chagrin-falls.k12.oh.us/cfhs/library/researchdatabases.htm , http://www.turnitin.com/static/index.html, daily news print 21st Century Skills: Information Literacy, Time management skills, Critical thinking

Develop a research project that identifies the various perspectives on an issue and explain a resolution of that issue.

47. Develop a research project and make formal presentations to the class and/or community members using: a. Key terms; b. Support for main ideas; c. Examples; d. Statistics and other evidence; e. Visual aids; f. Formal citation of sources.

SM C 12.4

Lesson Ideas:  Students will work within groups to research the process of modernization around the world. Each member of the group will select one country. Students’ research will determine if the country is a core, peripheral, or semi-peripheral country. Each student will write a short paragraph explaining why it fits in the category. Each group will create a map to show the locations of the countries.  Students will question elderly subject about their life. Students will share their findings and experience with the class. Technology and Resources: http://www.infoplease.com/countries.html , http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/0,,pagePK:180619~theSitePK:136917,00.html 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/collaboration, Academic/ learning skills, Self-motivation initiative

Work in groups to analyze an issue and make decisions.

48. Apply the processes of persuasion, compromise and negotiation to the resolution of conflicts and differences.

SM D 11.8

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a conflict-resolution simulation activity. Technology and Resources: http://www.usip.org/class/simulations/ , http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtS earch_SearchValue_0=EJ415729&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ415729 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills, Creativity

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

226

SOCIAL STUDIES SOCIOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Work in groups to analyze an issue and make decisions. (cont.)

"

INDICATOR 49. Build consensus within a group by: a. Finding points of agreement; b. Identifying points individuals are willing to concede; c. Making sure that all voices are heard; d. Attempting to understand the view of others. 50. Engage in group work on issues-analysis and decisionmaking: a. Identify a problem or dilemma; b. Analyze the interests, values and points of view; c. Identify causes of the problem or dilemma; d. Propose alternative solutions; e. Formulate a position or course of action; f. Evaluate the consequences of the action taken.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. SM D 12.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will complete a conflict-resolution simulation activity. Technology and Resources: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtS earch_SearchValue_0=EJ415729&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ415729 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills, Creativity

SM D 12.7

Lesson Ideas:  Students will brainstorm problems in groups. Students will develop a set of criteria on what is to be achieved. Both researched and non-researched problems will be addressed. Technology and Resources: http://sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-portal-res?id=SOH1360-0-9999, analyzing primary resources handouts 21st Century Skills: Interpersonal skills, Organization skills, Critical thinking, Problem-solving skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

227

PSYCHOLOGY

228

SOCIAL STUDIES PSYCHOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK HISTORY Explain patterns of historical continuity and change by challenging arguments of historical inevitability.

INDICATOR 1. Challenge arguments of historical inevitability by giving examples of how different choices could have led to different consequences (e.g., choices made during the Civil War, choices relating to immigration policy, or choices made during the Cuban Missile Crisis).

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

H A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will explore the historical evolution of the information psychologists have discovered concerning the explanations for human behavior.  Discuss basic human motivation.  Compare “Nature-Nurture” explanations for behavior.  Identify and examine 19th century “pioneers” of behavioral theory.  Students will research and write an essay describing the evolution of the development of psychology.  Essay should reflect how theories of one behavioralist impact on those of subsequent theorists.  Attempt to establish a “chain of influence” throughout your essay. Resources and Technology: http://www.research.org/cogsocial.htm , http://www.apsa.org , http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/, Benjamin, L. (2000), “American Psychologist”, Furumoto (1989) “The New History of Psychology”, “From Seance to Science: A History of the Profession of Psychology” (Wadsworth 2004), http://www.elvers.stjoe.udayton.edu/history/welcome.htm , http://www.ApPsychology.net 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking

Use historical interpretations to explain current issues.

2. Analyze primary source material to see if a historical interpretation is supported.

H B 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will examine the “Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders” (DSM-IV) with relationship to its historical development.  Use the DSM-IV to identify symptoms, sources and suggested treatment of selected disorders.  Using DSM-I, II and/or III (previous editions) explain how diagnosis and treatment have changed over the years.  Analyze the development of the DSM from its inception to the current printing. Resources and Technology: http://www.psych.org/clin res/qa.cfm, http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/itl/,http:///www.mentalhealth.com, http://www.psychologynet.org/dsm.html, http://www.behavenet.com/capsules/disorders/dsm4TRclassification.htm,http://www.psych.org/research/dor/ds m/index.cfM 21st Century Skills: Organizational skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

229

SOCIAL STUDIES PSYCHOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Use historical interpretations to explain current issues.

INDICATOR 3. Analyze cause-andeffect relationships and multiple causation including the influence of ideas, the role of chance and individual and collective action.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. H B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will identify and explain the six varied “schools” of psychology within the historical context of their development and their attempts to answer behavioral questions.  Students will explain the fundamental principles, theorists and methodology of the following approaches to psychology: behavioral, biological, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic and sociocultural.  Students will research and lead a discussion of each “school” describing their influence on psychology today. Resources and Technology “Scientific American” (June 2000), Plotnik (2001), Friman and Allen (1993) “Changes in Modern Psychology”, Gabbard (2000) “American Psychoanalysis in the New Millennium”, http://www.elvers.stjoe.udayton.edu/history/welcome.htm , http://psychoclassics.yorku.ca/, http://www.apa.org/, http://www.psy.pdx.edu/Psicafe/research/ 21st Century Skills: Organization, critical thinking and leadership skills

PEOPLE IN SOCIETIES Analyze how issues 4. Identify the may be viewed perspectives of diverse differently by various cultural groups when cultural groups. analyzing current issues.

PS A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Students will examine the behavioral distinctions that exist within different countries and societies within them.  Compare problem-solving approaches and mnemonic devices of Australian Aborigines and conventional Western methods.  Collect and discuss current articles illustrating non-western problem solving approaches.  Students will discuss the definition of “normal” behavior within a variety of cultures. Resources and Technology: http://www.vanguard.edu/psyc./webculture.html , http://www.feminist.com , Films: “Face Value” and “A World of Gestures”, Begley (Jan. 1998),”Is everybody Crazy?” Newsweek, Betencourt and Lopez, (1993) “American Psychologist”, Bailey, Dunne and Martin (2000) “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology”, Bond and Smith (1996) “Psychological Bulletin “ 119, Fowers and Richardson (1996) “Why is Multiculturalism Good?” (Film) “Joy Luck Club” 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, critical thinking, problem solving

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

230

SOCIAL STUDIES PSYCHOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze how issues may be viewed differently by various cultural groups. (cont.)

INDICATOR 5. Analyze proposed solutions to current issues from the perspectives of diverse cultural groups.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. PS A 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will explore personality disorders that appear more prevalent in one area of the world than other areas.  Using a student generated list of disorders research frequency of occurrence in selected locations in the world.  Attempt to discover causes in terms of socio-cultural explanations.  Student will report on a country and the unique customs/traditions, etc., that allow the citizens of that country to behave differently from those in the United States. Resources and Technology: http://www.socialpsychology.org/, Beck (1976) “Cognitive Therapy and Emotional Disorders”, Briggs (1970), Never in Anger: Portrait of an Eskimo Family” http://www.psychologywadsworth.com , http://www.psych.upenn.edu/seligman/ 21st Century Skills: Multicultural skills, critical thinking, teamwork/collaboration

Explain the role of diverse cultural institutions in shaping American society.

6. Evaluate the role of institutions in guiding, transmitting, preserving and changing culture.

PS C 12.5

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze the role government agencies (FDA etc.) and psychiatric professional organizations (APA, etc.) play in regulating behavior therapies. Resources and Technology: http://www.mentalhealth.com, Corrigan (2000) “Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice”, Cohen (2001) “Ground Zero: Aids Research in Africa”, Goode (2000) “How Culture Molds Habits of Thought” “Ethical Principles of Psychology and Code of Conduct” (2000), “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct” (2002) 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking

ECONOMICS Analyze how scarcity of productive resources affects supply, demand, inflation and economic choices.

7. Compare how values and beliefs influence economic decisions in different communities.

E A 12.1

Lesson Ideas:  Student will recognize the growing relationship between mental health and pharmaceutical industries.  Collect current articles and examine scholarly journals for discussion leads. Resources and Technology: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/anxiety/, Gurgen and Lock (1996) Psychological Science in Cultural Context”, http://www.apa.org/ethics/, http://www.grohol.com/resources 21st Century Skills: Organization skills, leadership skills

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES PSYCHOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK Analyze the role of fiscal and regulatory policies in a mixed economy.

INDICATOR 8. Analyze economic policy decisions made by governments that have resulted in intended and unintended consequences.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF. E D 12.6

Lesson Ideas:  Students will understand cost factors concerning institutionalization by completing the following:.  Research and compute dollar costs from diagnosis through 3 years of institutionalization as relates to a major disorder. (selected disorder)  Discuss the effects of the de-institutionalization movement of the 1960s/1970s on the mental health community. Resources and Technology: http://www.apa.org, Atchison and Kerwin (1997) “Cost Effectiveness of Clozapine”, Antonuccio and Thomas (1997) “Cost-effective Analysis of Cognitive Therapy and Prozac”, http://www.who.int/en/ , http://www.grohol.com/resources , http://www.nimh.nih.gov.nimhhome/index.cfm 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking, academic/learning skills.

CITIZENSHIP, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Evaluate various 9. Practice forms of CRR means for citizens to civic discussion and A take action on a participation consistent 12.1 particular issue. with the ideals of citizens of a democratic republic: a. Persuasive speech; b. Panel discussion; c. Debate. "

10. Evaluate policies that have been proposed as ways of dealing with social changes resulting from new technologies (e.g., censorship of the media, intellectual property rights, or organ donation).

CRR A 12.2

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research, assume a position (role) on a current legal interpretation concerning the relationship of drug and talk therapies to behavior. Resources and Technology: http://www.rebt.org/,http://www.spods.net/personality/theorists.html, http://www.wynja.com/personality/index.php3, Bateman and Fonagy (2001) “Effectiveness of Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Personality Disorder”, Flett (1999) “The Continuity of Depression in Clinical and Non-clinical Samples”, Gould and Pollack (1997) “Cognitive Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment of Anxiety Disorder”, “Chemical Feelings” Gurin (1980) 21st Century Skills: Self-motivation/dependability, critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Students will understand the rights of any individual concerning scientific studies/experiments.  Students will discuss the responsibilities and consequences demanded by law concerning the reporting of abuse to proper authorities.  Students will examine and understand the role government agencies play in establishing acceptable standards of drug and talk therapies.  Students will identify the four criteria that must be adhered to when an individual agrees to become involved with any behavior study/experiment. Resources and Technology: http://beckinstitute.org/, http://www.emdr.com/, (Film) “Gender: Social Influences”, Grunbaum (1993) “Validation in the Clinical Theory of Psychoanalysis”, “ Ethical Principles of Psychology and Code of Conduct” (APA 2002). 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES PSYCHOLOGY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES OHIO BENCHMARK

INDICATOR

SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS AND METHODS Obtain and evaluate 11. Obtain and evaluate information from information from public public records and records and other other resources related resources related to a to a public policy public policy issue. issue. Critique data and information to determine the adequacy of support for conclusions.

12. Research an issue or topic by gathering, recording, evaluating and interpreting relevant data.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

REF.

