Unit 1- Plot, Setting, and Character

January 21, 2018 | Author: Anonymous | Category: Arts & Humanities, Performing Arts, Drama
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Unit 1- Plot, Setting, and Conflict SEPTEMBER 16, 2012-SEPTEMBER 20, 2012 PAGE 25-64 OBJECTVIES: CITE SEVERAL PIECES OF TEXTUAL EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT ANALYSIS OF WHAT THE TEXT SAYS EXPLICITLY. ANALYZE HOW DIFFERENT ELEMENTS OF A STORY INTEREACT.

Monday’s Bellwork  On your own, think of an unforgettable story that

you have read or heard.  Open book to page 26 and work with your elbow partner (right or left). NOT in front or behind. 

With your partner discuss the following questions then answer them in your writer’s notebook in bellwork section. What makes a story unforgettable?  What do your reasons have in common?  After your discussion, how would you answer the original question. 

Vocabulary Words Contemporary

Element

Identify

Influence

Structure

Prediction

Definition

What drives a story?  Plot  Conflict  Setting  Characters  Level Up: Plot stages  http://my.hrw.com/la_2010/na_lit/student/levelup/lit210/s hell.html

Plot, Conflict, Setting, and Characters  Setting- a time and

place of the action. 





Time: Historical era, the season, or the time of the day Place: might be a country, a neighborhood, or a room. Setting influences the plot and affects the characters’ feelings

Plot, Conflict, Setting, and Characters  Characters- the people,

animals, or imaginary creatures that take part in a story.  The characters’ behavior affects what happens.

Plot, Conflict, Setting, and Characters  Plot- the series of events

in a story.  Plot usually centers on a conflict, a struggle between different forces. 



Draw the chart on page 28 about external and internal conflict.

Conflict fuels the action, moving the plot forward. A conflict can be external or internal.

Plot, Conflict, Setting, and Characters  Finding Nemo

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpV7NIJTxD0&f eature=related Who is the main character? What problems or conflicts does the character face? List as many as you can. Which conflict is most important? Is the main conflict inside the character’s mind (internal), or is it between the character and an outside force (external)?

Plot Development  Listing the major events in a story and details related

to the plot development can be a helpful technique in understanding the story.  These devices add complexity to a story’s plot.  

 

Story may begin in the middle of the action Sequence of events may be interrupted to tell about an event in the past or future 1 or more subplots that make the main plot more interesting Climax occurs at or near the end of the story, leaving the reader with unanswered questions about the characters and conflict.

Plot Development  Usually, a story begins by introducing the main

   

character who has a conflict. Then the story develops around the conflict. Important events move the story forward. Foreshadowing- hinting at, future actions As the story moves on, the character must find a solution to the conflict. Once the problem is solved, the story ends. This process is known as plot development.

Plot Development  A typical plot has 5 stages of action.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffAOkGg2Lr4  By understanding these stages, you will know what

to look for in a story.  At the beginning—or exposition– of a story, pay attention to the details that tell you about the characters, the setting, and any potential conflicts.

Plot Development  Exposition- Introduces the setting and the  

 

characters. Sets up or hints at the conflict. Rising Action- shows how the conflict unfolds and becomes more complicated and builds suspense Climax- Is the most exciting moment and the turning point. Often results in a change for the main character. Falling Action- Eases suspense and reveals how the main character begins to resolve the conflict. Resolution-Ties up loose ends and sometimes offers and unexpected twist before the story ends.

Plot Development  On your own read Last Cover and be ready to discuss

your answers to these questions: 



What can you tell about the setting in which the main character lives? Review the boxed details. Describe the conflict that the main character faces. What does this conflict suggest the story will be about?

 On your own read The Third Wish and be ready to

discuss your answers to these questions:  

Reread the boxed text. What conflict is Mr. Peters facing? During the rising action, the plot moves toward the climax. What future decision or action might this situation hint at, or foreshadow?

Closure Identify the common parts of a story and tell how these elements help make a story unforgettable. These are your tickets out of the door and go in the turtle box.

Write on a half sheet of paper Revisit the big question. What makes a story unforgettable?

Weekly Assignments due Friday:  Page 32-33 answer the questions on the side of the

page using the story The Dinner Party.  Note taking: Plot Development  Academic Vocabulary chart

SSLAM  Work and finish the article on 9/11  Read Exploring the Titanic on pages 104-118 on

your own by next week.

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