SM A 12.1

SM B 12.3

Lesson Ideas:  Students will gather information (articles) from the news media as well as scholarly journals concerning discoveries, perspectives, and studies to understand behavioral science.  Lead discussion regarding scientific approach presented in the articles and/or policy implications for court system and mental health agencies. 21st Century Skills: Leadership skills, interpersonal skills, self-motivation/initiative Lesson Ideas:  Students will utilize appropriate APA guidelines and methodology to complete two formal research papers (one each 9 weeks). Topic #1 will focus on neurobiological/genetic causes of behavior and Topic #2 will focus on environmental influences on behavior.  Apply American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.  Use the most current and scholarly data available and organize according to APA format. Resources and Technology: EBSCOHost - Academic Search Premier, Health Source, Medline, Psychology and Behavioral Science Collection

Develop a research project that identifies the various perspectives on an issue and explain a resolution of that issue.

13. Develop a research project and make formal presentations to the class and/or community members using: a. Key terms; b. Support for main ideas; c. Examples; d. Statistics and other evidence; e. Visual aids; f. Formal citation of sources.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

SM C 12.4

21st Century Skills: Work ethic/dependability, organization, academic/learning skills Lesson Ideas:  Students will present an evaluation of a selected film using the criteria listed below. Does the film provide:  An accurate depiction of a mental disorder?  An accurate portrayal of a person suffering from a mental disease?  An accurate depiction of structure, process and function of mental health treatment including psychotherapy and medication?  An effective use of psychological principles and knowledge?  Insight into the subjective experience of a person suffering from a mental disorder? Resources and Technology: “A Beautiful Mind”, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”, “A Clockwork Orange”, “ 12 Monkeys”, “Ordinary People”, “Primal Fear”, “What About Bob”, “Girl Interrupted”, “Silence of the Lambs”, “Sybil”, “Psycho”, “The Three Faces of Eve” 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/collaboration, critical thinking, organization skills

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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PHILOSOPHY

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SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES BENCHMARK INDICATOR Recognize and use philosophy as a systematic “tool” for critical and disciplined thinking. (Western)

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1. Learn and apply rules of inference using various premise and conclusion relationships.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Ideas:  Post-Malnerny readings: student will identify weakness and strengths of selected logical formats.  Student will examine and identify argument formats using Frost readings – “Nature of God” and excerpts from Plato, Aristotle, Anselm. Hobbes and Descartes. Technology and Resources: Being Logical by D. Q. McInerny, Teachings of Philosophers by S. E. Frost

2. Identify and analyze selected inductive and deductive arguments.

21st Century Skills: academic/learning, critical thinking Lesson Ideas:  Student will use above selections to critique effectiveness of stated arguments. Criteria of “premise-conclusion relationship” should be applied. This process will be subject to peer evaluation. Technology and Resources: Being Logical by D. Q. McInerny

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3. Construct a sound argument using established logical guidelines.

21st Century Skills: critical thinking, problem solving Lesson Ideas:  Student will select a “Truth” issue and create a simple argument effectively applying premise-conclusion relationships. Student products will be subject to peer evaluation. Technology and Resources: Being Logical by D. Q. McInerny 21st Century Skills: organizational, self-motivation/initiative

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4. Recognize sources of illogical thinking through examination of selected arguments.

Lesson Ideas:  Student will examine a variety of poorly constructed arguments containing logical fallacies and illogical “premiseconclusion relationships”. Student will identify these weaknesses. Technology and Resources: Being Logical by D. Q. McInerny 21st Century Skills: critical thinking, problem solving

Understand that strands of philosophic thought and concepts are often built on sequential arguments and reflect cumulative historical development. (Western)

5. Explain relationships between various schools of thought and how earlier schools and/or individuals influence later schools.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  On-going process through coursework - student will record and discuss strand connections.  Student will create an “Idealine” (timeline) about “Man’s place in the universe.” The timeline will connect preSocratic Greeks-Plato-Aristotle-and any Scholastics-Bacon-Hobbes-Decartes. Technology and Resources: Story of Philosophy by Will Durant 21st Century Skills: academic/learning, organization, critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES BENCHMARK

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

INDICATOR

Understand that strands of philosophic thought and concepts are often built on sequential arguments and reflect cumulative historical development. (Western) (cont.) Recognize that significant philosophic questions are universal in nature and are subject to comparative analysis. (Examine philosophy systems and cultural perspectives) (Non-Western)

6. Explain the influence of (to include but not limited to) Socrates on Plato’s philosophic concepts; Plato on Aristotle; Aristotle on medieval religion and philosophy. 7. Understand that concepts of “Truth, Beauty, and Justice” will vary in Western philosophic traditions as much as the Eastern traditions and that deeper examination sheds greater light on the “universal questions.”

Lesson Ideas:  Student will create an “Idealine” (timeline) about “The Nature of God”. The timeline will connect pre-Socratic Greeks-Plato-Aristotle-and any Scholastics-Bacon-Hobbes-Decartes.  Student will read selected essay materials from Aquinas, Augustine, Anselm and identify Platonic/Aristotelian links.

"

8. Compare the concepts of “Social Justice” through Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic and Western secular perspectives.

Lesson Ideas:  Using charts/diagrams above: student will compose essays reflecting perspectives of each identified system.  Responds to: a. What should the relationship be between man and state? b. What should the relationship be between man and man? c. What should the relationship be between nation and nation?

Technology and Resources: Story of Philosophy by Will Durant 21st Century Skills: self-motivation/initiative, creativity, problem-solving Lesson Ideas:  Post Maumia, Blofeld, Durant and Smart readings dealing with Hindu, Buddhist and Islamic tenets and certain Western views. Student will create a visual (chart/diagram), reflecting respective positions on selected “Universal Questions,” i.e. “Do we have free will?” “What is the highest excellence or virtue of mankind?” etc. Technology and Resources: Philosophy by James Maumia, Tantric Buddhism by John Blofeld, The Long Search by Ninian Smart 21st Century Skills: critical thinking, academic/learning

Technology and Resources: Philosophy by James Maumia 21st Century Skills: multicultural, critical thinking "

9. Examine the concept of “Truth/Reality” through Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic and Western perspectives.

Lesson Ideas:  Using charts/diagrams above, student will prepare discussion notes addressing: a. Is there a difference between the way things appear to us and the way they really are? b. Does mental or spiritual reality ultimately depend on the physical world? c. Is everything that happens pre-determined? Technology and Resources: Philosophy by James Maumia 21st Century Skills: multicultural, academic/learning

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES BENCHMARK Understand that “Universal Questions” are also addressed through religion and mythology. (Non-Western and Western)

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

INDICATOR 10. Examine archetypes of various cultures’ myth and religion and compare their attempts to address the “universals.”

Lesson Ideas:  Post Campell and Bulfinch readings - student will define “archetype” and its role as a significant cultural dynamic.  Student will use selected examples of mythology (Western and non-Western) and religious metaphors to find archetypal examples and provide explanations regarding such questions as “What is the nature of the universe?”, “What is man’s place in the universe?” “What is good and evil?” Technology and Resources: The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell, Bulfinch’s Mythology by Thomas Bulfinch, The Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell 21st Century Skills: multicultural, critical thinking

"

11. Recognize how archetypal metaphor in selected Native American, Greek and Hindu mythology addresses universal “Truths”.

Lesson Ideas:  Utilizing previous information, students will create a list of archetypes from myth/metaphor that reflects specific Western philosophic terms and/or concepts. Technology and Resources: The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell, Bulfinch’s Mythology by Thomas Bulfinch, The Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell 21st Century Skills: multicultural, academic/learning

"

12. Examine image process of Hinduism and Buddhism (Viveka) and compare to Platonic archetypes.

Lesson Ideas:  Student will research and in writing compare and contrast Plato’s Form Theory and the Hindu/Buddhist “image process.” Can the argument be made (or can it not) that Eastern and Western thought systems converge? Explain. Technology and Resources: The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell. Bullfinch’s Mythology by Thomas Bulfinch, The Hero with a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell 21st Century Skills: multicultural, critical thinking, creativity

Acquire an historical perspective relating to the emergence of ideas and their impact on society and significant political, religious, scientific and economic movements (past and present). (Western)

13. Analyze selected philosophic systems of thought on developments in science, government and religion.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  Using post Frost readings (Ideas and Science) student will “Idealine” connecting Plato-Aristotle-Galileo-BaconDesmarte-Spinoza. Technology and Resources: Lessons of History by Will Durant, The Life of Greece by Will Durant, The Age of Faith by Will Durant, A Passion for Wisdom by Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen M. Higgens, Teachings of Philosophers by E. S. Frost 21st Century Skills: critical thinking, self-motivation, academic/learning

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES BENCHMARK Acquire an historical perspective relating to the emergence of ideas and their impact on society and significant political, religious, scientific and economic movements (past and present). (Western) (cont.)

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

INDICATOR 14. Recognize influence/connections of thought, theory and/or practice, to include but not limited to: a. Aristotle on Western science, b. Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau on postenlightenment government, c. German idealism, Kant on Christianity.

Lesson Ideas:  Using post-Frost reading “Man and the State”, student will “Idealine” Plato-Aristotle-Ambrose-DuscotusMachiavelli-Hobbes-Locke-Rousseau-Nietzche.  Student will research and prepare discussion notes addressing Kant (German idealist) and his views on God, immortality and morality. How did these views impact Christianity?

Learn to use and apply the language of philosophy, i.e. terms and definitions pertinent to critical examination and expression. (Western)

15. Apply terms and definitions through vocabulary study and the construction of written positions on selected issues or arguments.

Lesson Ideas:  Students will receive vocabulary list prior to readings. Term references are reinforced consistently through coursework.

"

16. Present persuasive arguments both orally and written, applying appropriate terminology in a logical format.

Lesson Ideas:  Student will appropriately and effectively use and apply terms and concepts in all essay arguments, discussions and research production.

Technology and Resources: Lessons of History by Will Durant, The Life of Greece by Will Durant, The Age of Faith by Will Durant, A Passion for Wisdom by Robert C. Solomon and Kathleen M. Higgins, Teachings of Philosophers by S. E. Frost 21st Century Skills: academic/learning, critical thinking

Technology and Resources: Dictionary of Philosophy by Simon Blackburn, Being Logical by D. Q. McInerny 21st Century Skills: work ethic/dependability, self-motivation/initiative, time management

Technology and Resources: Dictionary of Philosophy by Simon Blackburn, Being Logical by D. Q. McInerny 21st Century Skills: critical thinking, creativity, time management, organization

Read, examine, discuss and analyze selected essays to include (but are not limited to) works by Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Decartes, Locke and Kant. (Western)

17. Examine and discuss selected works in small group seminars. Reaction papers may represent collective or individual efforts.

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

Lesson Ideas:  Students will prepare position paper(s) on post essay readings. Topics to include: “In the age of science, is it irrational to be religious?”, “What makes something the same at two different times?”, “Can specific moral rules be rationally justified?”, “Does God exist and what is his nature?” Technology and Resources: Enduring Issues in Philosophy by Gerald W. Eichhoefer, Thinking Through Philosophy by Chris Horner and Emrys Westacott, Introduction of Greek Philosophy by J. V. Luce 21st Century Skills: interpersonal, teamwork/collaboration, organization, critical thinking

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES BENCHMARK Read, examine, discuss and analyze selected essays to include (but are not limited to) works by Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Decartes, Locke and Kant. (Western) (cont.) Analyze and critique arguments orally and written in a manner reflecting skillful use of language, logic and subtleties of reasoning. (Non-Western and Western) "

Examine systems of thought associated with branches of philosophy, which include but are not limited to aesthetics, ethics, metaphysics, ontology, epistemology and logic. (Non-Western and Western)

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

INDICATOR 18. Debate content and merit of argument upon completion and analysis of selected philosopher’s works.

Lesson Ideas:  Student will express positions in debate format. Sound logic, effective use of terms, concepts and integrity of philosopher’s intent should be applied. Technology and Resources: Enduring Issues in Philosophy by Gerald W. Eichhoefer, Thinking Through Philosophy by Chris Horner and Emrys Westacott, Introduction of Greek Philosophy by J. V. Luce 21st Century Skills: leadership, flexibility/adaptability, critical thinking, organization

19. Create in writing and prepare to defend orally an “original argument” addressing at least one “universal question.”

Lesson Ideas:  Students receive a list of “Universal Questions” in syllabus. Student will select one (or may re-construct or pose their own, with approval) and prepare an original argument. Argument will be articulated in writing. Technology and Resources: Independent reading 21st Century Skills: self-motivation, creativity, problem-solving

20. Defend or attack (written and/or orally) a selected philosopher’s position on a specific argument. 21. Research and prepare to lead a group discussion on a selected field of philosophy. Provide a properly formatted bibliography.

Lesson Ideas:  Student will examine philosophic position/arguments from contemporary publications (Parabola and Philosophy Now) and critique (defend and/or attack) the quality of arguments. Technology and Resources: Independent reading 21st Century Skills: critical thinking, self-motivation, academic/learning Lesson Ideas:  Students receive a list of branches of philosophy in syllabus. Student will select a field of study, research and organize a 40-minute teaching unit, which should include: a. Explanation of the branch. b. Recognition of significant contributors. (Who? How? Why important?) c. Exploration of objectives and problems typical of the field. d. Discussion questions designed to stimulate student audience, thought and participation. Technology and Resources: Independent research 21st Century Skills: leadership, organization, time management, self-motivation

Key to Reference Column: Line 1: (Standard) H = History GVT = Government Line 2: Ohio Benchmark Within Standard Line 3: Grade Level . Indicator Number

PS = People in Societies CRR = Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

GEO = Geography SM = Social Studies Skills and Methods

E = Economics

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CollegeBoard AP

Advanced Placement Psychology Course Description EFFECTIVE FALL 2010 AP Course Descriptions are updated regularly. Please visit AP Central® (apcentral.collegeboard.com) to determine whether a more recent Course Description PDF is available.

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOOGY AP Psychology The Advanced Placement Program offers a course and exam in psychology to qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology. The exam presumes at least one semester of college-level preparation, as is described in this book. The inclusion of material in the Course Description and in the exam is not intended as an endorsement by the College Board or ETS of the content, ideas, or values expressed in the material. The material has been selected by experienced high school and college and university instructors of psychology who serve as members of the AP Psychology Development Committee. In their judgment, the material printed here reflects the content of a typical introductory college course in psychology.

THE COURSE Purpose The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Prerequisites For Students All students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum should be considered for admission to AP courses. The College Board encourages the elimination of barriers that restrict access to AP courses for students from ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the AP Program. Schools should make every effort to ensure that their AP classes reflect the diversity of their student population. For Teachers and Schools AP classes require extra time on the part of the teacher for preparation, individual consultation with students, and the reading of a much larger number of assignments than would normally be given to students in regular classes. The AP Psychology Development Committee strongly urges that any teacher offering such a class be assigned a reduced number of teaching preparations. To facilitate the teaching and learning of psychology, the committee also suggests that schools enrich the resource materials available to teachers and students in classrooms and libraries. Because the AP Psychology course is designed to mirror an entry-level college course, and most college faculty use the most up-to-date textbooks and supplemental materials in their classes, the AP Psychology Exam is developed using current materials. It is highly recommended that AP Psychology teachers and students use current textbooks or supplement older texts with more recent material. Although many schools are able to establish AP courses, some schools with fewer students offer tutorial work associated with a regular course or a program of independent study. Examples of the content and organization of AP Psychology courses and equivalent college courses, as well as suggestions for appropriate resource materials, can be found in the AP Psychology Teacher’s Guide. Go to AP Central (apcentral.collegeboard.com) or see page 23 for ordering information.

Goals An introductory college course in psychology is generally one semester, with some variation among colleges. An AP Psychology course need not follow any specific college curriculum. Rather, the aim of the course is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses.

© 2010 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com.

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOOGY Topics and Learning Objectives The following is a description of learning objectives for the major content areas covered in the AP Psychology Exam, as well as the approximate percentages of the multiple-choice section devoted to each area. This listing is not intended to be an exhaustive list of topics. I. History and Approaches (2–4%) Psychology has evolved markedly since its inception as a discipline in 1879. There have been significant changes in the theories that psychologists use to explain behavior and mental processes. In addition, the methodology of psychological research has expanded to include a diversity of approaches to data gathering. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Recognize how philosophical perspectives shaped the development of psychological thought. • Describe and compare different theoretical approaches in explaining behavior: — structuralism, functionalism, and behaviorism in the early years; — Gestalt, psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, and humanism emerging later; — evolutionary, biological, and cognitive as more contemporary approaches. • Recognize the strengths and limitations of applying theories to explain behavior. • Distinguish the different domains of psychology: — biological, clinical, cognitive, counseling, developmental, educational, experimental, human factors, industrial–organizational, personality, psychometric, and social. • Identify the major historical figures in psychology (e.g., Mary Whiton Calkins, Charles Darwin, Dorothea Dix, Sigmund Freud, G. Stanley Hall, William James, Ivan Pavlov, Jean Piaget, Carl Rogers, B. F. Skinner, Margaret Floy Washburn, John B. Watson, Wilhelm Wundt). II. Research Methods (8–10%) Psychology is an empirical discipline. Psychologists develop knowledge by doing research. Research provides guidance for psychologists who develop theories to explain behavior and who apply theories to solve problems in behavior. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Differentiate types of research (e.g., experiments, correlational studies, survey research, naturalistic observations, and case studies) with regard to purpose, strengths, and weaknesses. • Describe how research design drives the reasonable conclusions that can be drawn (e.g., experiments are useful for determining cause and effect; the use of experimental controls reduces alternative explanations). • Identify independent, dependent, confounding, and control variables in experimental designs. • Distinguish between random assignment of participants to conditions in experiments and random selection of participants, primarily in correlational studies and surveys. • Predict the validity of behavioral explanations based on the quality of research design (e.g., confounding variables limit confidence in research conclusions). • Distinguish the purposes of descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. • Apply basic descriptive statistical concepts, including interpreting and constructing graphs and calculating simple descriptive statistics (e.g., measures of central tendency, standard deviation). • Discuss the value of reliance on operational definitions and measurement in behavioral research. • Identify how ethical issues inform and constrain research practices. • Describe how ethical and legal guidelines (e.g., those provided by the American Psychological Association, federal regulations, local institutional review boards) protect research participants and promote sound ethical practice.

© 2010 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com.

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOOGY III. Biological Bases of Behavior (8–10%) An effective introduction to the relationship between physiological processes and behavior—including the influence of neural function, the nervous system and the brain, and genetic contributions to behavior—is an important element in the AP course. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Identify basic processes and systems in the biological bases of behavior, including parts of the neuron and the process of transmission of a signal between neurons. • Discuss the influence of drugs on neurotransmitters (e.g., reuptake mechanisms). • Discuss the effect of the endocrine system on behavior. • Describe the nervous system and its subdivisions and functions: — central and peripheral nervous systems; — major brain regions, lobes, and cortical areas; — brain lateralization and hemispheric specialization. • Recount historic and contemporary research strategies and technologies that support research (e.g., case studies, split-brain research, imaging techniques). • Discuss psychology’s abiding interest in how heredity, environment, and evolution work together to shape behavior. • Predict how traits and behavior can be selected for their adaptive value. • Identify key contributors (e.g., Paul Broca, Charles Darwin, Michael Gazzaniga, Roger Sperry, Carl Wernicke). IV. Sensation and Perception (6–8%) Everything that organisms know about the world is first encountered when stimuli in the environment activate sensory organs, initiating awareness of the external world. Perception involves the interpretation of the sensory inputs as a cognitive process. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Discuss basic principles of sensory transduction, including absolute threshold, difference threshold, signal detection, and sensory adaptation. • Describe sensory processes (e.g., hearing, vision, touch, taste, smell, vestibular, kinesthesis, pain), including the specific nature of energy transduction, relevant anatomical structures, and specialized pathways in the brain for each of the senses. • Explain common sensory disorders (e.g., visual and hearing impairments). • Describe general principles of organizing and integrating sensation to promote stable awareness of the external world (e.g., Gestalt principles, depth perception). • Discuss how experience and culture can influence perceptual processes (e.g., perceptual set, context effects). • Explain the role of top-down processing in producing vulnerability to illusion. • Discuss the role of attention in behavior. • Challenge common beliefs in parapsychological phenomena. • Identify the major historical figures in sensation and perception (e.g., Gustav Fechner, David Hubel, Ernst Weber, Torsten Wiesel). V. States of Consciousness (2–4%) Understanding consciousness and what it encompasses is critical to an appreciation of what is meant by a given state of consciousness. The study of variations in consciousness includes an examination of the sleep cycle, dreams, hypnosis, and the effects of psychoactive drugs. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Describe various states of consciousness and their impact on behavior. • Discuss aspects of sleep and dreaming:

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOOGY — stages and characteristics of the sleep cycle; — theories of sleep and dreaming; — symptoms and treatments of sleep disorders. • Describe historic and contemporary uses of hypnosis (e.g., pain control, psychotherapy). • Explain hypnotic phenomena (e.g., suggestibility, dissociation). • Identify the major psychoactive drug categories (e.g., depressants, stimulants) and classify specific drugs, including their psychological and physiological effects. • Discuss drug dependence, addiction, tolerance, and withdrawal. • Identify the major figures in consciousness research (e.g., William James, Sigmund Freud, Ernest Hilgard). VI. Learning (7–9%) This section of the course introduces students to differences between learned and unlearned behavior. The primary focus is exploration of different kinds of learning, including classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning. The biological bases of behavior illustrate predispositions for learning. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Distinguish general differences between principles of classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning (e.g., contingencies). • Describe basic classical conditioning phenomena, such as acquisition, extinction, spontaneous recovery, generalization, discrimination, and higher-order learning. • Predict the effects of operant conditioning (e.g., positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, punishment, schedules of reinforcement). • Predict how practice, schedules of reinforcement, and motivation will influence quality of learning. • Interpret graphs that exhibit the results of learning experiments. • Provide examples of how biological constraints create learning predispositions. • Describe the essential characteristics of insight learning, latent learning, and social learning. • Apply learning principles to explain emotional learning, taste aversion, superstitious behavior, and learned helplessness. • Suggest how behavior modification, biofeedback, coping strategies, and self-control can be used to address behavioral problems. • Identify key contributors in the psychology of learning (e.g., Albert Bandura, John Garcia, Ivan Pavlov, Robert Rescorla, B. F. Skinner, Edward Thorndike, Edward Tolman, John B. Watson). VII. Cognition (8–10%) In this unit students learn how humans convert sensory input into kinds of information. They examine how humans learn, remember, and retrieve information. This part of the course also addresses problem solving, language, and creativity. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Compare and contrast various cognitive processes: — effortful versus automatic processing; — deep versus shallow processing; — focused versus divided attention. • Describe and differentiate psychological and physiological systems of memory (e.g., short-term memory, procedural memory). • Outline the principles that underlie effective encoding, storage, and construction of memories. • Describe strategies for memory improvement. • Synthesize how biological, cognitive, and cultural factors converge to facilitate acquisition, development, and use of language. • Identify problem-solving strategies as well as factors that influence their effectiveness.

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOOGY • List the characteristics of creative thought and creative thinkers. • Identify key contributors in cognitive psychology (e.g., Noam Chomsky, Hermann Ebbinghaus, Wolfgang Köhler, Elizabeth Loftus, George A. Miller). VIII. Motivation and Emotion (6–8%) In this part of the course, students explore biological and social factors that motivate behavior and biological and cultural factors that influence emotion. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Identify and apply basic motivational concepts to understand the behavior of humans and other animals (e.g., instincts, incentives, intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation). • Discuss the biological underpinnings of motivation, including needs, drives, and homeostasis. • Compare and contrast motivational theories (e.g., drive reduction theory, arousal theory, general adaptation theory), including the strengths and weaknesses of each. • Describe classic research findings in specific motivation systems (e.g., eating, sex, social) • Discuss theories of stress and the effects of stress on psychological and physical well-being. • Compare and contrast major theories of emotion (e.g., James–Lange, Cannon– Bard, Schachter two-factor theory). • Describe how cultural influences shape emotional expression, including variations in body language. • Identify key contributors in the psychology of motivation and emotion (e.g., William James, Alfred Kinsey, Abraham Maslow, Stanley Schachter, Hans Selye). IX. Developmental Psychology (7–9%) Developmental psychology deals with the behavior of organisms from conception to death and examines the processes that contribute to behavioral change throughout the life span. The major areas of emphasis in the course are prenatal development, motor development, socialization, cognitive development, adolescence, and adulthood. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Discuss the interaction of nature and nurture (including cultural variations) in the determination of behavior. • Explain the process of conception and gestation, including factors that influence successful fetal development (e.g., nutrition, illness, substance abuse). • Discuss maturation of motor skills. • Describe the influence of temperament and other social factors on attachment and appropriate socialization. • Explain the maturation of cognitive abilities (e.g., Piaget’s stages, information processing). • Compare and contrast models of moral development (e.g., Kohlberg, Gilligan). • Discuss maturational challenges in adolescence, including related family conflicts. • Characterize the development of decisions related to intimacy as people mature. • Predict the physical and cognitive changes that emerge as people age, including steps that can be taken to maximize function. • Describe how sex and gender influence socialization and other aspects of development. • Identify key contributors in developmental psychology (e.g., Mary Ainsworth, Albert Bandura, Diana Baumrind, Erik Erikson, Sigmund Freud, Carol Gilligan, Harry Harlow, Lawrence Kohlberg, Konrad Lorenz, Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky). X. Personality (5–7%) In this section of the course, students explore major theories of how humans develop enduring patterns of behavior and personal characteristics that influence how others relate to them. The unit also addresses research methods used to assess personality. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Compare and contrast the major theories and approaches to explaining personality: psychoanalytic, humanist, cognitive, trait, social learning, and behavioral.

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOOGY • Describe and compare research methods (e.g., case studies and surveys) that psychologists use to investigate personality. • Identify frequently used assessment strategies (e.g., the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory [MMPI], the Thematic Apperception Test [TAT]), and evaluate relative test quality based on reliability and validity of the instruments. • Speculate how cultural context can facilitate or constrain personality development, especially as it relates to self-concept (e.g., collectivistic versus individualistic cultures). • Identify key contributors to personality theory (e.g., Alfred Adler, Albert Bandura, Paul Costa and Robert McCrae, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers). XI. Testing and Individual Differences (5–7%) An understanding of intelligence and assessment of individual differences is highlighted in this portion of the course. Students must understand issues related to test construction and fair use. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Define intelligence and list characteristics of how psychologists measure intelligence: — abstract versus verbal measures; — speed of processing. • Discuss how culture influences the definition of intelligence. • Compare and contrast historic and contemporary theories of intelligence (e.g., Charles Spearman, Howard Gardner, Robert Sternberg). • Explain how psychologists design tests, including standardization strategies and other techniques to establish reliability and validity. • Interpret the meaning of scores in terms of the normal curve. • Describe relevant labels related to intelligence testing (e.g., gifted, cognitively disabled). • Debate the appropriate testing practices, particularly in relation to culture-fair test uses. • Identify key contributors in intelligence research and testing (e.g., Alfred Binet, Francis Galton, Howard Gardner, Charles Spearman, Robert Sternberg, Louis Terman, David Wechsler). XII. Abnormal Behavior (7–9%) In this portion of the course, students examine the nature of common challenges to adaptive functioning. This section emphasizes formal conventions that guide psychologists’ judgments about diagnosis and problem severity. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Describe contemporary and historical conceptions of what constitutes psychological disorders. • Recognize the use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) published by the American Psychiatric Association as the primary reference for making diagnostic judgments. • Discuss the major diagnostic categories, including anxiety and somatoform disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, organic disturbance, personality disorders, and dissociative disorders, and their corresponding symptoms. • Evaluate the strengths and limitations of various approaches to explaining psychological disorders: medical model, psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, biological, and sociocultural. • Identify the positive and negative consequences of diagnostic labels (e.g., the Rosenhan study). • Discuss the intersection between psychology and the legal system (e.g., confidentiality, insanity defense).

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOOGY XIII. Treatment of Abnormal Behavior (5–7%) This section of the course provides students with an understanding of empirically based treatments of psychological disorders. The topic emphasizes descriptions of treatment modalities based on various orientations in psychology. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Describe the central characteristics of psychotherapeutic intervention. • Describe major treatment orientations used in therapy (e.g., behavioral, cognitive, humanistic) and how those orientations influence therapeutic planning. • Compare and contrast different treatment formats (e.g., individual, group). • Summarize effectiveness of specific treatments used to address specific problems. • Discuss how cultural and ethnic context influence choice and success of treatment (e.g., factors that lead to premature termination of treatment). • Describe prevention strategies that build resilience and promote competence. • Identify major figures in psychological treatment (e.g., Aaron Beck, Albert Ellis, Sigmund Freud, Mary Cover Jones, Carl Rogers, B. F. Skinner, Joseph Wolpe). XIV. Social Psychology (8–10%) This part of the course focuses on how individuals relate to one another in social situations. Social psychologists study social attitudes, social influence, and other social phenomena. AP students in psychology should be able to do the following: • Apply attribution theory to explain motives (e.g., fundamental attribution error, self-serving bias). • Describe the structure and function of different kinds of group behavior (e.g., deindividuation, group polarization). • Explain how individuals respond to expectations of others, including groupthink, conformity, and obedience to authority. • Discuss attitudes and how they change (e.g., central route to persuasion). • Predict the impact of the presence of others on individual behavior (e.g., bystander effect, social facilitation). • Describe processes that contribute to differential treatment of group members (e.g., in-group/out-group dynamics, ethnocentrism, prejudice). • Articulate the impact of social and cultural categories (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity) on self-concept and relations with others. • Anticipate the impact of behavior on a self-fulfilling prophecy. • Describe the variables that contribute to altruism, aggression, and attraction. • Discuss attitude formation and change, including persuasion strategies and cognitive dissonance. • Identify important figures in social psychology (e.g., Solomon Asch, Leon Festinger, Stanley Milgram, Philip Zimbardo).

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY (SEMESTER I) INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY INDICATORS SEMESTER I 1.Colonial history to 1763 Identify and assess the emergence of American cultural traits and emerging regional patterns.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:  Explain the reasons for the growth and social stability of the New England colonies.  Explain how conditions in the northern colonies eroded European concepts of social rank and fostered social mobility.  Account for the similarities and differences in development between the New England and Chesapeake colonies.  Discuss the reasons for the growth of slavery and the slave trade in the English colonies of North America.  Explain the historical significance of colonial uprisings in the seventeenth century.  Determine the nature of and problems relating to the Spanish North American Empire.  Describe the influence of the Great Awakening on American religion, common interest, and “nationality.”  Explain the rise of the colonial assemblies and the governing problems they faced.  Discuss the different advantages and disadvantages of the British American colonists and the French in the wars for mastery of the North American continent.  Ascertain the reasons behind the evolving American identity of the colonists even while they became more closely connected to England during the eighteenth century. Technology-Based Resources: Bacon’s Rebellion: The Declaration (1676) Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking Activities: Document-Based Questions Democracy in Colonial Wethersfield, Connecticut New England and the Chesapeake

2. The American Revolution (1763-1783) Identify the origins of colonial resistance and the British response. Analyze the decision for American independence. Examine the military course of the war and peace negotiations.

Lesson Objectives:  Describe each of the fundamental principles and the “politics of virtue” of the American perspective on imperial politics.  Analyze both the motivation for Grenville’s regulations and the popular mass movement that formed in resistance to them.  Analyze the American decision to declare independence from the convening of the Second Continental Congress to the Declaration of Independence.  Compare and contrast the military assets and liabilities of both the British and American forces in the Revolutionary War.  Describe the role of African Americans in the fighting of the American Revolution.  Analyze the role of diplomacy in the success of the American Revolution.

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3. The Republican experiment (1783-1789) Describe the structure of government under the Articles of Confederation and identify the weaknesses and accomplishments of the Article’s government. Examine foreign affairs in the Confederation period. Assess the accomplishments of the Constitutional Convention and the debates over ratification.

4. The Federalist Era (1788-1800) Provide an overview of the Constitution of 1787. Examine the rise of political parties. Identify the nature of foreign affairs with Great Britain, France and Spain during the era. Assess the “Revolution” of 1800.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Technology-Based Resources Boston Massacre Oration Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death Rights of Women in an Independent Republic Petition of “A Grate Number of Blackes of the Province” to Governor Thomas Gage and the Members of the Massachusetts General Court (1774) Lesson Objectives:  Delineate the types and extent of the social and political changes brought by the American Revolution.  Describe the post-revolutionary positions on slavery in both the North and the South.  Specify the post-revolutionary changes in the expectations, rights, and roles of American women.  Describe the major sources and principles of the earliest American constitutions.  Identify the major problems of western settlement and evaluate the Confederation Congress's responses to those problems.  Identify the major domestic and foreign-policy problems of the Confederation Congress and the nationalists' critique of the congressional responses.  Describe the conflict over slavery and its resolution by the delegates to the Philadelphia convention.  Identify the major issues separating the Federalists and Antifederalists. Describe and evaluate the positions taken by each.  Trace the ratification process from the organization of the opposing sides to June 1788.  Describe and explain the major contribution of the Antifederalists to the Constitution. Technology-Based Resources: Marquis de Chastellux, Travels in North America (1786) st 21 Century Skills: Critical Thinking: Document-Based Question The 1780’s: A Critical period? Lesson Objectives:  Compare and contrast the political and economic philosophies advocated by Alexander Hamilton with those of Thomas Jefferson.  Explain how foreign affairs acted as a catalyst in the development of American political parties.  Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of John Adams as president.  Describe the XYZ Affair and its impact on domestic politics, specifically explaining the intent and results of the Alien and Sedition Acts, as well as the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions.  Summarize the accomplishments of the Federalists while they were in power.  Explain the factors that contributed to the downfall and demise of the Federalist Party.

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5. Republicans in power (1801-1823) Analyze the Jeffersonian imprint on American politics and government. Identify causes and results of the “strange” War of 1812. Identify the origins of both nationalism and sectionalism. Analyze the demise of the Federalists and the rise of the two-party system. Identify the characteristics of the early Industrial Revolution.

6. The Jacksonian Era (1828-1840) Identify the origins and characteristics of “mass” democracy. Characterize the Whig alternative to Jacksonian democracy. Assess the origins and success of the reformist “benevolent empire”.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Technology-Based Resources Bill of Rights Sedition Act Farewell Address Thomas Jefferson, Letter to James Madison (1794) Lesson Objectives:  List the goals of Jefferson as president and evaluate his success in accomplishing them.  Explain the circumstances and consequences of the Louisiana Purchase.  Describe the background, results, and significance of the Marbury v. Madison decision (1803).  List and explain the sources of political dissension with which Jefferson had to contend.  Analyze the causes, conduct, and outcome of the War of 1812.  Account for James Madison's ineffectiveness as president.  Discuss the reasons for the ultimate demise of the Federalist Party during this era.  Analyze the factors that contributed to the rise of nationalism after the War of 1812.  Describe the process by which western lands were organized and sold.  Analyze the role played in economic and political matters by the Supreme Court under Chief Justice Marshall.  Explain the perceived international conditions that led to the Monroe Doctrine as well as the specific intent of this statement. Technology-Based Resources The Harbinger, Female Workers of Lowell (1836) James F. Cooper, Notions of the Americans (1840) 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking: Document-Based Question Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian Politics Lesson Objectives:  Explain factors that contributed to the rise of democracy in the 1820s and 1830s.  Describe how the diffusion of political power among the masses encouraged reform initiative and inspired new literary, artistic, and professional trends.  Evaluate the main political and economic issues brought forth in the 1824 and 1828 elections and explain the outcomes of those presidential elections.  Determine the political characteristics and personality traits that contributed to Jackson's image as a "man of the people."  Summarize the problems encountered under Jackson's Indian removal policy.  Contrast the arguments put forth by the states' rightists and the unionists regarding the nullification crisis.

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY INDICATORS SEMESTER I      

Explain why South Carolina seized the tariff issue to mount its support for states' rights. Summarize Jacksonian arguments in their attack against the Bank of the United States. List the factors that caused the Second Great Awakening and discuss the differences between the revivalism that swept the South and the North. Show how the religious revivals became reform movements and why. Describe the "Cult of True Womanhood" and the doctrine of separate spheres. Describe the factors and events that led to the rise of the women's rights movement.

Technology-Based Resources The Sovereignty of the People The Liberator #1 Slavery a Positive Good Walt Whitman, Preface to Leaves of Grass (1855) Michel Chevalier, Society, Manners and Politics in the United States (1834) Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Self-Reliance” (1841) Bank Veto Message 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking: Document-Based Question Jacksonian Democracy 7. Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War Identify the causes behind the lure of the west (1820-1840). Define the arguments for and against the annexation Texas, New Mexico, California, and Oregon. Analyze the causes of the Mexican War. Assess Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

Lesson Objectives:  Explain the causes, events, and results of the Texas revolution.  Discuss the importance of the Santa Fe and Oregon Trails in expanding American trade and settlement.  Trace the development of the Mormon Church and the westward trek of its members.  Identify the candidates and issues and explain the outcome and consequences of the election of 1844.  Evaluate the successes and failures of James K. Polk's administration.  Discuss the rationale for expansion as expressed in the doctrine of manifest destiny.  Summarize the causes, events, and outcomes of the Mexican War, including the experiences of "Hispanic America." Technology-Based Resources War Message John L. O’Sullivan, "The Great Nation of Futurity" (1845) Thomas Corwin, Against the Mexican War (1847)

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY (SEMESTER I) INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY INDICATORS SEMESTER I 8. The slave system and the coming of the Civil War. Characterize the “peculiar institution” and its impact on the South. Assess the rise of abolitionism and its effect on north-south relations. Identify the nature of “Free Soil” Republicanism. Analyze the beliefs and actions of Lincoln. Characterize the secession movement.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:  Explain the arguments and issues surrounding the profitability and efficiency of slavery.  Discuss the relevant statistics about slave ownership in the South.  Identify the candidates and explain the platforms and outcomes of the presidential elections from 1848 to 1860.  Describe the series of resolutions that resulted in the Compromise of 1850.  Explain the motivations for and the consequences of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854.  Contrast the intent and results of the Ostend Manifesto.  Analyze the reasons for shifting political alignments in this era, specifically: (a) the rise and fall of the Free-Soil party, (b) the disintegration of the Whig party, (c) the appearance and brief success of the Know-Nothing party, and (d) the emergence and victory of the Republican party.  Trace the development of attempts to win Kansas by the proslavery and antislavery forces, noting specifically: (a) the "sack of Lawrence," (b) the role of John Brown, and (c) the Lecompton Constitution.  Discuss the effects of social and cultural sectionalism in preparing the path for southern secession.  Discuss the background, final decision, criticisms, and implications of the Dred Scott case of 1857.  Contrast the positions taken by Republican Abraham Lincoln and Democrat Stephen Douglas in the debates held for the Illinois Senate race of 1858. Technology-Based Resources Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 De Bow’s Review, “The Stability of the Union,” (1850) Harriet Beecher Stowe, from Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852)

9. The Civil War and Reconstruction Analyze the emancipation movement. Examine the military course of the war. Assess the political, social, and economic features of Reconstruction.

21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking: Document-Based Question The Crittenden Compromise Lesson Objectives:  Trace the development of southern secession from Lincoln's election through the decision of the upper South to join the Confederacy including the establishment of the Confederacy.  Evaluate the Republican decision to reject the Crittenden compromise plan.  Explain why "King Cotton Diplomacy" failed.  Trace and explain Lincoln's gradual movement toward the emancipation of the slaves.  Describe the role played by African-American troops in the Union armed force during the Civil War.  List and describe the principal social and economic changes that accompanied the Civil War.  Describe the experience of Northern and Southern women during the war.  Describe the lasting effects of the Civil War on the nation.  Contrast the presidential and congressional wartime reconstruction programs.

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY INDICATORS SEMESTER I             

Explain how Andrew Johnson's background shaped his attitudes and policies on Reconstruction. Describe the processes by which Andrew Johnson lost support in Congress and the Radical Republicans gained control of Reconstruction. Summarize the goals of Radical Reconstruction and evaluate the success with which these goals were achieved. Define the sections of the Fourteenth Amendment and understand why its enforcement was crucial to Reconstruction efforts. Describe the Radicals' attempt to remove President Johnson from office. Analyze the important results of the impeachment crisis on the federal government and the Reconstruction process. Define the southern systems of contract labor and sharecropping with emphasis on their effects upon African Americans. Identify the major groups that made up the southern Republican governments, then evaluate their achievements and list the reasons for their ultimate failure. Summarize the worst of the scandals that rocked the Grant administration. Evaluate Grant's handling of the major problems of his administration: the money question, enforcement of Reconstruction, and governmental corruption. Explain the nature of the political crisis involving the election of 1876 and discussion the terms and result of the "Compromise of 1877." Describe the social and political effects of the "Redeemer" regimes in the New South. Evaluate Reconstruction in terms of its successes and failures for the nation as a whole and for Black Americans in particular. Evaluate historians' changing views of Reconstruction.

Technology-Based Resources W. Jefferson Davis, Address to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America (1861) Abraham Lincoln, Second Inaugural Address (1865) The Flag of Secession Emancipation Proclamation Gettysburg Address Surrender of General Lee at Appomattox The Nation, “The State of the South” (1872) Albion W. Tourgee, Letter on Ku Klux Klan Activities (1870) 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking: Document-Based Question Constitutional and Social Developments 1865-177: A Revolution?

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY (SEMESTER I) INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY INDICATORS SEMESTER I 10. The Gilded Age (1865-1900) Characterize the movements that drove the Settling the West Analyze the arguments presented by laissez-faire and Social Darwinism. Describe the factors which contributed to the rise of the industrialists. Analyze labor’s response to industrialization. Characterize and assess the effects of urbanization and the “new” immigration. Analyze the politics of the 1890’s: big government Republicans and the Populists.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:  Analyze the various factors that ended tribal life for the Native Americans.  Explain the United States' policies toward Native Americans and the results of those policies.  Discuss the motives that stimulated migration to the West.  Discuss each of the major factors that contributed to the rapid industrialization of 18701900.  Describe the principal economic and social effects of the railroad from18651900 and trace the building of the American railroad network from 18651900.  Detail the rise and consolidation of the steel industry.  Detail the rise and consolidation of the oil industry.  List and describe the most important inventions of the last third of the nineteenth century, including their major effects.  Identify and explain each of the major factors in the development of a national consumer market.  Compare and contrast the policies and methods of the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor.  Discuss the violence that emerged from employer/employee conflict and assess the role of the U.S. government in restoring order.  Identify and describe the major problems of American central cities in the Victorian era.  Explain and evaluate the operation of the early political "machines."  Compare and contrast the educational and civil rights policies of Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DuBois.  Describe the principal tenets of Social Darwinism and the opposing reform theory, including some of the specific arguments of major proponents of each view.  Describe and evaluate the American agrarians' grievances in the late nineteenth century.  Trace the growth of the farmers' protest from the Grange through the Farmers' Alliance.  Detail the establishment of the Populist Party, its platform, and its first presidential election.  Discuss the march of "Coxey's Army" and the "great" Pullman strike of 1894 and its importance in the 1890s.  Explain the divisions between capital and labor and between "old" and "new" miners in the Midwestern coal strike of 1894.  Describe the changes in American attitudes toward poverty brought on by the depression of the 1890s.  Explain how the silver issue served as a symbol for a social and political movement.  Compare and contrast the Democratic and Republican presidential campaigns of 1896. Technology-Based Resources Chinese Exclusion Act Andrew Carnegie, from "The Gospel of Wealth" (1889) Edward Bellamy, from Looking Backward (1888)

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Address by George Engel, Condemned Haymarket Anarchist (1886) Mary Antin, The Promised Land (1912) Upton Sinclair, The Jungle (1905) William Jennings Bryan, Cross of Gold Speech (1896) The People’s Party Platform (1892) 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking: Document-Based Question W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY (SEMESTER II) INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY INDICATORS SEMESTER II 1. Toward empire (1850-1900) Identify analyze the foreign policy approaches of the era. Assess the impact of the War with Spain and the Open Door Policy. Analyze the debate over empire.

2. The Progressive Era 1900-1920 Characterize the new urban culture. Assess the effects of reform in the cities and states. Compare the progressive agendas of the New Nationalism and New Freedom.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:  Analyze how and why United States territorial expansion in the 1890s differed from the nation's earlier expansionist moves.  Explain the economic, strategic, and intellectual factors sparking American interest in overseas expansion in the latter nineteenth century.  Contrast the arguments offered for and against ratification of the treaty ending the Spanish American War and providing for American colonies.  Explain the origin and purpose of the Open Door policy in China. Technology-Based Resources Theodore Roosevelt, Third Annual Message to Congress (1903) Henry Cabot Lodge, “The Business World vs. the Politicians” (1895) Josiah Strong, Our Country (1885) 21st Century Skills: Document-Based Questions Expansionism, Old and New The Treaty of Paris, 1899 Lesson Objectives:  Discuss the factors that contributed to a progressive movement of reform from 1890 to 1920.  Explain the changes in American industrialism during the early twentieth century regarding management and organization.  Discuss the contributions made and benefits derived by women, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and immigrants to the nation's economic expansion during the Progressive Era.  Explain the origins and purposes of the Niagara Movement and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).  Analyze the successes and failures of union activities during this era.  Analyze Roosevelt's attitude toward the trusts and the role of the federal government in trade issues and labor disputes.  Summarize the progressive measures of the Roosevelt presidency, with emphasis on railroad regulation, food and drug regulation, and conservation.  Contrast Taft's approach to executive leadership with Roosevelt's, specifying their different attitudes toward reform.  Examine the participation of women in the social-justice movement and in the efforts to bring about prohibition and women's suffrage.  Discuss the issues involved and the reasons for Wilson's success in the 1912 election.  Define the basic theory and attitude behind Wilson's New Freedom.

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Technology-Based Resources William Graham Sumner, What the Social Classes Owe to Each Other (1883) National American Woman Suffrage Association, Mother’s Day Letter (1912) Jane Addams, "Ballot Necessary for Women" (1906)

3. World War I Characterize the foreign policy and “moral diplomacy” of Woodrow Wilson. Characterize the nature of the American effort of mobilization for the war. Analyze the debate over the Treaty of Versailles.

21st Century Skills: Document-Based Question Prohibition, 1900-1919 Lesson Objectives:  Discuss the new role of the United States in Latin America and the various diplomatic approaches of Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson.  Compare and contrast the arguments of the preparedness advocates and the pacifists.  Understand the factors that brought the U.S. into the war and the extent to which German belligerence in the North Atlantic was responsible.  Show the ways in which the wartime partnership between citizens and government worked and how the war affected women and African Americans.  Specify the steps by which America mobilized for war.  Define the different goals of the victorious nations at the Paris Peace Conference, and explain how Wilson's goals were incorporated into the treaty.  Discuss the reasons for the failure of Wilsonian global idealism and the Versailles treaty.  Reflect on American disillusionment and the decline of the progressive spirit as the 1920s set in. Technology-Based Resources Warren G. Harding, Campaign Speech at Boston (1920)

4. The transition to modern America. Identify the origins and characteristics of the “second industrial revolution”. Characterize American urbanization. Analyze the rural counterattack to industrialization and urbanization.

21st Century Skills: Document-Based Question The Fight over the Versailles Treaty Lesson Objectives:  Explain the elements of the economic changes of the 1920s.  List the weaknesses of the American economy in the 1920s.  Discuss the impact of the rise of the city.  Analyze the key elements of the literary movement of the 1920s.  Discuss the impact and import of the Harlem Renaissance.  Describe the main features of the rural reaction of the 1920s.  Analyze the election of 1928.

Assess the significance of the election of 1928.

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Technology-Based Resources Comprehensive Immigration Law (1924) Bartolomeo Vanzetti, Court Statement (1927)

5. The Great Depression and the New Deal, 1929-1938 Analyze the Roosevelt perspective on reform. Evaluate the causes of the rise of organized labor. Assess the relief, recovery, and reform legislation that comprised the New Deal. Evaluate the impact of the New Deal. Characterize the opponents of the New Deal. 6. America and the world, 1921-1945 Identify the origins of American isolationism and neutrality. Assess the development of the wartime alliances. Characterize the war’s impact on the “home front”. Evaluate the success and failure of Wartime diplomacy.

21st Century Skills: Document-Based Question The Immigration Restriction Law of 1924 Lesson Objectives:  Explain the causes of the "great bull market" and the stock market crash.  Describe the material and psychological effects of the Great Depression.  Discuss President Hoover's attempts to end the Depression.  Analyze the New Deal legislation passed in the "Hundred Days."  Differentiate between Roosevelt's programs for relief and recovery.  Compare and contrast the programs of the various critics of the New Deal. Technology-Based Resources Herbert Hoover, Speech at New York City (1932) Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Speech at San Francisco (1932) Huey Long, "Share Our Wealth" (1935) Father Charles E. Coughlin, "A Third Party" (1936) Lesson Objectives:  Summarize the foreign policy of the United States in the 1920s.  Explain the causes and effects of the isolationism of the 1930s.  Discuss the changes the war brought about in domestic economic development.  Describe the impact of the war on minorities, women, and labor unions.  Explain the impact of war on American politics.  Evaluate the performance of the United States in wartime diplomacy.  Discuss the Allied strategy of the last days of World War II.  Discuss the seeds of Soviet-American tension fostered by the war. Technology-Based Resources Philip Randolph, “Why Should We March?” (1942) The Atlantic Charter (1941) Charles Lindbergh, Radio Address (1941) 21st Century Skills: Document-Based Question The Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:  Explain the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union following World War II.  Evaluate the responses of the Truman administration to the onset of the Cold War.  Discuss the origins, developments, and results of the Korean War.  Assess Truman's action in the Berlin Crisis. What were his alternatives? Did he make the right choice?  Discuss the Marshall Plan and the Truman Doctrine. How effective were they as foreign policies?  Evaluate Truman's success in extending the New Deal policies of FDR.  Explain the rise and fall of McCarthyism in the United States from 1950 to 1954.  Account for the election of Dwight D. Eisenhower as president in 1952 and 1956.  Evaluate Eisenhower's success or failure in waging the Cold War.

Evaluate the cause and effects of the Korean War.

Technology-Based Resources George F. Kennan, “Long Telegram” (1946) National Security Council Memorandum Number 68 (1950) Joseph R. McCarthy, from Speech Delivered to the Women’s Club of Wheeling, West Virginia (1950)

8. An era of affluence and anxiety, 1946-1960

Lesson Objectives:  Describe the problems of reconverting to a peacetime economy and the reasons for the surge of the economy after 1946.  Analyze the components of Truman's Fair Deal and establish the reasons why most of his package was not enacted.  Using specific references explain how Eisenhower's administration marked an era of moderation and define "modern Republicanism" as developed during the Eisenhower administration.  Discuss the objectives, victories, and failures of the civil rights movement in the 1950s.  Explain the effects of suburban life on American families and American women in particular.  Explain the effects of suburban life on the landscape of the nation.

Evaluate the effects of the postwar economic boom. Analyze the growth of American suburbs. Assess the arguments presented by the critics of the consumer society. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Fair Deal. Characterize “Modern Republicanism”. Analyze the struggle for civil rights.

Technology-Based Resource Brown v. Board of Education (1954) 21st Century Skills: Document-Based Question The Civil Rights Movement

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:

 Summarize the main events and results of the Bay of Pigs landing and the Cuban missile crisis.  Compare and contrast the arguments for continued confrontation or conciliation with the Russians in the context of the Cuban missile crisis.  Understand the reasons for America's buildup of military strength in Vietnam and how this escalation undermined the Johnson administration.  Describe the escalation of America's involvement in the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1968.  Discuss the key elements of Kennedy's New Frontier domestic agenda and his success or failure in enacting it.  Summarize the key Supreme Court decisions and their impact on reform of the early 1960s.

Technology-Based Resources Charles Sherrod, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Memorandum (1961) Donald Wheeldin, “The Situation in Watts Today” (1967) John F. Kennedy, Cuban Missile Address (1962) Lesson Objectives:

Identify the policies responsible for ending the Vietnam War.

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Evaluate the long-term impact of the Watergate scandal. 11. The Republican Resurgence, 1980-1992

Technology-Based Resources National Organization for Women, Statement of Purpose (1966) Jimmy Carter, The "Malaise" Speech (1979) Lesson Objectives:

Evaluate the impact of Détente on U.S. – Soviet relations.

Identify the reasons for The Reagan victory in 1980. Evaluate “Reaganomics”. Analyze the Iran-Contra scandal. Explain the reasons for the end of the Cold War.

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Explain Nixon's first term goals and accomplishments in domestic affairs. Discuss the objectives of Nixon's foreign policy and his strategy for ending the Vietnam War. Account for the overwhelming reelection of Nixon as president in 1972. Explain the causes and the role played by President Nixon in the Watergate scandal. Assess the impact of the Watergate controversy on the American political system. Account for the public disenchantment with Carter that resulted in his one term presidency. Analyze Carter's successes and failures in dealing with foreign affairs.

Discuss the reasons for a conservative resurgence and the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980. Identify the victories as well as the disappointments of Reagan's first-term domestic policies. Account for the rise and fall of the Christian Right in American politics during the Reagan-Bush era. Discuss Reagan's first-term approach to the Soviet Union, the arms race, and options for the future. Analyze the success of Reagan's foreign policies in the Middle East and Central America. Explain the events of the Iran-Contra affair. Discuss the reasons for and results of the Persian Gulf War in 1991. Describe the series of events that signaled an end to the Cold War.

Technology-Based Resource Paul Craig Roberts, The Supply-Side Revolution (1984)

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INDICATOR 1. Examine the kind of government established by the Constitution.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:  Distinguish between direct and representative democracy.  List the major issues on which the delegates to the Constitutional Convention had consensus as well as those issues on which the delegates had conflicts and compromise.  Explain the various ways the framers tried to limit government, including federalism, free elections, and checks and balances.  Describe the concept of separation of powers and its relationship to checks and balances.  Define federalism and its constitutional basis between the national and state governments.  List advantages of federalism as they relate to the needs of a heterogeneous people.  Examine powers of the national government, powers reserved for the states, and concurrent powers shared by the national and state governments.  Identify limits and obligations on both national and state powers.  Describe the expanding role of the federal courts in reviewing state and local government activities through the Fourteenth Amendment, federal mandates, and federal preemption.  Explain the historical growth in national governmental powers relative to the states, including the debate between the centralists and decentralists.  Examine the politics of federal grants, including how the battle over the appropriate level of government to control the funds tends to be cyclical.  Use data to analyze the impact of federal mandates on state and local government.  Debate the arguments against ratification.  Summarize the steps involved in ratifying the Constitution. Technology Based-Resources The Declaration of Independence - http://www.archives.gov/national-archives-experience/charters/declaration.html Charles Beard: Framing the Constitution - http://www.cooperativeindividualism.org/beard_constitution.html Federalist #10 - http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/7.htm Articles IV, V, VI, and VII of the United States Constitution - http://www.archives.gov/national-archivesexperience/charters/constitution.html Federalist #51 and #78 - http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/fedrlist.htm Marbury v. Madison -http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/marbury.htm Full Faith and Credit Clause, National Supremacy Clause and McCulloch v. Maryland http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/10.htm Tenth Amendment - http://www.archives.gov/national-archives-experience/charters/constitution.html

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration Activity Debate: Resolved that the framing of the Constitution was not an exercise in democracy, but an elitist conspiracy. Debate: Resolved that the states can not be trusted to care for their neediest and poorest citizens as well as the federal government; therefore devolution of power to the states and localities in the areas of welfare reform and human services is bad public policy.

2. Discuss the ideological and philosophical traditions on which the framers drew.

Lesson Objectives:  Explain the interacting values that comprise the democratic faith, such as popular consent, respect for the individual, equality of opportunity, and personal liberty; and examine how democratic values may conflict with one another. Technology-Based Resources Thomas Jefferson on Politics and Government - http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/jefferson/quotations/jeff0100.htm

3. Become familiar with a variety of theoretical perspectives relating to the Constitution, such as democratic theory, theories of republican government, pluralism, and elitism.

Lesson Objectives:  Discuss the educational, economic, social, and ideological conditions conducive to establishing and maintaining democracy.  Assess the relationship between political values and economic change (such as industrialization and depression).

4. Identify the different beliefs individuals hold about their government, its leaders and the U. S. political system in general.

Lesson Objectives:  Identify and describe the major values that are shared by most Americans, in the tradition of classical liberalism.  Examine liberalism and criticisms of this school of political thinking.  Examine conservatism and cite criticisms of this school of political thought.  Discuss reasons for the remarkable national unity and identity that exists in a land of such demographic diversity. Technology-Based Resources The Second Bill of Rights (1944) - http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/fdr44.htm#second The World’s Smallest Political Quiz - http://www.theadvocates.org/quiz.html Ideology Survey - http://home.att.net/%7Ebetsynewmark2/PoliticalIdeologySurvey.htm The Political Compass - http://www.politicalcompass.org/ Politopia - http://www.politopia.com/index.htm The Political Quiz Show - http://www.madrabbit.net/webrabbit/quizshow.html Debate: The Conservative Manifesto v. Why I’m Still Left http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/chapter4/deluxe.html Thinking on the Web: What’s Right, What’s Left? - http://www.abacon.com/internetguides/pol/activities.html#act3

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SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT INDICATOR 5. Understand how political beliefs are formed, how they evolve, and the processes by which they are transmitted.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Lesson Objectives:  Define political culture. Also, explain where we learn the American political culture.  Define political socialization and demographics. Technology-Based Resources “Circling the Wagons”, David Brooks - http://www.csulb.edu/~astevens/posc322/files/brooks.htm, Political Socialization - www.thisnation.com/opinion.html Census 2000 - www.usatoday.com/news/bythenumbers/fromt.htm

6. Explain how politics, family, school and the media perpetuate or change political beliefs. 7. Understand what leads citizens to differ from one another in their political beliefs and behaviors and the political consequences of these differences. 8. Focus on the different views of the political process held by people, the demographic features of the American population, and the belief and behavior systems held by specific ethnic, minority, and other groups.

9. Learn the mechanisms that allow citizens to organize and communicate their interests and concerns. Among these are political parties, elections, political action committees (PAC'S), interest groups, and the mass media.

Lesson Objectives:  Explain how family structure impacts upon the American political landscape. Lesson Objectives:  Distinguish between reinforcing cleavages and cross-cutting cleavages.  Define public opinion, attentive public, and political socialization.  Enumerate the main sources of political socialization. Define opinion distribution, intensity, latency, salience, consensus, and polarization. Lesson Objectives:  Evaluate sectional differences in the United States.  Examine the effect of state and local identity on politics.  Examine the impact on American politics of race and ethnicity.  Identify ways in which religion can be important in American politics.  Using data, describe income and wealth distribution in the United States.  Examine the relationship between differing educational levels and political behavior. Lesson Objectives:  Explain Madison's analysis of the problems of faction and possible solutions.  Indicate the most influential interest groups, and their primary concerns relative to government.  Discuss the factors that make an interest group politically potent.  Summarize the major techniques of interest groups.  Research and report on the activities of contemporary interest groups.  Explain how the structure of the election system affects election strategy.  Outline major proposals for reforming the election process, giving pro and con arguments. Technology-Based Resources Interest Group Research – http://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/index.asp Realigning Elections: 1824, 1860, 1896, and 1932 - http://www.multied.com/elections/1824.html http://www.multied.com/elections/1860.html http://www.multied.com/elections/1896.html

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) http://www.multied.com/elections/1932.html Poll Results - http://www.realclearpolitics.com/polls.html Public Opinion - http://www.pollingreport.com/ The Electoral College - The Electoral College Arguments in Favor of the Electoral College - The Framers' Electoral Wisdom Against the Electoral College - Against the Electoral College

10. Examine the evolution of the U. S. party system, the functions and structures of political parties, and the efforts they have on the political process.

21s Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration Activity Debate: Resolved that the Electoral College should be eliminated. Debate: Resolved that the President and all members of Congress should be elected at the same time. Lesson Objectives:  Explain the functions of political parties and the extent to which American political parties are currently performing them.  Describe the methods used by parties to nominate candidates and how these methods have changed over time.  Compare the American two-party system with the multiparty system.  Discuss factors that are associated with the emergence of third parties and independent candidates.  Explain how closed and open primaries work.  Trace the development of political parties and the two-party system in America.  Explain why the electorate prefers divided government.  Explain the structure and function of parties in government.  Examine why parties remain important in the electorate.  Evaluate whether the United States is experiencing party dealignment or realignment.  Debate whether political parties are dying.  Examine the problems of soft money and outside issue advocacy as they relate to the principle of accountability.  Research and report on current campaign finance activity.  Analyze the impact of increased identification with "Independent" status.  Explain the relative importance of party identification, candidate appeal, and issues on voting. Technology-Based Resources

“Virtual Unity: The Morphing of the Party System”, William Schneider http://www.csulb.edu/~astevens/posc322/files/schneider.html Rise of Political Parties - http://www.politics1.com/parties.htm Party Matchmaking Questions - http://www.3pc.net/matchmaker/quiz.html Are You a Republican or a Democrat? - http://www.automatedassessments.com/assessment.aspx?id=65 Campaign Finance - http://www.fundrace.org/ Campaign Finance Reform - http://www.debatabase.org/details_print.asp?topicID=234

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11. Understand the role of the media in the political system, particularly its impact on public opinion, voter perceptions, campaign strategies, electoral outcomes, agenda development, and the images of officials and candidates. 12. Identify the organization and powers, both formal and informal, of the major political institutions in the United States - the Congress, the Presidency, the bureaucracy, and the federal courts.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Political Action Committees - http://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/index.asp Debate: Soft Money is Buying Our Government v. Soft Money is Freedom of Speech http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/chapter7/deluxe.html Buckley v. Valeo 1976 - http://www.campaignfinancesite.org/court/buckley1.html Lesson Objectives:  Define such terms as mass media, “infotainment”, selective exposure, and selective perception.  Assess the issue of media bias in terms of liberalism/conservatism.  Assess the issue of media bias in terms of focus of media coverage.  Describe the impact of new media technologies on politics and campaigning.  Define agenda setting, issue framing, and image making.  Analyze political cartoons for evidence of bias. Lesson Objectives:  Identify and define the basic functions of Congress.  Distinguish between Congress as a law-making institution and as a representative assembly.  Evaluate the impact and power of congressional staff.  Explain the importance of bicameralism.  Distinguish between the delegate and trustee roles of legislators.  Trace the pathway of a current bill as it passes through both houses of Congress.  Analyze the importance of committee and subcommittee chairs and the process by which they are chosen, especially the impact of seniority.  Explain why so many congressional incumbents win.  Evaluate what the public expects of the president in the "unwritten presidential job description."  Describe the office of the presidency as established in the Constitution.  Discuss what factors make for a "great" president and what factors contribute to a failed presidency.  Define judicial review.  Compare judicial activism and judicial restraint and their relationship to political ideology.  Explain how cases reach the Supreme Court.  Describe the powers of the chief justice.  Describe the formal organization of the bureaucracy.  Describe the limitations on bureaucratic power. Technology-Based Resources “The Congressman from $37,000”, Randy Cohen - http://www.csulb.edu/~astevens/posc322/files/cong.html United States House of Representatives - www.house.gov United States Senate - www.senate.gov

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13. Discuss the evolution of power balances and relationships between the various branches of government and political parties, interest groups, the media, and state and local governments.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Law Making - http://thomas.loc.gov/ “What is a filibuster?” - www.thisnation.com/question/037.html Federalist #53, 56, 57, 58, 62, and 63 - http://www.foundingfathers.info/federalistpapers/ Article I United States Constitution - http://www.archives.gov/national-archives-experience/charters/constitution.html Congressional Elections - http://www.opensecrets.org/politicians/index.asp Pork Barrel Spending - http://www.cagw.org/site/PageServer?pagename=reports_pigbook2004 The Case against Congress - http://www.cagw.org/site/PageServer?pagename=reports_pigbook2 Lesson Objectives:  Explain the role of and procedures used in the Senate confirmation powers.  Evaluate why Congress and the Supreme Court have often been willing partners in the expansion of presidential power and identify factors that have strengthened the presidency.  Evaluate the constraints on the ability of the president to act, such as the media and international pressures.  Explain those factors that promote both cooperation and conflict within the congressional-presidential relationship.  Explain why members of Congress have different political perspectives from that of the president.  Discuss why most presidents seem to have greater legislative success when their own party controls both houses of Congress. Conversely, explain how divided government is often preferred by large numbers of the American people.  Explain the reasons why Congress and the president have clashed over the war powers issue. Also, be able to discuss the content of the War Powers Resolution.  Discuss how partisan politics enters the judicial selection process, the size of the federal judiciary, and the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. Technology-Based Resources Federalist #70 - http://www.foundingfathers.info/federalistpapers/ Article II United States Constitution - http://www.archives.gov/national-archives-experience/charters/constitution.html

14. Understand the formation of policy agendas, the enactment of public policies by Congress and the President, and the implementation and interpretation of policies by the bureaucracy and the courts.

21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration Activity Debate: Resolved that members of the Supreme Court should hold office for one twelve year term. Lesson Objectives:  Explain why confirmation politics can become destructive.  List reasons why the presidential use of executive privilege, executive orders, and the veto can promote discord between him and Congress.  Discuss why coalition building is important to a president’s success or failure vis-à-vis Congress.  Analyze historical presidential opinion polls.  Assess the factors that go into redistricting, reapportionment, and gerrymandering, and their impact on House elections.  Debate the need for big government and big bureaucracy, including a discussion of how to reorganize and eliminate waste in them.  Debate the extent to which government should privatize public services.

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15. Investigate policy networks, iron triangles, and other forms of policy sub governments in the domestic and foreign policy areas. 16. Study the development of individual rights and liberties and their impact on citizens.

17. Analyze the workings of the Supreme Court and develop an understanding of its most significant decisions.

18. Examine judicial interpretations of various civil rights and liberties such as freedom of religion, speech, assembly and expression; the rights of the accused; and the rights of minority groups and women.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS) Technology-Based Resources Evolution of the Presidency - http://www.politics1.com/p2000.htm Overview of the Presidency - http://spot.colorado.edu/~mcguire/approv3.html Ranking of the Presidents - http://www.opinionjournal.com/hail/ Lesson Objectives:  Examine bureaucratic accountability to the President and to Congress. Lesson Objectives:  Explain the Nationalization of the Bill of Rights through selective incorporation.  Define human rights and how the Constitution provides for protecting civil rights.  Differentiate between civil rights and civil liberties. 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration Activity Debate: Resolved that affirmative action programs are effective and necessary to promote equitable and adequate pay for women and minorities. Lesson Objectives:  Analyze landmark Supreme Court cases. Technology-Based Resources Gitlow v. New York (1925) - http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/gitlow.htm Lemon v. Kurtzman (1971) - http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/lemoncase.htm Miller v. California - http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/miller.htm Smith Act of 1940 - http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/smith.htm Texas v. Johnson - http://www.tourolaw.edu/patch/Johnson/ Engel v. Vitale - http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/47.htm New York Times Co. v. Sullivan - http://straylight.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0376_0254_ZS.html Lesson Objectives:  Define the Establishment Clause, including what it does and does not prohibit; and the prevailing doctrine.  Analyze the disputes that arise between the Establishment and Free Exercise clauses.  Define the following historic constitutional tests on freedom of speech issue: bad tendency test, clear and present danger test, and the preferred position doctrine.  Identify and define doctrines currently used by the Supreme Court to measure the limits of governmental power on freedom of speech.  Compare the changing social and judicial interpretations of obscenity and pornography.  Describe the impact of time, place, and manner regulations on the freedom of assembly.  Summarize legislative and judicial action toward the regulation of sedition.

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CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)             

Research and report on historical and contemporary First Amendment issues. Define human rights and how the Constitution provides for protecting civil rights. Differentiate between civil rights and civil liberties. Summarize the development of the African American struggle for racial justice from the Civil War to the present. Compare the historical experiences and current demands for equality of women, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and Native-Americans. Describe how the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment is used to limit state action that classifies individuals unreasonably. Compare three tiers of tests used to determine whether a law complies with the equal protection requirement. Distinguish between de facto and de jure segregation. Using maps and data, examine the efforts made in the past by state governments to prevent Blacks from voting, and the steps taken by the Supreme Court to end those efforts. Describe the content and impact of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Analyze the measures used, especially the commerce clause and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, to regulate discriminatory conduct by private individuals and groups. Discuss the controversies caused by the implementation of affirmative action programs. Using data, evaluate the condition of America's African-American underclass a generation after the Kerner Commission Report.

Technology-Based Resources The Civil Rights Acts (see Civil Rights Act of 1957) http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/civrit.htm#1957 Plessey v. Ferguson (1896) - http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/plessy.htm Regents of the University of California v. Bakke http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/burns7/medialib/docs/bakke.htm Adarand Constructors v. Pena - http://straylight.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/93-1841.ZS.html Principles of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights - http://www.aclu.org/ American Center for Law and Justice - www.aclu.org Principles of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights - http://www.aclu.org/ American Center for Law and Justice - www.aclu.org 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/Collaboration Activity Debate: Resolved that the proposed constitutional amendment protecting the American flag be approved and added to the Constitution.

271

SOCIAL STUDIES AP MICRO/MACROECONOMICS

272

SOCIAL STUDIES AP MICRO/MACROECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL

RELATED

OBJECTIVES

Examine, analyze and apply basic economic concepts

Explain and apply the nature and function of product markets (microeconomics)

REF.

CONCEPTS

1.

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Graphical analysis (generate, interpret, analyze charts, graphs, and data to describe and explain economics concepts) Marginal analysis Opportunity cost Utility (utility maximization) Supply and Demand laws Production Possibilities Curve Thinking like an economist

@ OH – 11, E, 12

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

Sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation Profit/loss Circular flow diagram Explicit v. implicit costs Economic v. accounting profit Law of diminishing returns Barriers to entry Market power Price discrimination Pure competition Monopolistic competition Oligopoly Pure monopoly Average fixed cost Average variable cost Average total cost Price determination Marginal revenue=marginal cost Long run and short run cost curves Economies of scale Elasticity Consumer choice Indifference curve Derived demand

@

Lesson Ideas:  Students will develop supply and demand graphs based on a data set and interpret the equilibrium point Technology/Resources: Virtual Economics (CD); Free to Choose video series (PBS); http://www.freetochoose.tv/ 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking

@ = College Board curricular requirements OH = Ohio Economics - Personal Finance Content Standards (Grade, Benchmark, Indicator)

Lesson Ideas:  Students will work in groups to argue and justify which product market is best described in a series of scenarios Technology/Resources: http://www.oecd.org/document/36/0,3343,en_2649_34323_35790244_1_1_1_1, 00.html 21st Century Skills: Collaboration/teamwork

273

SOCIAL STUDIES AP MICRO/MACROECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL

RELATED

OBJECTIVES

Explain and apply the nature and function of factor markets (microeconomics)

Identify and evaluate market failure and the role of government (microeconomics)

Measure and analyze economic performance (macroeconomics)

REF.

CONCEPTS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Marginal factor cost Marginal revenue product MFC=MRP Value of marginal product (VMP) Demand v. quantity demanded of a resource Economic rent Rent-seeking behavior Unions Wage determination Distribution of income Lorenz curve Median voter rule Coase theorem Tax incidence Progressive, proportional, regressive taxes Price floors Price ceilings Problems/benefits of government intervention Externalities Taxation Consumer surplus Producer surplus Private goods Public goods Tragedy of the commons Private v. Public sector Domestic output Gross domestic product Gross national product Personal consumption Net exports Government expenditures Transfer payments Non-transfer payments

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

@ OH 11, E, 11

Lesson Ideas:  Students will debate the economic controversies between free market employment and unified employment Technology/Resources: http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/statistics/index.htm 21st Century Skills: Critical thinking; flexibility

@

Lesson Ideas:  Students will simulate a governmental agency to determine if they should become economically involved and the remedy they could provide for a market failure scenario Technology/Resources: http://www.liba.org.uk/issues/2007/Mar%2007/Marketfailure.pdf 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/collaboration; critical thinking

@

@ = College Board curricular requirements OH = Ohio Economics - Personal Finance Content Standards (Grade, Benchmark, Indicator)

Lesson Ideas:  Students will analyze and compare international gross domestic products of their choice and explain what major factors caused these numbers to be different from each other Technology/Resources: http://www.bea.gov/national/ 21st Century Skills: Creativity; multicultural skills

274

SOCIAL STUDIES AP MICRO/MACROECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL

RELATED

OBJECTIVES

Identify and evaluate national income and price determination (macroeconomics)

Identify and analyze the financial sector (macroeconomics)

Identify and analyze inflation, unemployment, and stabilization policies (macroeconomics)

REF.

CONCEPTS

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

National income Consumer price index Inflation Per capita Demand pull inflation Cost push inflation Stagflation Laffer curve Supply side economics Real-business cycle theory

@

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Stock market Bonds, stocks, perpetuities Saving, Investment spending Financial system Central bank theory Creation of money Interest rates Function of money Money market

@ OH – 11, E, 14

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Phillips curve Inflation revisited Expansionary policy Contractionary policy Monetary policy Fiscal policy Federal Reserve System Classical theory of employment Expenditure output approach Leakage-injection approach Built-in stabilizers

@

Lesson Ideas:  Students will research previous quarter’s consumer price indices and analyze the major factors that affected the overall price level and the rate of inflation Technology/Resources: http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/statistics/index.htm 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning

Lesson Ideas:  Students will work in groups to effectively simulate the creation of money acting as either a consumer, financial intermediary or the central bank Technology/Resources: www.nyse.com ; http://vse.marketwatch.com/Game/Homepage.aspx 21st Century Skills: Teamwork/collaboration

@ = College Board curricular requirements OH = Ohio Economics - Personal Finance Content Standards (Grade, Benchmark, Indicator)

Lesson Ideas:  Students will present and analyze current events relating to expansionary and/or contractionary policies Technology/Resources: http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/statistics/index.htm 21st Century Skills: Self-motivation/initiative

275

SOCIAL STUDIES AP MICRO/MACROECONOMICS INSTRUCTIONAL

RELATED

OBJECTIVES

Explain and evaluate economic growth and productivity (macroeconomics)

REF.

CONCEPTS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Aggregate demand Aggregate supply Productivity Recessionary and inflationary gaps GDP and the multiplier

CLARIFICATION (SKILLS, METHODS, RESOURCES, CONNECTIONS)

@

Lesson Ideas:  Students will discuss and analyze the determinants of aggregate demand and aggregate supply while applying theoretical knowledge to a related current event article Technology/Resources: http://bcs.worthpublishers.com/krugmanwells_econ2/default.asp?s=&n=&i=&v =&o=&ns=0&uid=0&rau=0

Identify an open economy through international trade and finance analysis (macroeconomics)

Explain the consequences of the economic choices made by individuals and the tools which they use to manage their financial resources including: a. Budget; b. Savings; c. Investment; d. Credit; e. Philanthropy.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Open economy Closed economy Exchange rates Net foreign investment Trade deficit Supply of foreign currency International comparisons Crowding out effect Free trade v. fair trade Personal finance Debits Credits Loans Fiscal responsibility

@

21st Century Skills: Self-motivation/initiative; Lesson Ideas: Students will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of open and closed economies while analyzing the effectiveness of real-world examples of each. Technology/Resources: http://www.investamerica.gov/home/iia_main_001154.asp 21st Century Skills: Academic/learning

OH – 11, E, 14

@ = College Board curricular requirements OH = Ohio Economics - Personal Finance Content Standards (Grade, Benchmark, Indicator)

Lesson Ideas: Students will work in groups to simulate a personal financial portfolio (checkbook, balance sheet, etc.) to determine how to best manage their personal assets. Technology/Resources: Student created PowerPoint presentation on their group’s financial portfolio 21st Century Skills: Problem-solving; creativity; self-motivation/initiative

276

SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION EVALUATION Evaluation is an integral part of the instruction and curricular process due to the fact that it measures student learning in relation to the indicators and skills forthcoming within this document. Teachers within the Chagrin Falls Exempted Village School District utilize both formative and summative evaluations on a regular basis to assess student progress and guide instruction. Student performance in Social Studies will be assessed in a variety of manners including but not limited to the following:             

Tests / Quizzes Teacher Observations Checklists Self Reflection Projects Essays Rubrics Practical Experiences Homework Oral Reports and Demonstrations Research Papers and Projects Presentations, Debates Socratic Seminar

An underlying aim in all evaluation procedures is to help students begin to understand the importance of and utilize self-assessment and critical thinking to better understand themselves as learners. Evaluation also provides a means for helping students set expectations and devise strategies for achieving those expectations. Administrators and teachers will continue to review and monitor student performance on grade appropriate diagnostic and achievement tests to drive instruction and modify curriculum.

277

CURRICULUM STUDY CYCLE - 2007-2012 Content Area

2007 – 2008

2008 – 2009

2009 - 2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

English Language Arts Music

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

Foreign Language

5

1

2

3

4

Family/Consumer Science Science

5

1

2

3

4

4

5

1

2

3

Guidance

4

5

1

2

3

Art

4

5

1

2

3

Social Studies

3

4

5

1

2

Technology

3

4

5

1

2

Business

3

4

5

1

2

Gifted and Talented Library

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

1

Mathematics

2

3

4

5

1

Health

2

3

4

5

1

Physical Education

2

3

4

5

1

KEY 1 – Study Group – Research best practices, study state and national standards and post secondary 2 – Action Research – Evaluate current instructional practices in light of research based practices 3 – Curriculum Writing – Develop the course of study and grade level assessment calendar 4 – Lesson Study – Implement curriculum and newly adopted materials, develop and establish assessments 5 – Lesson Study - Implement curriculum and newly adopted materials, develop and refine assessments

278

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